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Lee Hazlewood Vinyl, CD & Tape 5 Artikel

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Lee Hazlewood - Cruisin' For Surf Bunnies Sunset Orange Vinyl Edition
Lee Hazlewood
Cruisin' For Surf Bunnies Sunset Orange Vinyl Edition
LP | 2018 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
27,99 €*
Release:2018 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Deep in the LHI tape archive hid a mysterious tape marked “Woodchucks.” The tape held a "lost” instrumental surf album recorded by Lee Hazlewood in the early 1960s. Some of the songs have been recorded by The Astronauts, Jack Nitzsche, Dick Dale and His Del-Tones, Takeshi Terauchi, The Ventures, John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin), The Trashmen, The Challengers and The Surfaris. Lee’s original recordings have never been released. Bask in the reverb drenched twang of Lee Hazlewood’s original versions for the first time ever!Light in the Attic Records is proud to continue it’s Lee Hazlewood archive series with this very special release. Not a reissue, but rather a brand new, never before released time capsule from the surf era. Lee Hazlewood’s Woodchucks Crusin’ for Surf Bunniesis the perfect soundtrack for sun-baked skin and salty waves, hot rods and summer love. It’s the soundtrack to the American dream in the early 1960s and it comes from California. Though Lee and Suzi Jane Hokom hadn’t met yet, they were both living that dream…Suzi with her group The Surf Bunnies and Lee on his brief surf music tangent with albums like Al Casey’s Surfin’ Hootenanny, Hal Blaine and the Young Cougars and The Glaciers From Sea to Ski.“He was trying to do too much at that period of time. He was just throwing stuff around, but this sounds like a complete project. If there was an airplay record in there, he probably could’ve had a band go out and be the Woodchucks or whatever he wanted to call them. It’s a good surf album. I really loved it. He was a master…there’s no question about it. He invented sounds that no one was doing.” – Shackleford and “Lonely Surfer,” Marty CooperAlbum mastered from pristine LHI master tape. All tracks previously unreleased. Liner notes by Hunter Lea with an interview from Marty Cooper. Album art featuring unpublished photos of Suzi Jane Hokom’s early 1960s group The Surf Bunnies. LP pressed at RTI and housed in a deluxe Stoughton tip-on jacket.
Lee Hazlewood - The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood
Lee Hazlewood
The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood
LP | 1966 | US | Reissue (Light In The Attic)
24,99 €*
Release:1966 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
Lee Hazlewood was a late bloomer. Following a meandering career as a disc jockey, producer, songwriter, label executive and solo artist, Hazlewood hit the jackpot at the ripe age of 37 with “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” the song Nancy Sinatra took to the top of the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. Its success convinced MGM Records that Hazlewood was a bankable star, and they signed him as an artist in his own right the same year. But as a self-described "non-singer" whose cult 1963 debut, Trouble Is A Lonesome Town, was little more than a happy accident, they'd perhaps gotten the wrong end of the stick where Lee was concerned. In three years on the label, Hazlewood delivered three albums and sundry odds and ends, beginning with 1966 album The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood. The LP found Hazlewood gunning–in as much as he ever did–for commercial success, blending country, pop, novelty, mariachi, and lounge music into something unusually of-the-moment. Lushly orchestrated and–like the album that preceded it–half-sung, half-spoken in a way that Hazlewood made all his own, the album collected solo versions of songs made famous by Sinatra and others (“Sand,” “Boots,” “So Long Babe,” “Summer Wine”–included as a bonus duet with Suzi Jane Hokom) alongside some of his career-best solo compositions, among them the Morricone-like opener, “For One Moment.” It’s a record of extremes: “When A Fool Loves A Fool” is as light and throwaway as anything he ever laid down, while the wistful “My Autumn's Done Come” (sample lyric: "Let those I-don't-care days come in, I'm tired of holding my stomach in") is as raw and honest. Despite MGM's best efforts, Hazlewood proved difficult to market without a Sinatra to temper his baritone drawl, and you'd suspect Hazlewood wasn't taking it quite as seriously as they might have hoped anyway. By 1967, Hazlewood had founded the LHI imprint and was busy building his own empire–one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, plus follow-ups Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause and Cure (1967) and Something Special (1968). Welcome, then, to Hazlewood's magnificent MGM years.
Lee Hazlewood - It's Cause And Cure
Lee Hazlewood
It's Cause And Cure
LP | 1967 | US | Reissue (Light In The Attic)
22,99 €*
Release:1967 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
The mid-to-late '60s were strange days for Lee Hazlewood. Having struck gold as songwriter and vocal foil for Nancy Sinatra, he signed up to MGM as an artist in his own right, and between 1966 and 1968, produced three ambitious solo albums that were eclectic, idiosyncratic, and most of all, unpredictable. It was a happy time for Lee; his music was hot on the charts, he was fully immersed in his collaboration with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom. The second of his MGM trilogy–1967's peculiarly named Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure–took on countrified French ye-ye (“The Girls In Paris”), a tale of a young bullfighter built on Spanish guitar and choral cowboys (“Jose”), a string-drenched song about the passing of time (“The Old Man And His Guitar”), and a western epic about a Native American tribe (“The Nights”). And that was just the first four tracks. Elsewhere, the honky tonk madness of “Suzi Jane Is Back In Town,” the Byrds-like jangle of “In Our Time” and–in the bonus tracks–an instrumental named “Batman” confirm this to be one of Hazlewood's most far-ranging, far-out LPs ever. It’s the result of two main factors: ambition–to top Phil Spector, primarily–and cash, which paid for orchestras, plush studios, and the inestimable talents of arranger Billy Strange. “I think the big sound of those records came out of the Spector thing,” says Hokom, in the new liner notes. “If you can have a big sound and you have money to burn… it was a flamboyancy.” Released before the Nancy & Lee LP–a bona fide hit for Reprise Records–Hazlewoodism was a tougher nut to crack, a record that confused by combining po-faced delivery with unabashed comical touches. By 1967, Hazlewood had founded the LHI imprint, and was busy building his own empire–one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, plus predecessor, The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and follow-up, Something Special. Welcome to Hazlewood's magnificent–and mad–MGM years.
Lee Hazlewood - There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
Lee Hazlewood
There's A Dream I've Been Saving: Lee Hazlewood Industries 1966 - 1971
Box Set | 2013 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
103,99 €*
Release:2013 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
For more than a year now, Light In The Attic has been reissuing the solo work of this true American moustachioed maverick. Beyond restored versions of Lee’s debut Trouble is a Lonesome Town and the soundtrack A House Safe for Tigers, the lid has also been lifted on the rich, little-explored archives of the label Lee Hazlewood Industries (LHI), when Hazlewood was svengali and super-producer to a stable full of brilliant artists.This landmark box set is the ultimate artifact for Lee Hazlewood heads new and old, containing a lavishly packaged, expansive 172-page LP sized hard cover book. But every good book deserves a soundtrack and in this case it comes in the form of a four-CD anthology of the LHI label, along with the never-before-released 1970 film Cowboy in Sweden on DVD. The CDs feature Hazlewood songs familiar and less so; surprising covers, doleful duets and little heard LHI gold.One of the most impressive aspects of the LHI box set is the gorgeous 12”x12” LP sized book (perfect for your record shelf), packed with rare beautiful pictures of Lee, his artists (and the occasional horse). The pages roll out the full story of the LHI label, including interviews with Lee and Suzi Jane Hokum, re-assessments of key Hazlewood albums, and artist profiles for the label’s roster, lovingly written by renowned L.A. music journalist/novelist Jessica Hundley. In the illuminating text, a picture of Hazlewood emerges – fiercely talented, brutally independent, a rare, ornery, ruthless and visionary man.A Deluxe Edition of the box set contains all of the above housed in a cloth-bound clamshell box with reproductions of LHI-era artifacts including press photos and a reproduction plane ticket used by Hazlewood back in ‘70. But the true icing on the cake is three data discs which include just about every 45 single and every LP ever released onLHI — in both WAV and MP3 formats. At around 17 albums and 72 singles (totaling 305 songs!), that’s a whole lot of Lee.The deluxe edition includes the following:172 Page Hard Cover Book:- LP-sized cloth bound book with gold foil stamp- Over 150 rare &
unseen photos
+ In depth essays - LHI history, album breakdowns, 27 artist profiles, LHI timeline, and interviews with Lee & dozens of label alum.Cowboy in Sweden The Film, on DVD (1970, 60 mins):- First time available. New digital transfer from the original 16mm master negative at the Swedish Broadcasting Co. Fully restored in HD with re-mastered sound. Region Free.4 CDs (107 Tracks):- Meticulously Re-mastered. Analog transfers captured at 24-bit/96-kHz. 95% of transfers from original analog master tapes (remainder transferred from mint vinyl). - DISCS 1 & 2: Everything Lee recorded for LHI, including every 45 single and album (Cowboy in Sweden, Forty, The Cowboy & The Lady, and Requiem For an Almost Lady), plus a handful of unreleased tracks.- DISCS 3 & 4: Key tracks from the LHI stable
 of artists, including Suzi Jane Hokom, The Kitchen Cinq, Ann-Margret, Honey Ltd., The International Submarine Band, Arthur, The Aggregation, Sanford Clark, Lynn Castle, The Surprise Package, Virgil Warner, and Hamilton Streetcar, amongst many others.- 14 unreleased tracksFrom Lee’s Personal ‘Stache:- Flexi disc featuring unheard Lee ‘studio chatter’ (“Play it like a cowboy song”)- Reproduction of Lee’s original embossed LHI business card- 5 random copies include a “Golden Ticket” for a free subscription to Light In The Attic’s Lee Hazlewood Archive Series
Lee Hazlewood - The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes & Backsides 1968-1971
Lee Hazlewood
The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes & Backsides 1968-1971
2LP | 2012 | US | Original (Light In The Attic)
26,99 €*
Release:2012 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
With his handlebar moustache and booming baritone, Lee Hazlewood was one of the defining stars of the late ‘60s. Though he’s perhaps best known for his work with Nancy Sinatra (including writing mega-hit “These Boots Are Made For Walking”), Hazlewood did stunning work away from that particular glamour queen and found latter day champions in Beck, Sonic Youth, and Jarvis Cocker. Now, for Record Store Day 2012, we are kicking off our excavation of the Lee Hazlewood archives with this anthology, Singles, Nudes & Backsides, collecting the best of Lee’s solo songs and duets from his LHI (Lee Hazlewood Industries) imprint.As a true legend of the great American songbook and a rebellious pioneer who left behind a lengthy trail of echo laden pop masterpieces, Lee’s influence continues to reverberate today. Between 1968-71, Hazlewood not only released his finest solo work, but produced numerous artists on LHI. From acid-folk and country-rock to pop-psych and soul, LHI issued dozens of long forgotten 45s and LPs. This series will include material from LHI (re-mastered for the first time from the original analog tapes), along with Lee’s output for other labels, rarities, unreleased gems, and the films of Torbjörn Axelman.See the sleeve: surrounded by nude girls, each wearing a fake moustache, Hazlewood wears a suit, ever-so-slightly awkwardly playing the role of the ‘60s playboy. Just like the picture, the songs present a man conflicted; he’s the tender-hearted romantic, the broken-hearted loser and the rugged cowboy, all in one. It’s there in the western swing of “Califia (Stone Rider)”, the loneliness of ”The Bed” and the bleak beauty of ”If It’s Monday Morning.” Hazlewood’s tremulous voice was made for duets (indeed, he wrote ”Some Velvet Morning”, one of the greatest of all time); here, Suzi Jane Hokom, Ann-Margret and Nina Lizell play counterpart to his manly tones.In the wonderful liner notes, written by British journalist Wyndham Wallace, the writer describes his friend Hazlewood as “a curmudgeonly, unpredictable sort at the best of times, as impatient with his own talent as he is with other people.” The Hazlewood Wallace knew was puzzled by the growing interest in him in the last two decades of his life, which was ended by cancer at age 78. That late flurry of interest saw him perform at the Royal Festival Hall in 1999, his first ever solo performance in the UK.A natural wanderer, Lee lived a big life, fighting in the Korean War, working as a radio DJ in Phoenix, Arizona, setting up Viv Records in the ‘50s, working as a big-shot LA producer in the ‘60s, signing Phil Spector to his Trey Records label and prematurely announcing retirement in the wake of the mid-‘60s British invasion. He didn’t: Nancy Sinatra came along, the hits started flowing and he continued producing characterful solo albums into the ‘70s, which saw his move to Sweden. By 2007, Hazlewood was living in Vegas, and begrudgingly enjoying that flurry of latter-day interest in his work. This landmark compilation promises to create many more converts.
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