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Bill Evans Jazz | Fusion 10 Items

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Bill Evans - New Jazz Conceptions
Bill Evans - Symbiosis
Bill Evans - Conversations With Myself
Bill Evans
Conversations With Myself
LP | 1963 | EU (Alternative Fox)
19,99 €*
Release:1963 / EU
Genre:Organic Grooves
The inventive and expressive pianist Bill Evans made significant and lasting impact in the jazz realm during a career that stretched from the late 1950s to the late 1970s. Born in Plainfield, New Jersey in 1929, his father’s alcoholism caused a disrupted childhood, though his musical talent was spotted early, leading to a scholarship at the Southeastern Louisiana University and the Mannes School of Music, where he majored in composition. Moving to New York in the mid-50s to work with George Russell, Evans’ breakthrough came via his membership of Miles Davis’ sextet, where his intense and melodic playing helped make Kind of Blue an outstanding landmark, during a time when he was also contributing to Chet Baker’s self-titled LP. Evans formed a popular trio with Scott LaFaro and Paul Motian, which was cut short after LaFaro tragically died in a car crash, leading to the creation of a new trio with Chuck Israels. Then, following collaborative albums with Cannonball Adderley, Eric Dolphy, Shelly Mann, Jim Hall and others, Evans recorded the concept album Conversations With Myself for Verve Records. Produced in a permissive atmosphere with Creed Taylor and engineer Ray Hall in February 1963 and subtitled A Searching Look into the Genius of Bill Evans, the album features a multi-tracked Evans playing only with himself on piano, with each track featuring an improvised second and third piano line, overdubbed atop what Evans laid down first. Reconstructed renditions of Theolonius Monk’s “‘Round About Midnight” and “Blue Monk” give way to “Theme From Spartacus” and Evans’ own “NYC’s No Lark”; this edition features two bonus tracks, the first a re-organized take of Monk’s “Bemsha Swing,” the second a rendition of the Broadway show tune, “A Sleepin’ Bee.”
Bill Evans - Autumn Leaves In Concert
Bill Evans - At The Montreux Jazz Festival
Bill Evans
At The Montreux Jazz Festival
LP | 2019 | US | Original (Acoustic Sounds)
44,99 €*
Release:2019 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
As others have noted, this album occupies a unique place in the Bill Evans discography. It's the only album to document drummer Jack deJohnette's too-short stay in the trio. The trio's performance on this album won them the 1969 Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group.
By the time this set was recorded, live in Montreux on June 15, 1968, Eddie Gomez and Evans had been playing together for two years. Gomez provided a different brand of virtuosity to that offered by Scott LaFaro in Evans's classic trio of five years earlier but he was clearly the best bass player Evans had worked with since LaFaro's tragic death. The groove between the two was deep and comfortable, so comfortable that in this set, Evans did something he hadn't done before, at least on a recording: he showcased Gomez for an entire piece, the almost seven minute long "Embraceable You".
As the liner notes by Gene Lees reveal, Evan's performance at the renowned jazz festival in the nightclub of the Montreux Casino, one of the most fashionable resorts in Switzerland, was one of his best. He and Gomez played with more exuberance, more happiness and more drive. Evans' brooding, introspective musical side has been represented well on records before; the bright side has been too-little heard, but it's here in this album.
At the end of each number the audience exploded in applause so stormy and extended that it had to be heavily edited for the album.
Enjoy this sparkling Bill Evans piano performance, made sweeter by the expert mastering by Bernie Grundman from the original analog tape. For this edition only the best vinyl pressing would do — a 200-gram super-silent luxurious-sounding platter from Quality Record Pressings, makers of the world's finest-sounding LPs. First-rate and top-notch, this album will make a superb addition to your record collection.
Bill Evans - On A Monday Evening
Bill Evans - The Bill Evans Album
Bill Evans
The Bill Evans Album
LP | 1971 | EU | Reissue (Speakers Corner)
28,99 €*
Release:1971 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The global corporation Columbia recorded and released only two LPs with pianist Bill Evans. A meagre result when one considers the numerous concerts that the new trio undertook between 1969 and 1974. Together with Eddie Gomez, a phenomenon on the bass, and drummer Marty Mortell, the three established a firm – and ever better – trio. Evans became interested in the possibilities offered by the Fender Rhodes piano and used it for the first time in "The Bill Evans Album".
The LP is remarkable in that only Evans’s own compositions were recorded – three previously recorded pieces and four brand-new works. Of particular note is the melancholy "Two Lonely People", Evans’s musical interpretation of a poem by Carol Hall. "Sugar Plum" and "T.T.T." were to remain in his repertoire right up until his very last recordings. Unusual but very commendable because it begins with an ad hoc introductory improvisation is the electric piano version of Evans’s most well-known composition – "Waltz For Debby".
The excellent technical facilities at the Columbia Studio were used to the full by Bill Evans, even though they were only recording a small ensemble. And that is why the seven numbers sound far better than most of the trio’s live recordings. And as Bill Evans once said, it was with this trio that he could fulfil his musical ambitions.
Bill Evans - Live At The Village Vanguard
Bill Evans - New Jazz Conceptions
Bill Evans - Conversations With Myself
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