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Khiov Music Vinyl, CD & Tape 9 Artikel

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Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny - Beyond The Missouri Sky
Charlie Haden & Pat Metheny
Beyond The Missouri Sky
2LP | 2013 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
59,99 €*
Release:2013 / KR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Charlie Haden and Pat Metheny have been good friends since the 1970s, so it comes as a bit of a surprise that "Beyond The Missouri Sky" should be their first duet album together. Both musicians are from small towns in Missouri, which leads Metheny to speculate in the liner notes if this similarity of childhood ambience might have something to do with the two players' obvious love and affinity for each other. Whatever the answer, the result of this logical pairing is a rather somber and moody one. Metheny has a dark tone on his electric guitar, and on "Beyond The Missouri Sky", where he plays acoustic, his sound is similarly deep and rounded. Metheny has called Haden one of the greatest improvisers of all time, and although this may be hyperbolic exaggeration from a longtime friend, Haden has at least earned the right to defend the claim. On Beyond the Missouri Sky, his playing is as sensitive and beautiful as always. Although one can understand the vibe that Haden and Metheny were going for, the preponderance of slow and mid-tempo material can wear on the listener. When they eschew the dirge-like tempos, as on the fantastic "The Precious Jewel", the results are just as atmospheric and are, in fact, even more evocative of the Midwestern landscapes that are featured so prominently in the album art. With Metheny setting up a strummy rhythm, Haden plays the stately melody with impeccable tone. This track, one of many, also showcases Metheny overdubbing different guitars to thicken out the sound of the performance. The results are similar, at least in spirit, to Bill Frisell's recordings in the latter half of the 1990s. Although many Metheny and Haden compositions that are featured on this record, it is their readings of older material that are most effective. The Jimmy Webb classic "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" is wonderfully nostalgic, as Metheny uses subtle guitar and synth washes to pad a beautiful duet performance, and the traditional "He's Gone Away" is the greatest lullaby that never was. Overall, "Beyond The Missouri Sky" is a fine record when the material is happening, but a bit of a chore when it is not.For the 1st time on vinyl, specially released for the Korean market!
Eric Johnson - Venus Isle
Charlie Haden - Nocturne
Paco De Lucia, Al Di Meola & John McLaughlin - Guitar Trio
Paco De Lucia, Al Di Meola & John McLaughlin
Guitar Trio
LP | 2013 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
44,99 €*
Release:2013 / KR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
For the 1st time on vinyl, specially released for the Korean market!
Lee Ritenour & Larry Carlton - Larry & Lee
Renee Fleming - Dark Hope
Renee Fleming
Dark Hope
LP | 2016 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
42,99 €*
Release:2016 / KR – Original
Genre:Pop
It’s fitting that Renée Fleming, 'the people’s diva', would make an album of pop songs that feels more like a labor of love than a crossover attempt. "Dark Hope" is filled with songs and arrangements that wouldn’t appear on a typical attempt to bring a classical vocalist into the mainstream -- witness her dark, intricate take on the Mars Volta’s “With Twilight as My Guide”. It should almost go without saying that Fleming's voice is just as remarkable here as it is in her usual milieu, but the album proves time and again that she is game for just about anything. Fleming learned how to sing in the more intimate, confessional style that "Dark Hope's" singer/songwriter and alternative rock fare requires just for this project; combined with her interpretive gifts, she does a masterful job of remaining true to the spirit of the original songs while offering her own twists on them. Her voice dances over the wordy, syllable-heavy lyrics of Willy Mason's “Oxygen”, brings a mature moodiness to “Stepping Stone” that was lacking in Duffy's spitfire version, and remains connected to the intimacy in the Arcade Fire’s “Intervention” even as the song swells around her. Indeed, "Dark Hope's" swelling arrangements are as much a weakness as they are a strength: at times, it feels like the album’s producers didn’t trust that her gorgeous voice singing these songs would be enough of a draw. Fleming is divinely torchy on Muse's “Endlessly”, but her trip-hop-tinged surroundings are no match for her rich vocals. Her interpretation of Band of Horses' “No One’s Gonna Love You” is let down by an arrangement that sounds like generic alt-pop -- though, on the other hand, it’s a relief that it doesn’t sound like "A String Tribute" to Band of Horses. Despite these problems, both of these songs are among "Dark Hope's" standout tracks, along with the subtly sultry electro-folk turn on Jefferson Airplane’s “Today” and the urgent yet airy reading of Death Cab for Cutie's “Soul Meets Body”. It’s just frustrating that even songs as revered as Leonard Cohen's “Hallelujah” -- which is virtually a standard at this point -- are burdened with anything that takes away from a voice as remarkable as Fleming's singing a melody that powerful. She deserves credit for undertaking such a bold enterprise.
John Scofield - This Meets That
John Scofield
This Meets That
2LP | 2016 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
57,99 €*
Release:2016 / KR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
"This Meets That" finds guitarist John Scofield looking both backward and forward. It's his first recording for the Emarcy label, but for the occasion Scofield resurrected the trio he'd used on several previous albums, most recently 2004's "EnRoute": bassist Steve Swallow and drummer Bill Stewart. Never one to rest on his laurels, Scofield has throughout his career applied his virtuosity to several different streams of jazz, ranging from fusion-esque to orchestral to straight bop. "This Meets That" is something of a mixed bag. The opening track, the Scofield-penned "The Low Road", is a swinging funk jam that's one of several tunes on the record to employ a four-piece horn section. It's a smoker of a track, with Scofield often teasing with distortion but never straying so far away that it might be called unmelodic. In addition to the Scofield originals, three left-field cover songs demonstrate Scofield's ability to apply his technique and imaginative thinking to just about anything he chooses. Perhaps one shouldn't be surprised that a musician always looking to expand his reach would try his hand at squeezing a classic country hit into a jazz framework, but that's what Scofield does on the old Charlie Rich ballad "Behind Closed Doors". It's a sweet, bluesy take and Scofield maintains a pure, clear, non-ironic tone as he explores the song's nuances. The album-closing "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", from the Rolling Stones' songbook, is treated much the way Otis Redding once did, as a forceful soul stomper (albeit with brilliant soloing), and "House of the Rising Sun", a traditional blues recorded by dozens of diverse artists, but perhaps best known from the Animals' 1964 hit, veers far from its familiar melody as Scofield plays tag with guest guitarist Bill Frisell and Stewart and Swallow race around each other and the two stringsmen. "Heck of a Job", its title an obvious reference to President Bush's much-ridiculed "heck of a job, Brownie" statement in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, does use as its foundation a rhythmic base that could have come from New Orleans' Meters, while "Strangeness in the Night" isn't that strange at all, with its stop-and-go rhythm and punchy interplay. "Pretty Out", however, is pretty out there, not quite anarchic but open-ended and frisky. "This Meets That", as its title implies, is less of a thematic album than some of Scofield's more recent endeavors, but it's one that reminds listeners that both his chops and sense of adventure are not only intact but still growing.
Bobby McFerrin - Beyond Words
Bobby McFerrin
Beyond Words
2LP | 2014 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
54,14 €* 56,99 € -5%
Release:2014 / KR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Creative vocalist Bobby McFerrin's return to Blue Note after a nearly ten-year absence indicates a possible desire for a return to improvised jazz, and in a way distancing himself from the classical works he had become increasingly associated with. Working again with pianist Chick Corea and producer Linda Goldstein, his 2002 album, "Beyond Words", is reminiscent of the other McFerrin/Corea collaborations ("Play", "The Mozart Sessions"), but somehow these mostly improvised works lack the spark that their previous partnerships have created. Ably backed by Corea's bright piano, Omar Hakim on drums, and Richard Bona on bass, the songs feel to be all the same texture for the most part, never reaching any kind of a peak throughout the album. "Beyond Words" is a moody and dark affair, with subtle layers of McFerrin's undulating vocals weaving in and out of the musical bed, but instead of sounding earthy and natural, the album is punctuated by synthesized instruments that pull the recordings dangerously close to smooth jazz territory. Still, it is an excellently performed and cleanly produced document of both McFerrin and Corea's abilities, ideal for gentle background textures on a night in alone
John Scofield - Überjam
John Scofield
Überjam
2LP | 2015 | KR | Original (Khiov Music)
55,09 €* 57,99 € -5%
Release:2015 / KR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
In the jazz world, there are artists who are consistent but predictable and artists who are unpredictable but inconsistent. John Scofield, meanwhile, is an impressive example of a jazzman who is both unpredictable and consistent. You never know what the risk-taking guitarist will do from one album to the next, but he rarely provides an album that is flat-out disappointing. Überjam is a major departure from 2000's "Works For Me", the Verve date that preceded it. While "Works For Me" is essentially a straight-ahead post-bop outing and employs acoustic-oriented players, like pianist Brad Mehldau and bassist Christian McBride, "Überjam" is pure, unadulterated fusion. This album always has a jazz mentality -- "Überjam" is as spontaneous, free-spirited, and uninhibited as any bop session that was recorded in Rudy Van Gelder's studio in the '50s -- but on "Überjam", having a jazz mentality doesn't mean excluding elements of funk, rock, and, at times, hip-hop and club music. To those who fancy themselves jazz purists, the phrase 'pure, unadulterated fusion' will sound like an oxymoron; if jazz is fused, how can it be real, authentic jazz? But then, George Duke hit the nail on the head when he asserted that jazz was always fusion; even back in the days of Jelly Roll Morton and King Oliver, jazz had a variety of influences. It simply became more fused when Miles Davis recorded "Bitches Brew" and "In A Silent Way" in the late '60s. And speaking of Davis, much of "Überjam" reflects Scofield's years with that restless trumpeter. Like many of Davis' fusion efforts, "Überjam" has no problem being cerebral and funky at the same time. The material tends to be abstract and intellectual, but not at the expense of grit. "Überjam" is yet another excellent album from an improviser who refuses to be predictable.
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