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Lee Hazlewood Vinyl, CD & Tape 9 Artikel

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Lee Hazlewood - 13
Lee Hazlewood
13
LP | 2017 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
22,49 €* 24,99 € -10%
Release:2017 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
"Pimps… whores… pushers… dopers… gangsters… and bottom of the human chain shit-heels. Now you’re probably thinking I'm writing about major record companies and their unscrupulous executives… and lawyers. You could be right… but this time… YOU'RE WRONG! I'm describing the characters in my album "13"…some I knew… some I invented … some are true… some are false… some i liked… some i didn't. But they all had a story to tell and I told it…none of 'em seem to care… and I don't either… have fun…" - Lee Hazlewood"13 was never supposed to be a Lee Hazlewood album. It is perhaps the strangest record in one of the most varied discographies in music. The bombastic brass heavy funk, deep blues and soul paired with Hazlewood's subterranean baritone would be best enjoyed with a tall Chivas in an off-strip seedy Vegas lounge. It also features one of Hazlewood’s greatest lines ever “One week in San Francisco, existing on Nabisco, cookies and bad dreams, sad scenes and dodging paranoia.” - Larry MarksBy 1972 Lee Hazlewood had settled in his new homeland of Sweden. His days were spent carousing, making movies with Torbjörn Axelman and releasing albums. To keep up his prolific recorded output, Lee began to mine the recently defunct LHI Records archives for material. One such gem, was an unreleased album by Larry Marks.In what became the final days of LHI, staff producer Larry Marks’ sonic fingerprints were on nearly everything; songwriting, producing, arranging, and singing. His most profound contribution was steering the creative direction of the label towards soul and R&B, arranging the downright funky LHI singles by Barbara Randolph and Jon Christian. Larry’s concept was to take Hazlewood’s strongest compositions and arrange them in a soul vibe. An album was completed, but with no distribution in America and no funding, Lee had no vehicle to release Larry’s record. The tapes were taken to Sweden, Larry’s voice was wiped and Hazlewood’s was dubbed….13 was born.This release includes a Lee Hazlewood comic strip, telling the story of “13” through original artwork by Jess Rotter. The record contains a previously unreleased session outtake of “Cold Hard Times” plus never before heard Hazlewood compositions “Drums” & “Susie”. The LP is housed in a deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket, comes with additional liner notes by Hunter Lea including interviews with Larry Marks, Joe Cannon, Torbjörn Axelman & Suzi Jane Hokom and download card for complete “13” sessions including Larry Marks unreleased album, session outtakes and acoustic demos, 29 tracks total.
Lee Hazlewood - Cowboy In Sweden
Lee Hazlewood
Cowboy In Sweden
LP | 2016 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
25,99 €*
Release:2016 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Lee Hazlewood spent a good part of the late 1960s traveling the globe, cutting records and inking business deals. A string of hits with Nancy Sinatra enabled Lee to build a mini media empire Lee Hazlewood Industries and afforded him nearly unlimited resources…for a time. By the end of the decade LHI Records had burned piles of cash, gone through a half dozen distributors and failed to achieve the kind of chart success “Boots" had promised. Fortunately for Lee there was a land where he was still on the top of the charts, a place where women flowed like Brannvin...Sweden was calling. While on an LHI promotional tour in Stockholm, Lee crossed paths with Swedish director Torbjörn Axelman. “I met Lee through my script girl, in Stockholm in 1969,” remembers Axelman. "We noticed we had very many similarities, interests, and the same backgrounds. It led to many productions during our 38 years of close partnership and friendship.” The partnership showed Lee the way forward and allowed him an easy exit strategy from the LHI house of cards that was crumbling in Los Angeles. Light In The Attic records continues its Lee Hazlewood series with this expanded reissue of “Cowboy in Sweden”. Released as the last LHI LP, “Cowboy in Sweden” was a soundtrack to the 1970 cult classic film of the same name starring Lee Hazlewood. The film was a surreal psychedelic account of Lee’s journey to his new homeland, while the soundtrack was a perfect compilation of Hazlewood’s strongest songs recorded over a prolific ,globe-trotting, three year period. The production scope of the album was the most ambitious of his career, recorded in Paris, London, Los Angeles and Stockholm with a slew of talented session musicians, producers and arrangers. “Cowboy in Sweden” is quite possibly the purest distillation of the Hazlewood sound; lush melancholy country pop with a pinch of humor ("Pray Them Bars Away"), a dash of bummer ("Cold Hard Times”), some beautiful ladies to sing with (“Leather & Lace” & “Hey Cowboy”) and even a couple anti-war protest songs to be topical ("No Train to Stockholm” & “For A Day Like Today”). The David “Bitter Sweet Symphony” Whitaker arranged orchestral pop of “What’s More I Don’t Need Her” and the stone cold Hazlewood classic “The Night Before” cement the album as Lee’s peak on LHI records and ironically the label's swan song.The whole album got remastered from pristine LHI master tapes and includes previously unheard versions of “Pray Them Bars Away” & “Easy & Me". The LP is housed in a beautiful deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket and comes with liner notes by Hunter Lea including interviews with Torbjörn Axelman, Suzi Jane Hokom, Nina Lizell, Don Randi, Hal Blaine and Shel Talmy. The material also contains rare film production photos from the Torbjörn Axelman archive.
Lee Hazlewood - Trouble Is A Lonesome Town
Lee Hazlewood
Trouble Is A Lonesome Town
2LP | 1963 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
29,99 €*
Release:1963 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Light In The Attic’s Lee Hazlewood Archive Series continues with an expanded reissue of Lee Hazlewood’s debut album. Re-mastered from the original tapes, this is the first time Trouble Is a Lonesome Town has been available in its original mono mix since the 1960s. Presented as a double LP with 15 bonus tracks and an eight page booklet, this is an essential purchase for Hazlewood fans or anyone curious about about the man before the mustache.
Lee Hazlewood - Something Special
Lee Hazlewood
Something Special
LP | 1968 | US | Reissue (Light In The Attic)
24,99 €*
Release:1968 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
The three years spent on MGM Records between 1966 and 1968 were golden ones for Lee Hazlewood. He spent them working with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom, writing a still-unreleased book, The Quiet Revenge of Elmo Furback, competing with Phil Spector from their respective studios, and coming up with the formula for the "boy/girl” songs for which he'd become famous. In fact, the unflattering portrait on the cover of Something Special did little to hint at how hip this late-flowering talent (he was in his late 30s when “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’” made him a star songwriter) had become. The common strand on the MGM trilogy is one of the unexpected happening. They were an ill fit for a major label–experimental, difficult to pigeonhole, and unpredictable. Those descriptors apply nowhere more aptly than Something Special. Where 1966's The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and 1967's Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure had employed an arranger, Billy Strange, and a full orchestra, Something Special stripped things back and brought in a flavor of jazz and blues, complete with gravelly-voiced scatting courtesy of collaborator Don Randi. This sat alongside tracks like “Little War” and “Hands,” the kind of late night, acoustic balladeering Hazlewood would later seize for his career-highlight LP, Requiem For An Almost Lady. The sound was that of a stripped-down nightclub jazz/blues/folk combo, fully rejecting the psychedelic music going on all over the world. The album made clear that forging a career as a serious star was not at the top of Hazlewood's agenda, and at the third opportunity, he'd let the listener in on the joke. Tellingly, Hokom recalls Hazlewood saying the MGM albums were his “expensive demos. I’m sure that MGM thought that they would be successful.” Little chance of that with Something Special–it was originally released only in Germany. The same year, Hazlewood founded the LHI imprint, and began building his own empire, one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, three albums that generated some of Hazlewood's best–and most varied–work.
Lee Hazlewood - There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
Lee Hazlewood
There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
8LP Box | 2014 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
249,99 €*
Release:2014 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Limited edition for Black Friday RSD 2014!Seven years in the making, There’s A Dream I’ve Been Saving is the ultimate artifact for Lee Hazlewood heads new and old. Now, for the first time, you can enjoy the entire experience on vinyl. This landmark box set contains an expansive LP-sized hard cover book detailing the label history of Lee Hazlewood Industries, accompanied by 8 LPs + 4-CDs and the never-before-released film "Cowboy in Sweden".
Lee Hazlewood - The N.s.v.i.p.’s (Not So Very Important People)
Lee Hazlewood
The N.s.v.i.p.’s (Not So Very Important People)
LP | 1964 | US | Reissue (1972)
25,99 €*
Release:1964 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie, Pop
Lee Hazlewood’s partnership with Reprise Records in the 1960s resulted in timeless hits for Dean Martin and Nancy Sinatra. Throughout the decade, though, the label also released three of the artist’s most highly regarded solo works: The N.S.V.I.P.’s, Friday’s Child and Love and Other Crimes. Hazlewood’s 1964 sophomore album The N.S.V.I.P.’s (Not So Very Important People) is the perfect companion to his classic debut, Trouble Is a Lonesome Town, released the year prior. Setting his signature spoken intros to a new cast of small town eccentrics (perhaps modeled on his childhood locale in Mannford, Oklahoma), this early career high-point presents Hazlewood with all of his singular assets already intact: playful lyrics veering toward the bizarre, wry delivery and wonderfully understated pop-country song craft. “First Street Blues” opens The N.S.V.I.P.’s with the saga of Leroy, the once-irascible dragon who converts to a cheerful wino. The small-town drunkard’s likely story merges with fantastic whimsy in Hazlewood’s strange world. Elsewhere, he waxes absurd on “I Had a Friend” about Tarzan’s deficiencies as a citizen and marital prospect for Jane. He even imparts some simple wisdom about the presidential election on “Save Your Vote for Clarence Mudd.” As always, Hazlewood’s tongue is firmly rooted in cheek. Still, it’s easy to just forget that and live inside the poignant songs he creates for each and every one of the not so very important, but absolutely riveting, people—and dragons, too.
Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child
Lee Hazlewood
Friday's Child
LP | 1965 | US | Reissue (1972)
20,79 €* 25,99 € -20%
Release:1965 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie, Pop
Riding the crest of successive hit-making for Duane Eddy, Sanford Clark, Dean Martin and Nancy Sinatra, the ever-industrious Lee Hazlewood still found time to release his excellent third solo album in 1965. His second solo recording for the Reprise label, Friday’s Child indulges his signature country-pop flare and pioneering use of vocal reverb. With electric guitar leads, harp and female backup vocals, the album finds Hazlewood embellishing his arrangements, though some of its strongest moments draw their impact only from his rich timbre. Some artists develop their voice for years; Hazlewood’s third album proves it was an innate and irrevocable gift. Weepy guitar leads kick off the title track and Hazlewood takes up the story of twinkling sorrow and bad luck. He often speckles pain with humor, but “Friday’s Child” is one of his most purely somber ballads. Elsewhere, with finger snaps, sparse backup vocals and Hazlewood’s emotive intonation, the intro of “Houston” alone could carry on entirely a cappella and still endure as a classic. The composition made a hit for Dean Martin, but the Friday’s Child version shows Hazlewood’s inimitable skill as a vocal stylist. Mostly lacking the dada-esque humor of his first two albums, Friday’s Child places Hazlewood in league with the era’s greatest traditional songwriters, though one for whom pop conventions were to be bucked and cast aside.
Lee Hazlewood - There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
Lee Hazlewood
There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
Box Set | 2013 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
103,99 €*
Release:2013 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
For more than a year now, Light In The Attic has been reissuing the solo work of this true American moustachioed maverick. Beyond restored versions of Lee’s debut Trouble is a Lonesome Town and the soundtrack A House Safe for Tigers, the lid has also been lifted on the rich, little-explored archives of the label Lee Hazlewood Industries (LHI), when Hazlewood was svengali and super-producer to a stable full of brilliant artists.This landmark box set is the ultimate artifact for Lee Hazlewood heads new and old, containing a lavishly packaged, expansive 172-page LP sized hard cover book. But every good book deserves a soundtrack and in this case it comes in the form of a four-CD anthology of the LHI label, along with the never-before-released 1970 film Cowboy in Sweden on DVD. The CDs feature Hazlewood songs familiar and less so; surprising covers, doleful duets and little heard LHI gold.One of the most impressive aspects of the LHI box set is the gorgeous 12”x12” LP sized book (perfect for your record shelf), packed with rare beautiful pictures of Lee, his artists (and the occasional horse). The pages roll out the full story of the LHI label, including interviews with Lee and Suzi Jane Hokum, re-assessments of key Hazlewood albums, and artist profiles for the label’s roster, lovingly written by renowned L.A. music journalist/novelist Jessica Hundley. In the illuminating text, a picture of Hazlewood emerges – fiercely talented, brutally independent, a rare, ornery, ruthless and visionary man.A Deluxe Edition of the box set contains all of the above housed in a cloth-bound clamshell box with reproductions of LHI-era artifacts including press photos and a reproduction plane ticket used by Hazlewood back in ‘70. But the true icing on the cake is three data discs which include just about every 45 single and every LP ever released onLHI — in both WAV and MP3 formats. At around 17 albums and 72 singles (totaling 305 songs!), that’s a whole lot of Lee.The deluxe edition includes the following:172 Page Hard Cover Book:- LP-sized cloth bound book with gold foil stamp- Over 150 rare &
unseen photos
+ In depth essays - LHI history, album breakdowns, 27 artist profiles, LHI timeline, and interviews with Lee & dozens of label alum.Cowboy in Sweden The Film, on DVD (1970, 60 mins):- First time available. New digital transfer from the original 16mm master negative at the Swedish Broadcasting Co. Fully restored in HD with re-mastered sound. Region Free.4 CDs (107 Tracks):- Meticulously Re-mastered. Analog transfers captured at 24-bit/96-kHz. 95% of transfers from original analog master tapes (remainder transferred from mint vinyl). - DISCS 1 & 2: Everything Lee recorded for LHI, including every 45 single and album (Cowboy in Sweden, Forty, The Cowboy & The Lady, and Requiem For an Almost Lady), plus a handful of unreleased tracks.- DISCS 3 & 4: Key tracks from the LHI stable
 of artists, including Suzi Jane Hokom, The Kitchen Cinq, Ann-Margret, Honey Ltd., The International Submarine Band, Arthur, The Aggregation, Sanford Clark, Lynn Castle, The Surprise Package, Virgil Warner, and Hamilton Streetcar, amongst many others.- 14 unreleased tracksFrom Lee’s Personal ‘Stache:- Flexi disc featuring unheard Lee ‘studio chatter’ (“Play it like a cowboy song”)- Reproduction of Lee’s original embossed LHI business card- 5 random copies include a “Golden Ticket” for a free subscription to Light In The Attic’s Lee Hazlewood Archive Series
Lee Hazlewood - The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes & Backsides 1968-1971
Lee Hazlewood
The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes & Backsides 1968-1971
2LP | 2012 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
26,99 €*
Release:2012 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
With his handlebar moustache and booming baritone, Lee Hazlewood was one of the defining stars of the late ‘60s. Though he’s perhaps best known for his work with Nancy Sinatra (including writing mega-hit “These Boots Are Made For Walking”), Hazlewood did stunning work away from that particular glamour queen and found latter day champions in Beck, Sonic Youth, and Jarvis Cocker. Now, for Record Store Day 2012, we are kicking off our excavation of the Lee Hazlewood archives with this anthology, Singles, Nudes & Backsides, collecting the best of Lee’s solo songs and duets from his LHI (Lee Hazlewood Industries) imprint.As a true legend of the great American songbook and a rebellious pioneer who left behind a lengthy trail of echo laden pop masterpieces, Lee’s influence continues to reverberate today. Between 1968-71, Hazlewood not only released his finest solo work, but produced numerous artists on LHI. From acid-folk and country-rock to pop-psych and soul, LHI issued dozens of long forgotten 45s and LPs. This series will include material from LHI (re-mastered for the first time from the original analog tapes), along with Lee’s output for other labels, rarities, unreleased gems, and the films of Torbjörn Axelman.See the sleeve: surrounded by nude girls, each wearing a fake moustache, Hazlewood wears a suit, ever-so-slightly awkwardly playing the role of the ‘60s playboy. Just like the picture, the songs present a man conflicted; he’s the tender-hearted romantic, the broken-hearted loser and the rugged cowboy, all in one. It’s there in the western swing of “Califia (Stone Rider)”, the loneliness of ”The Bed” and the bleak beauty of ”If It’s Monday Morning.” Hazlewood’s tremulous voice was made for duets (indeed, he wrote ”Some Velvet Morning”, one of the greatest of all time); here, Suzi Jane Hokom, Ann-Margret and Nina Lizell play counterpart to his manly tones.In the wonderful liner notes, written by British journalist Wyndham Wallace, the writer describes his friend Hazlewood as “a curmudgeonly, unpredictable sort at the best of times, as impatient with his own talent as he is with other people.” The Hazlewood Wallace knew was puzzled by the growing interest in him in the last two decades of his life, which was ended by cancer at age 78. That late flurry of interest saw him perform at the Royal Festival Hall in 1999, his first ever solo performance in the UK.A natural wanderer, Lee lived a big life, fighting in the Korean War, working as a radio DJ in Phoenix, Arizona, setting up Viv Records in the ‘50s, working as a big-shot LA producer in the ‘60s, signing Phil Spector to his Trey Records label and prematurely announcing retirement in the wake of the mid-‘60s British invasion. He didn’t: Nancy Sinatra came along, the hits started flowing and he continued producing characterful solo albums into the ‘70s, which saw his move to Sweden. By 2007, Hazlewood was living in Vegas, and begrudgingly enjoying that flurry of latter-day interest in his work. This landmark compilation promises to create many more converts.
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