INFOVAT ReductionCorona Updates
VINYL WEEKENDERVinyl for a special price – Only until Monday Sep. 28th, 23:59 CET
GenresNew In StockBack In StockPreorderHHV ExclusivesHHV Top 100ChartsSale

Born Bad Vinyl, CD & Tape 53 Items

Show Filter & CategoriesFilter Results
Sorting: Popular
96 Items/Page
La Femme - Psycho Tropical Berlin
V.A. - Tchic Tchic French Bossa Nova 1964/1973
V.A.
Tchic Tchic French Bossa Nova 1964/1973
2LP | 2020 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Ever since the late 1950s bossa-nova revolution, Brazil’s influence on French music has been undeniable. Pierre Barouh, Georges Moustaki and a vast array of lesser known artists, all made the Musica Popular Brasileira (mpb) an axis of promotion at the service of a cool and metaphysical, modern and mixed Brazilian lifestyle. Some were seduced by the poetic languors of the bossa, some were looking for fun, and others just loved the American hybridization of jazz-bossa, jazz-samba. What is bossa nova? One of its creators, Joao Gilberto said: “Its style, cadence, everything is samba. At the very start, we didn’t call it bossa nova, we sang a little samba made up of a single note – Samba de uma nota so …. The discussion around the origins of bossa nova is therefore useless”. It is nevertheless useful to remember that these magnificent Brazilian songs, which the guitarist describes as samba, were shifted and balanced around improbable chords. “I like things that lean, the in-betweens that limp with grace,” said Pierre Barrouh, quoting Jean Cocteau. With emotion, arrangements for violin and supple guitar licks, bossa nova rapidly changed. A transformation that can be heard in the Tchic, tchic, French Bossa Nova 1963-1974 compilation, the result of a cultural reappropriation, which traveled through the United States and supplemented itself in France. A musical revolution that has remained significant, bossa nova was born in Rio. From 1956 to 1961, Brazil lived through its golden years. In five years, the country had invented its modernist style. Elected president in 1956, Juscelino Kubitschek de Oliveira, an elegant man with a broad forehead, brandished a promising slogan: “Fifty years of progress in five years“. He quickly got to work. Not worried about increasing debt, he launched the project for a new federal capital, Brasilia, designed by the communist architect Oscar Niemeyer. Volkswagen opened state-of-the-art factories and created the “fusquinha”, the Beetle. In Rio, the Vespa made its first appearance. The Arpoador Surf Club crew run into the “girl” from Ipanema, Helô Pinheiro – the tanned garota (“chick”), between a Flower and mermaid, who at 17 walked by the Veloso bar, where the fiery author and composer, Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes, were getting drunk on whiskey. From then on, bossa symbolized cool. In 1958, Joao Gilberto recorded Chega de Saudade, which the directors of Philips denied, calling it “music for fagots“. The marketing director, who believed in it, secretly pressed 3000 78-inch vinyls and distributed them at schools around Rio, creating a tidal wave. American jazzmen then took over. In particular, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and guitarist Charlie Byrd. In November 1962, the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs funded a “Bossa-Nova” concert at Carnegie Hall in New York, inviting the genre’s pioneers. Unprepared, the show soon turned to disaster. But the troupe was invited to the White House by Jackie Kennedy. The first lady loved “the new beat” and in particular Maria Ninguem, a song by Carlos Lyra, later covered by Brigitte Bardot.
Jean-Pierre Mirouze - OST Le Mariage Collectif
V.A. - Moris Zekler Fuzz & Soul Sega From 70's Mauritius
V.A.
Moris Zekler Fuzz & Soul Sega From 70's Mauritius
LP | 2020 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves, Rock / Indie
Killer 13-track compilation of 70s music from Mauritius that evolved from the original sega genre - the music of the slaves as well as their descendants, sung to protest against injustices in Mauritian society. Created at the crossroads of Afro-Malagasy, the 70s strain fused Western and Indian cultures, pop, soul and funk arrangements, syncopated polyrhythms, saturated guitars, psychedelic organs and Creole vocals. Although the exact origins of sega remain unknown, it contains vocal and percussive practices that originated from Madagascar, Mozambique and East Africa. A social escape and a space for improvisation, satire and verbal jousting, it transcended everyday life and made room for the expression of conflicts and the transgression of taboos. The main instrument of sega is the ravanne, a large tambourine-like drum made of a large wooden frame and goat skin. It is accompanied by the maravanne, a rectangular rattle filled with seeds, and other homemade forms of percussion. Eric Nelson a solo guitarist and arranger, set up the band Features Of Life which, in the mid 70's, gave birth to a new sound. Fuzzy distorted guitars and funky beats invite each other to play over the unbridled beats created by fabulous drummer Raoul Lacariate. The band accompanied a new wave of singers, including the atypical Joseph Roland Fatime aka Ti L'Afrique, a hyperbolic and hyperactive character, a fan of blues and James Brown who launched an explosive raw, and funky style of sega.
V.A. - Chebran - French Boogie 82/89 Volume 2
V.A.
Chebran - French Boogie 82/89 Volume 2
2LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
22,49 €* 24,99 € -10%
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
"To succeed in life is to believe in this moment when all
is magic, when you're a giant; to succeed in life is to cross an ocean, not knowing
what for nor whom for, to be off on an adventure, quite simply" Bernard Tapie The
French in the 80s were not faint-hearted: as some threw themselves heart and soul
into music or business, others wouldn't mind going bottomless to get themselves
noticed_ While Bernard Tapie soon realized his own fortune was rather to be found
in business, many music-loving dreamers already imagined themselves in the sun, in
an enchanting world made of funky rhythms and synthesizers. While the French
National Front was growing in the shadow of François Mitterrand, these guys mixed
New York-style funk with electronic, Eastern or African sounds. These musicians
from all backgrounds - often lovers of "gentle pranking" as introduced by the newlylicensed
independent radio stations - were seeking the easy money they were told
about so much. With their genre-crossing arrangements and often chanted lyrics,
they brought honor to the "SOS Racisme" generation, unconsciously outlining the
nascent French contemporary urban culture. It must be said, the time was conducive
to all kinds of mixes: following the left's accession to power, many illegal immigrants
had just been sorted out, and Southern cultures were in vogue in all fields. The
French, while admiring Grace Jones' "savage beauty" in Jean-Paul Goude's
advertisements, were enjoying their freshly-gained fifth week of paid vacation,
tanning on the beaches of Maghreb. Following The Clash's example, punks and
rockers converted to reggae, and the new independent radios opened up their
programming to "world music". Even politicians - of all persuasions - frequented the
select Parisian nightclub Keur Samba to discreetly scheme with the future of
"Françafrique" to the sound of disco and exotic hits_
Francis Bebey - Psychedelic Sanza 1982-1984
Francis Bebey
Psychedelic Sanza 1982-1984
2LP | 2014 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2014 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Special compilation from Parisian re-issue kings, Born Bad, of the late Cameroonian master musician, Francis Bebey. This is the material we were hoping would follow the excellent comp from last year. Amazing 'universal' music currently only available on expensive originals. Double album with printed innersleeve.
Francis Bebey - African Electronic Music 1975-1982
Francis Bebey
African Electronic Music 1975-1982
2LP | 2012 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2012 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Cameroonian musician Francis Bebey is truly one of a kind. He entered the music scene with his african compositions for classical guitar. He gave recitals while pursuing a career in journalism and then as an international civil servant. The same creative impulse also led him to write pop songs, and some of which (based on novels he had written) became big hits in Africa and in the french-speaking world. But few people know that in the 1970s, Francis Bebey delved into electronic music. The first electronic keyboards, organs and drum machines offered him new possibilities of totally controlling his compositions. he embraced the technique of 'sound on sound' recording (recording several tracks, sequentially juxtaposed on the same tape). This new stage in his musical career included the production of several records ('savannah georgia,' 'new track', 'haiti'), rarities both for their creative explorations as well as their manifestations on vinyl. This was a particularly rich period for him, as he tested the limitless possibilities of the medium, and made use of surprising and novel instruments.
Vox Low - Relectures (Remixes)
La Femme - Mystere
La Femme
Mystere
2LP | 2016 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2016 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Returning with a more psychedelic sound and a range of guest vocalists that slice through the starkest of electro beats, 'Mystère' sees La Femme celebrating all that's wonderful about their city Paris. Recorded between a castle in Brittany and a Paris basement before being finished up with Sonny Diperri (Animal Collective) in LA, 'Mystère' once again sees backgrounds blurred and worlds collide. The band's chic retro-futurist surf-pop sound possesses the same dose of glamorous punk stomp as previously, but now layered with an elegant fusion of influences including Ennio Morricone, Marie Et Les Garcons, The Velvet Underground, oriental sounds, Turkish disco, Tuareg blues, medieval psychedelia, and mainstays s.a. Brian Eno and Pink Floyd.
V.A. - Cha Cha Au Harem - Orientica - France 1960/1964
V.A.
Cha Cha Au Harem - Orientica - France 1960/1964
LP | 2020 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
In 1963, David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia won seven Oscars. Launching its actors to stardom, including Peter O'Toole and Omar Sharif who played Prince Ali Ibn Kharish at the age of thirty. The latter incarnated the West's vision of ??the Middle East which was simultaneously elusive, refined and elegant. His fiery stare, impeccable mustache and immaculate haircut had something to do with it: the Egyptian actor was a sex symbol of an era passionate for James Bond and Oss117 spy adventures. In the Jordinian desert, he fascinated an audience that was in search of an escape and the thousand and one nights. This appetite for a colorful and fantasized exoticism, was also prominent in France's music of the sixties. The country that welcomed Omar Sharif's first feature films outside of Egypt (Goha, La Châtelaine du Liban) produced a delirious amount of music of Latin or Middle Eastern inspiration, grouped behind the genre named "typical" . This "typical" production is enough to scare away the most motivated and adventurous of listeners: overabundant and often blurry versions, anonymous performers (often accompanied by the same arrangers) and only a few noteworthy songs. Venturing into the moving waters of orchestral music undoubtedly causes disappointment, but here and there, springing up in the middle of a vast ocean, one can find a few cha-cha-cha pearls played in a Cuban or Middle Eastern style. The French equivalent of Exotica records (Les Baxter, Yma Sumac, Martin Denny etc.) for North Americans who were fantasizing about Hawaiian Tikis and the Pacific Islands, the oriental cha-cha-cha fueled dreams of the Middle East and Northern Africa. To rum-based cocktails sipped in a Polynesian setting, the French were to prefer couscous and mint tea. Carrying them across the Mediterranean to nearby Maghreb and even further on to the more mysterious Anatolia. Orientica in short. The context is somewhat paradoxical: decolonization, especially of the Maghreb was not an exactly smooth process. After Morocco and Tunisia...
Mazouni - Un Dandy En Exil - Algerie/France 1969/1983
Mazouni
Un Dandy En Exil - Algerie/France 1969/1983
2LP | 2019 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
21,99 €*
Release:2019 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
1958, in the middle of the liberation war. While the rattle of machine guns could be heard in the maquis, in the city, the population listened at low volume to Algerian patriotic songs broadcast by the powerful Egyptian radio: “The Voice of the Arabs”. These artists all belonged to a troupe created by the self-proclaimed management of the National Liberation Front (FLN), based in Tunis and claiming to gather a “representative” sample of the Algerian musical movement of the time, among which Ahmed Wahby (who sang Wahran Wahran, a song popularized by Khaled) and Wafia from Oran, Farid Aly the Kabyle, and H’sissen, the champion of Algiers’ Chaâbi. The same year, singer Ben Achour was killed in conditions that have never been elucidated.
Algiers, by a summer evening in 1960. Cafe terraces were crowded and glasses of anisette kept coming with metronomic regularity, despite the alarming music of police sirens heard at intervals and the silhouettes of soldiers marching in the streets. The mood was good, united by a tune escaping from everywhere: balconies, where laundry was finishing drying, windows wide open from apartments or restaurants serving the famous Algiers shrimps along with copious rosé wine. Couples spontaneously joined the party upon hearing “Ya Mustafa“, punctuated by improvised choirs screaming “Chérie je t’aime, chérie je t’adore“. The song, as played by Sétif-born Alberto Staïffi, was a phenomenal success, to the point that even FLN fighters adopted it unanimously. Hence an unfortunate misunderstanding that would trick colonial authorities into believing Mustafa was an ode to the glory of Fellaghas. In 1961, Cheikh Raymond Leyris, a Jewish grand master of ma’luf (one of Algeria’s three Andalusian waves) who was Enrico Macias’ professor, was killed in Constantine, making him the first victim of a terrorist wave that would catch up with Algeria at the dawn of the 1990s by attacking anything that thought, wrote or sang.
Mohamed Mazouni, born January 4, 1940 in Blida – “The City of Roses” both known for its beautiful ‘Blueberry Square’ (saht ettout) in the middle of which a majestic bandstand took center stage, and its brothels – had just turned twenty. He was rather handsome and his memory dragged around a lot of catchy refrains by Rabah Driassa and Abderrahmane Aziz, also natives of Blida, or by ‘asri (modern music) masters Bentir or Lamari. He would make good use of all these influences and many others stemming from the Algerian heritage.
The young Mohamed was certainly aware of his vocal limits, as he used to underline them: “I had a small voice, I came to terms with it!“. But it didn’t lack charm nor authenticity, and it was to improve with age. He began his singing career in those years, chosing bedoui as a style (a Saharan genre popularized among others by the great Khelifi Ahmed).
July 1962. The last French soldiers were preparing their pack. A jubilant crowd was proclaiming its joy of an independent Algeria. Remembering the impact of popular music to galvanize the “working classes”, the new authorities in office rewarded the former members of the FLN troupe by appointing them at the head of national orchestras. In widespread euphoria, the government encouraged odes to the recovered independence, and refrains to the glory of “restored dignity” sprung from everywhere. Abderrahmane Aziz, a star of ‘asri (Algiers’ yé-yé) was a favorite with Mabrouk Alik (“Congratulations, Mohamed / Algeria came back to you“); Blaoui Houari, a precursor of Raï music, praised the courage of Zabana the hero; Kamel Hamadi recalled in Kabyle the experience of Amirouche the chahid (martyr), and even the venerable Remitti had her own song for the Children of Algeria. All this under the benevolent eye (and ear) of the regime led by Ahmed Ben Bella, the herald of the single party and vigilant guardian of the “Arab-Islamic values” established as a code of conduct. Singers were praised the Egyptian model, as well as Andalusian art intended for a nascent petty bourgeoisie and decreed a “national classic”; some did not hesitate to sell out. These Khobzists – an Algerian humorous term mocking those who put “putting-food-on-the-table” reasons forward to justify their allegiance to the system – were to monopolize all programs and stages, while on the fringes, popular music settled for animating wedding or circumcision celebrations. Its absence in the media further strengthened its regionalization: each genre (chaâbi, chaouï, Kabyle, Oranian…) stayed confined within its local boundaries, and its “national representatives” were those whose tunes didn’t bother anyone. The first criticisms would emanate from France, where many Algerian artists went to tackle other styles. During the Kabyle-expression time slot on Radio Paris, Slimane Azem – once accused of “collaboration” – sang, evoking animals, the first political lines denouncing the dictatorship and preconceived thinking prevailing in his country. The reaction was swift: under pressure from the Algerian government, the Kabyle minute was cancelled. Even in Algeria, Ahmed Baghdadi aka Saber, an idol for fans of Raï music (still called “Oranian folklore”), was imprisoned for denouncing the bureaucracy of El Khedma (work).
For his part, Mazouni was to be noticed through a very committed song: Rebtouh Fel Mechnak (“They tied him to the guillotine”). But above all, the general public discovered him through a performance at the Ibn Khaldoun Theater (formerly Pierre Bordes Theater, in the heart of Algiers), broadcast by the Algerian Radio Broadcasting, later renamed ENTV. This would enable him to integrate the Algerian National Theater’s artistic troupe. Then, to pay tribute to independence, he sang “Farewell France, Hello Algeria”.
June 19, 1965: Boumediene’s coup only made matters worse. Algeria adopted a Soviet-style profile where everything was planned, even music. Associations devoted to Arab-Andalusian music proliferated and some sycophantic music movement emerged, in charge of spreading the message about “fundamental options”. Not so far from the real-fake lyricism epitomized by Djamel Amrani, the poet who evoked a “woman as beautiful as a self-managed farm”. The power glorified itself through cultural weeks abroad or official events, summoning troubadours rallied to its cause. On the other hand, popular music kept surviving through wedding, banquets and 45s recorded for private companies, undergoing censorship and increased surveillance from the military.
As for Mazouni, he followed his path, recording a few popular tunes, but he also was in the mood for traveling beyond the Mediterranean: “In 1969 I left Algeria to settle in France. I wanted to get a change of air, to discover new artistic worlds“. He, then, had no idea that he was about to become an idolized star within the immigrant community.
France. During the 1950s and 1960s, when parents were hugging the walls, almost apologizing for existing, a few Maghrebi artists assumed Western names to hide their origins. This was the case of Laïd Hamani, an Algerian from Kabylia, better known as Victor Leed, a rocker from the Golf Drouot’s heyday, or of Moroccan Berber Abdelghafour Mociane, the self-proclaimed “Vigon”, a hack of a r&b voice. Others, far more numerous, made careers in the shadow of cafes run by their compatriots, performing on makeshift stages: a few chairs around a table with two or three microphones on it, with terrible feedback occasionally interfering. Their names were Ahmed Wahby or Dahmane El Harrachi. Between the Bastille, Nation, Saint-Michel, Belleville and Barbès districts, an exclusively communitarian, generally male audience previously informed by a few words written on a slate, came to applaud the announced singers. It happened on Friday and Saturday nights, plus on extra Sunday afternoons.
In a nostalgia-clouded atmosphere heated by draft beers, customers – from this isolated population, a part of the French people nevertheless – hung on the words of these musicians who resembled them so much. Like many of them, they worked hard all week, impatiently waiting for the weekend to get intoxicated with some tunes from the village. Sometimes, they spent Saturday afternoons at movie theaters such as the Delta or the Louxor, with extra mini-concerts during intermissions, dreaming, eyes open, to the sound of Abdel Halim Hafez’ voice whispering melancholic songs or Indian laments made in Bombay on full screen. And the radio or records were also there for people to be touched to the rhythm of Oum Kalsoum’s songs, and scopitones as well to watch one’s favorite star’s videos again and again.
Dumbfounded, Mohamed received this atmosphere of culture of exile and much more in the face. Fully immersed in it, he soaked up the songs of Dahmane El Harrachi (the creator of Ya Rayah), Slimane Azem, Akli Yahiaten or Cheikh El Hasnaoui, but also those from the crazy years of twist and rock’n’roll as embodied by Johnny Hallyday, Les Chaussettes Noires or Les Chats Sauvages, not to mention Elvis Presley and the triumphant beginnings of Anglo-Saxon pop music. Between 1970 and 1990, he had a series of hits such bearing such titles as “Miniskirt”, “Darling Lady”, “20 years in France”, “Faded Blue”, Clichy, Daag Dagui, “Comrade”, “Tell me it’s not true” or “I’m the Chaoui”, some kind of unifying anthem for all regions of Algeria, as he explained: “I sang for people who, like me, experienced exile. I was and have always remained very attached to my country, Algeria. To me, it’s not about people from Constantine, Oran or Algiers, it’s just about Algerians. I sing in classical or dialectal Arabic as much as in French and Kabyle”.
Mazouni, a dandy shattered by his century and always all spruced up who barely performed on stage, had greatly benefited from the impact of scopitones, the ancestors of music videos – those image and sound machines inevitably found in many bars held by immigrants. His strength lay in Arabic lyrics all his compatriots could understand, and catchy melodies accompanied by violin, goblet drum, qanun, tar (a small tambourine with jingles), lute, and sometimes electric guitar on yé-yé compositions. Like a politician, Mazouni drew on all themes knowing that he would nail it each time. This earned him the nickname “Polaroid singer” – let’s add “kaleidoscope” to it. Both a conformist (his lectures on infidelity or mixed-race marriage) and disturbing singer (his lyrics about the agitation upon seeing a mini-skirt or being on the make in high school…), Mohamed Mazouni crossed the 1960s and 1970s with his dark humor and unifying mix of local styles. Besides his trivial topics, he also denounced racism and the appalling condition of immigrant workers. However, his way of telling of high school girls, cars and pleasure places earned him the favors of France’s young migrant zazous.
But by casting his net too wide, he made a mistake in 1991, during the interactive Gulf War, supporting Saddam Hussein’s position through his provocative title Zadam Ya Saddam (“Go Saddam”). He was banned from residing in France for five years, only returning in 2013 for a concert at the Arab World Institute where he appeared dressed as the Bedouin of his beginnings.
At the end of the 1990s, the very wide distribution of Michèle Collery and Anaïs Prosaïc’s documentary on Arabic and Berber scopitones (first on Canal+, then in many theaters with debates following about singing exile), highlighted Mazouni’s important role, giving new impetus to his career. Rachid Taha, who covered Ecoute-moi camarade, Zebda’s Mouss and Hakim with Adieu la France, Bonjour l’Algérie, as well as the Orchestre National de Barbès who played Tu n’es plus comme avant (Les roses), also contributed to the recognition of Mazouni by a new generation.
Living in Algeria, Mohamed Mazouni did not stop singing and even had a few local hits, always driven by a “wide targeting” ambition. This compilation, the first one dedicated to him, includes all of his never-reissued “hits” with, as a bonus, unobtainable songs such as L’amour Maâk, Bleu Délavé or Daag Dagui.1958, in the middle of the liberation war. While the rattle of machine guns could be heard in the maquis, in the city, the population listened at low volume to Algerian patriotic songs broadcast by the powerful Egyptian radio: “The Voice of the Arabs”. These artists all belonged to a troupe created by the self-proclaimed management of the National Liberation Front (FLN), based in Tunis and claiming to gather a “representative” sample of the Algerian musical movement of the time, among which Ahmed Wahby (who sang Wahran Wahran, a song popularized by Khaled) and Wafia from Oran, Farid Aly the Kabyle, and H’sissen, the champion of Algiers’ Chaâbi. The same year, singer Ben Achour was killed in conditions that have never been elucidated.
Algiers, by a summer evening in 1960. Cafe terraces were crowded and glasses of anisette kept coming with metronomic regularity, despite the alarming music of police sirens heard at intervals and the silhouettes of soldiers marching in the streets. The mood was good, united by a tune escaping from everywhere: balconies, where laundry was finishing drying, windows wide open from apartments or restaurants serving the famous Algiers shrimps along with copious rosé wine. Couples spontaneously joined the party upon hearing “Ya Mustafa“, punctuated by improvised choirs screaming “Chérie je t’aime, chérie je t’adore“. The song, as played by Sétif-born Alberto Staïffi, was a phenomenal success, to the point that even FLN fighters adopted it unanimously. Hence an unfortunate misunderstanding that would trick colonial authorities into believing Mustafa was an ode to the glory of Fellaghas. In 1961, Cheikh Raymond Leyris, a Jewish grand master of ma’luf (one of Algeria’s three Andalusian waves) who was Enrico Macias’ professor, was killed in Constantine, making him the first victim of a terrorist wave that would catch up with Algeria at the dawn of the 1990s by attacking anything that thought, wrote or sang.
Mohamed Mazouni, born January 4, 1940 in Blida – “The City of Roses” both known for its beautiful ‘Blueberry Square’ (saht ettout) in the middle of which a majestic bandstand took center stage, and its brothels – had just turned twenty. He was rather handsome and his memory dragged around a lot of catchy refrains by Rabah Driassa and Abderrahmane Aziz, also natives of Blida, or by ‘asri (modern music) masters Bentir or Lamari. He would make good use of all these influences and many others stemming from the Algerian heritage.
The young Mohamed was certainly aware of his vocal limits, as he used to underline them: “I had a small voice, I came to terms with it!“. But it didn’t lack charm nor authenticity, and it was to improve with age. He began his singing career in those years, chosing bedoui as a style (a Saharan genre popularized among others by the great Khelifi Ahmed).
July 1962. The last French soldiers were preparing their pack. A jubilant crowd was proclaiming its joy of an independent Algeria. Remembering the impact of popular music to galvanize the “working classes”, the new authorities in office rewarded the former members of the FLN troupe by appointing them at the head of national orchestras. In widespread euphoria, the government encouraged odes to the recovered independence, and refrains to the glory of “restored dignity” sprung from everywhere. Abderrahmane Aziz, a star of ‘asri (Algiers’ yé-yé) was a favorite with Mabrouk Alik (“Congratulations, Mohamed / Algeria came back to you“); Blaoui Houari, a precursor of Raï music, praised the courage of Zabana the hero; Kamel Hamadi recalled in Kabyle the experience of Amirouche the chahid (martyr), and even the venerable Remitti had her own song for the Children of Algeria. All this under the benevolent eye (and ear) of the regime led by Ahmed Ben Bella, the herald of the single party and vigilant guardian of the “Arab-Islamic values” established as a code of conduct. Singers were praised the Egyptian model, as well as Andalusian art intended for a nascent petty bourgeoisie and decreed a “national classic”; some did not hesitate to sell out. These Khobzists – an Algerian humorous term mocking those who put “putting-food-on-the-table” reasons forward to justify their allegiance to the system – were to monopolize all programs and stages, while on the fringes, popular music settled for animating wedding or circumcision celebrations. Its absence in the media further strengthened its regionalization: each genre (chaâbi, chaouï, Kabyle, Oranian…) stayed confined within its local boundaries, and its “national representatives” were those whose tunes didn’t bother anyone. The first criticisms would emanate from France, where many Algerian artists went to tackle other styles. During the Kabyle-expression time slot on Radio Paris, Slimane Azem – once accused of “collaboration” – sang, evoking animals, the first political lines denouncing the dictatorship and preconceived thinking prevailing in his country. The reaction was swift: under pressure from the Algerian government, the Kabyle minute was cancelled. Even in Algeria, Ahmed Baghdadi aka Saber, an idol for fans of Raï music (still called “Oranian folklore”), was imprisoned for denouncing the bureaucracy of El Khedma (work).
For his part, Mazouni was to be noticed through a very committed song: Rebtouh Fel Mechnak (“They tied him to the guillotine”). But above all, the general public discovered him through a performance at the Ibn Khaldoun Theater (formerly Pierre Bordes Theater, in the heart of Algiers), broadcast by the Algerian Radio Broadcasting, later renamed ENTV. This would enable him to integrate the Algerian National Theater’s artistic troupe. Then, to pay tribute to independence, he sang “Farewell France, Hello Algeria”.
June 19, 1965: Boumediene’s coup only made matters worse. Algeria adopted a Soviet-style profile where everything was planned, even music. Associations devoted to Arab-Andalusian music proliferated and some sycophantic music movement emerged, in charge of spreading the message about “fundamental options”. Not so far from the real-fake lyricism epitomized by Djamel Amrani, the poet who evoked a “woman as beautiful as a self-managed farm”. The power glorified itself through cultural weeks abroad or official events, summoning troubadours rallied to its cause. On the other hand, popular music kept surviving through wedding, banquets and 45s recorded for private companies, undergoing censorship and increased surveillance from the military.
As for Mazouni, he followed his path, recording a few popular tunes, but he also was in the mood for traveling beyond the Mediterranean: “In 1969 I left Algeria to settle in France. I wanted to get a change of air, to discover new artistic worlds“. He, then, had no idea that he was about to become an idolized star within the immigrant community.
France. During the 1950s and 1960s, when parents were hugging the walls, almost apologizing for existing, a few Maghrebi artists assumed Western names to hide their origins. This was the case of Laïd Hamani, an Algerian from Kabylia, better known as Victor Leed, a rocker from the Golf Drouot’s heyday, or of Moroccan Berber Abdelghafour Mociane, the self-proclaimed “Vigon”, a hack of a r&b voice. Others, far more numerous, made careers in the shadow of cafes run by their compatriots, performing on makeshift stages: a few chairs around a table with two or three microphones on it, with terrible feedback occasionally interfering. Their names were Ahmed Wahby or Dahmane El Harrachi. Between the Bastille, Nation, Saint-Michel, Belleville and Barbès districts, an exclusively communitarian, generally male audience previously informed by a few words written on a slate, came to applaud the announced singers. It happened on Friday and Saturday nights, plus on extra Sunday afternoons.
In a nostalgia-clouded atmosphere heated by draft beers, customers – from this isolated population, a part of the French people nevertheless – hung on the words of these musicians who resembled them so much. Like many of them, they worked hard all week, impatiently waiting for the weekend to get intoxicated with some tunes from the village. Sometimes, they spent Saturday afternoons at movie theaters such as the Delta or the Louxor, with extra mini-concerts during intermissions, dreaming, eyes open, to the sound of Abdel Halim Hafez’ voice whispering melancholic songs or Indian laments made in Bombay on full screen. And the radio or records were also there for people to be touched to the rhythm of Oum Kalsoum’s songs, and scopitones as well to watch one’s favorite star’s videos again and again.
Dumbfounded, Mohamed received this atmosphere of culture of exile and much more in the face. Fully immersed in it, he soaked up the songs of Dahmane El Harrachi (the creator of Ya Rayah), Slimane Azem, Akli Yahiaten or Cheikh El Hasnaoui, but also those from the crazy years of twist and rock’n’roll as embodied by Johnny Hallyday, Les Chaussettes Noires or Les Chats Sauvages, not to mention Elvis Presley and the triumphant beginnings of Anglo-Saxon pop music. Between 1970 and 1990, he had a series of hits such bearing such titles as “Miniskirt”, “Darling Lady”, “20 years in France”, “Faded Blue”, Clichy, Daag Dagui, “Comrade”, “Tell me it’s not true” or “I’m the Chaoui”, some kind of unifying anthem for all regions of Algeria, as he explained: “I sang for people who, like me, experienced exile. I was and have always remained very attached to my country, Algeria. To me, it’s not about people from Constantine, Oran or Algiers, it’s just about Algerians. I sing in classical or dialectal Arabic as much as in French and Kabyle”.
Mazouni, a dandy shattered by his century and always all spruced up who barely performed on stage, had greatly benefited from the impact of scopitones, the ancestors of music videos – those image and sound machines inevitably found in many bars held by immigrants. His strength lay in Arabic lyrics all his compatriots could understand, and catchy melodies accompanied by violin, goblet drum, qanun, tar (a small tambourine with jingles), lute, and sometimes electric guitar on yé-yé compositions. Like a politician, Mazouni drew on all themes knowing that he would nail it each time. This earned him the nickname “Polaroid singer” – let’s add “kaleidoscope” to it. Both a conformist (his lectures on infidelity or mixed-race marriage) and disturbing singer (his lyrics about the agitation upon seeing a mini-skirt or being on the make in high school…), Mohamed Mazouni crossed the 1960s and 1970s with his dark humor and unifying mix of local styles. Besides his trivial topics, he also denounced racism and the appalling condition of immigrant workers. However, his way of telling of high school girls, cars and pleasure places earned him the favors of France’s young migrant zazous.
But by casting his net too wide, he made a mistake in 1991, during the interactive Gulf War, supporting Saddam Hussein’s position through his provocative title Zadam Ya Saddam (“Go Saddam”). He was banned from residing in France for five years, only returning in 2013 for a concert at the Arab World Institute where he appeared dressed as the Bedouin of his beginnings.
At the end of the 1990s, the very wide distribution of Michèle Collery and Anaïs Prosaïc’s documentary on Arabic and Berber scopitones (first on Canal+, then in many theaters with debates following about singing exile), highlighted Mazouni’s important role, giving new impetus to his career. Rachid Taha, who covered Ecoute-moi camarade, Zebda’s Mouss and Hakim with Adieu la France, Bonjour l’Algérie, as well as the Orchestre National de Barbès who played Tu n’es plus comme avant (Les roses), also contributed to the recognition of Mazouni by a new generation.
Living in Algeria, Mohamed Mazouni did not stop singing and even had a few local hits, always driven by a “wide targeting” ambition. This compilation, the first one dedicated to him, includes all of his never-reissued “hits” with, as a bonus, unobtainable songs such as L’amour Maâk, Bleu Délavé or Daag Dagui.
Nino Nardini / Eddie Warner / Roger Roger - Space Oddities 1972-1982
Nino Nardini / Eddie Warner / Roger Roger
Space Oddities 1972-1982
LP | 2016 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
16,99 €*
Release:2016 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves, Electronic / Dance, Soundtracks
During the '60s and '70s, three distinguished gentlemen who had built their careers playing French-made exotic jazz (Roger Roger, Nino Nardini and orchestra leader Eddie Warner) met each evening in the Ganaro recording studio. They mainly experimented -or simply played- with keyboards that looked like prototypes of spaceships. Flying high on whimsical and joyful inspiration, the improbable trio used their strange instruments to sketch out the beginnings of something that, at that time, resembled the future of music. This collection presents some of the highlights that resulted from their light-hearted, electronic pop sessions.
Guerre Froide - Guerre Froide
Guerre Froide
Guerre Froide
LP | 2015 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
13,99 €*
Release:2015 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
This French cold wave classic gets reissued on vinyl for the first time. Thanks to this re-release, minimal synth connoisseurs will be happy they won't have to cough up 200 Euros to include these essential tracks in their collections.
V.A. - Dirty French Psychedelics
V.A.
Dirty French Psychedelics
LP | 2009 | EU | Reissue (Born Bad)
15,29 €* 16,99 € -10%
Release:2009 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Pop
Repress of compilation of 60's psychedelic pop tunes, selected by Dirty Sound System and released under the banner of 'Dirty French Psychedelics'.
V.A. - Mobilisation Generale - Protest And Spirit Jazz From France 1970-1976
V.A.
Mobilisation Generale - Protest And Spirit Jazz From France 1970-1976
2LP | 2013 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
19,79 €* 21,99 € -10%
Release:2013 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
While singles from the Stones, Who, Kinks and MC5 provided an incendiary soundtrack for the revolution, it was Black Americans who truly blew the world from its foundations in the 60s. Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler and Archie Shepp left behind the jazz of their fathers' generation, liberating the notes, trashing the structures, diving headfirst into furious improvisations, inventing a new land without boundaries - neither spiritual nor political. Free jazz endowed the saxophone with the power to destroy the established order. In 1969, the Art Ensemble of Chicago arrived at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier in Paris and a new fuse was lit. Their multi-instrumentalism made use of a varied multiplicity of "little instruments" (including bicycle bells, wind chimes, steel drums, vibraphone and djembe: they left no stone unturned), which they employed according to their inspirations. The group's stage appearance shocked as well. They wore boubous (traditional African robes) and war paint to venerate the power of their free, hypnotic music, directly linked to their African roots. They were predestined to meet up with the Saravah record label (founded in 1965 by Pierre Barouh), already at the vanguard of as-yet unnamed world music. Brigitte Fontaine's album Comme à la radio, recorded in 1970 after a series of concerts at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier, substantiated the union of this heiress to the poetic and politically committed chanson francaise (Magny, Ferré, Barbara) with the Art Ensemble of Chicago's voodoo jazz and the Arab tradition perpetuated by her companion Areski Belkacem.
Clothilde - French Swinging Mademoisell
Clothilde
French Swinging Mademoisell
LP | 2013 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2013 / EU – Original
Genre:Pop
A super enjoyable album for anyone into sunny, feel-good '60s pop!
Use - Selflic
Use
Selflic
LP | 2018 | FR | Original (Born Bad)
15,99 €*
Release:2018 / FR – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Martial pianos, mongoloid harpsichords, rural techno, social horror: this new record contains all it takes to writhe, sweat, shudder, pant, stagger, pick yourself up, crawl, howl, faint, get up and pick yourself up again – in short, to have fun. We’ll spare you the truisms about "stepping out of his comfort zone", about the "darkened atmosphere" or a "chiaroscuro self-portrait": Selflic is a perfect digest of what Usé was, is, and will probably be for a long time: a terrific machine to crush time and bullshit, to invoke the essential precepts of fire and fury. And that's all you need to know. The rest is just noise.
Vox Low - Vox Low
Vox Low
Vox Low
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
18,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
This is a time for punk urgency, for depressed minimal Krautrock, for the great shamanic
hypnosis. This bunch of greasers from the Porte de St Ouen area now perform as Vox
Low, with Jean-Christophe Couderc (vocals and synth) and Benoît Raymond (legendary
bass guitar, guitar, synth), later joined by Mathieu Autin (infernal drums and voodoo
percussions) and Guillaume Léglise (savage SG guitar, synths as well) for setting up live
performances. Indeed for Vox Low, stage performance is a founding act. It even has to
do with pure ceremony, which quickly brought the band its cult aura. Seeing the combo
on stage is an act of faith, a celebration of dark forces. Far from lazy live performances
on Ableton, Vox Low is like an acid-house version of the Jesus & Mary Chain on stage.
After having been the heartthrobs of Andrew Weatherall (whom they've remixed), after
being remixed by the black angel Ivan Smagghe, after releasing maxi-singles on Jennifer
Cardini's techno label and on the brilliant Evrlst, Vox Low is now turning up on an
insolently rock'n'roll label. Which is just logical, being one of the few bands able to
stylishly surf between 60s rockabilly influences and cold, minimal techno from around
Cologne or Berlin's Zoologischer Garten Station.
V.A. - Antilles Mechant Bateau
V.A.
Antilles Mechant Bateau
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
16,14 €* 18,99 € -15%
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
The West Indies - a sweet coastline subject to many clichés from another time. That postcard with coconut trees, a glass of rum to sip on, those so exotic madras dresses... Almost as many as in Compagnie Créole's "doudouist" songs, that say a lot about the misunderstandings from both sides of the ocean. West Indians are still as stuck with this distorted outlook as in the good old days of the colonies. Because, underneath the veneer of moldy images, a completely different reality is woven. 'They beat drums but were never number one' - to misquote the chorus by a Martinique-born French singer. This is the subject of this collection - musicians drumming on percussion as a way of asserting their creolized identity. Songs that tell, in veiled terms, a different reality from what mainlanders were fed with. Special cases, with cries of joy and laments accompanied by cadences, as an invitation to trance, all immersed in the Caribbean melting pot of rhythm.
Bernard Estardy - Space Oddities 1970-1982
Bernard Estardy
Space Oddities 1970-1982
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves, Rock / Indie
A master of the mixing board, from the late '60s until the '90s Bernard Estardy was the wizard of French musical recordings. As head of CBE studios, he shaped everything from Gérard Manset's concept albums to Claude François' hit singles, Françoise Hardy's delicate tear-jerkers and Michel Sardou's soul-stirrers. This "giant" had his hand in the whole range of mainstream French music by making his studio a veritable playground for experimentation. His legendary album 'La Formule Du Baron,' released in 1969, and the eight LPs of production music he made between 1974 and 1978 for Tele Music are vivid proof.
V.A. - Disque La Raye
V.A.
Disque La Raye
LP | 2017 | FR | Original (Born Bad)
16,99 €*
Release:2017 / FR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
This cool release
compiles some of the best tunes in Creole boogaloo. The charm
of the restored sound of these old 7-inches is only matched by
the ardor of the interpretations. Like no music genre ever
before, boogaloo brought together African Americans and
Latinos, who already attended the same parties, but danced to
different tunes. Indeed, boogaloo overtook the West Indies with
amplified keyboards and electrified guitars, and this new wave
knocked out hierarchy and habits.
V.A. - Chebran: French Boogie 1980-1985
V.A.
Chebran: French Boogie 1980-1985
2LP | 2015 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
19,79 €* 21,99 € -10%
Release:2015 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Squeezed in between the age of disco and that of modern electronic music, French Boogie was a transitional phase, but it remains an amazingly refreshing testimony to the intermingling of pop and underground cultures. The genre was hastily categorized as anecdotal in spite of its pioneering synthetic groove and matchless bass lines. An attentive ear will discover the poetry of the ephemeral beyond the eccentricities of the genre, as well as a certain unexpected avant-gardism. Always cheerful and catchy, French Boogie is what you need to party.
Cha Cha Guitri - French Synth Wave - St. Etienne 1981
Cha Cha Guitri
French Synth Wave - St. Etienne 1981
LP | 2014 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
15,99 €*
Release:2014 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
A release of '80s new-wave from France, with a bit of sunshine. These electro retro-futuristic songs have that slight sweet and sour flavour, somewhere between casual and sophisticated.
V.A. - BIPPP French Synth Wave 79/85
Wizzz - Volume 2
Wizzz
Volume 2
LP | 2008 | FR | Original (Born Bad)
14,44 €* 16,99 € -15%
Release:2008 / FR – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves, Rock / Indie
psychorama francais 166-70 feat. San Antonio, Serge Franklin, Zorgones, Bruno Leys, Jean et Janet, ... incl. booklet!
Julien Gasc - L'appel De La Foret
Pleasure Principle - Pleasure Principle
Pleasure Principle
Pleasure Principle
LP | 2019 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
19,19 €* 23,99 € -20%
Release:2019 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
I’m going to say “I” because I think I can’t write about my music other than in the first person. I’ve been playing drums since I was fifteen years old and I’ve always had bands since. Even if I always contribute artistically, to different degrees, my latitude of action, from a creative point of view, has always been limited by the fact that I am a drummer. Like many people, I learned to play very approximately the guitar and keyboard, and I spent years going over obsessions and recurring patterns, in my room and in my head, without doing any of that, and knowing that even though I was and still am extremely involved in my past and present bands (Skategang, La Secte du Futur, Marietta to a lesser extent, and ), the music we were making was only partially representative of me. I’ve always listened to a lot of reggae, dancehall, music from Ghana, Nigeria, Congo, and overall music that is based more on repetition and intention than composition, and that’s something I could never really develop in there.
In 2015 my brother and friend Benjamin Dupont, the human behind Bryan’s Magic Tears, moved into my flat share / Noah’s Ark at 35 rue Clignancourt, in the 18th arrondissement, and it was him who unlocked everything by showing me how to record music by myself ; and one September morning, lying on my back, I saw the light.
It’s really a new world that’s opened up to me, I started recording at a pretty intensive pace, just letting myself be carried away by what I’ve had in my head and fingers for years; I’ve accumulated a lot of material, including a lot of unfinished pieces, and I’ve tried – I’m still trying – to understand for myself what my point really is and to learn how to systematize and channel my obsessions to make it something personal.
Recording a lot, without any constraints of format, group or expectations, by letting myself be totally carried away by what was coming out in the moment, it allowed me to give myself a certain insight into myself; I am not one of the people who compose music by having an idea of where they want to go, but by repeating the exercise, something coherent ends up taking shape. I would say that it oscillates, for the music, between synthetic krautrock, dancehall lo-fi, Manchester sound recorded with toys, rock à la Velvet and Memphis rap for children; and between Les Négresses Vertes and Julien Gracq for the texts. I still write the basis of my lyrics without music, and I attach a lot of importance to it; French has become obvious because I want to say something true and I would not be able to do it otherwise – even if the text of “The Fur” is in English, but it was to seduce a girl (it didn’t work), and it won’t happen again. This is my friend Paula from J.C. Satan and Succhiamo, who sings on “Mariposa” and “Venera 16”, because I had no idea what to do about it; I sent her the songs and she sang on her phone, it was great so we recorded it.
This first album is a kind of best-of from 2015 to 2018, the songs that held up best, the ones I had lyrics on, the best finished drafts, basically. I owe its existence to my friends at the Megattera micro-label who, after hearing my songs at home at night, decided to release them confidentially on tape first; without them, they would still be on my hard drive. Under the spell, Born Bad Records then entrusted Olivier Demeaux de Cheveu/ Heimat with the mission of mixing the “best” tracks to give them the lustre they deserve and make these few crazy and scattered tracks a full-fledged album. I asked Adam Karakos, from Villejuif Underground, Guillaume Rottier, from Rendez-Vous, Nikolaj Boursniev, from Quetzal Snakes, and Milia Colombani, who plays in half the bands in Paris, to play live with me.
Pleasure Principle is located somewhere within a triangle formed by Francis Bebey, Add (n) To X and Ludwig Von 88; it is a solitary race to the outside, an ode to the forward flight, a way to escape in the peaceful expectation of the great liberating flash. I often find myself dancing like a monkey who forgets the world when I record at night in my room, and I hope to provoke the same reaction in people.
Paul Speedy Ramon
Pierre Vassiliu - En Voyages
Pierre Vassiliu
En Voyages
LP | 1975 | EU | Reissue (Born Bad)
21,59 €* 23,99 € -10%
Release:1975 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
“Voyage”, to Pierre Vassiliu, was not only the title of an album of his, but also a philosophy of life. Travels were not for vacation or rest. They were synonyms of meetings, new music and sometimes, simply, life. These experiences around the world nourished his work, and his career allowed him to set foot on every continent. But his most beautiful travels took place in recording studios.
“My parents showed up on a beach, with a camper. They landed there and we stayed for years.” Sitting by a lake in Sète, Lena Vassiliu recounts how her parents Pierre and Laura chose an empty spot in the Casamance region to enjoy a few years loving each other under the sun. The legitimate child of this trip, she was conceived in Senegal. At the time, her mother said: “I want to give birth standing on my feet, holding a tree, in the sacred wood where only women can enter!” Today her mother adds: “Pierre was reluctant, so we ended up in a private hospital in Dakar.” Laura Vassiliu still lives in the same apartment in Sète. Folon’s original drawing for the artwork of the ‘Voyage’ LP is framed in the living room, making Pierre’s ghost more present. Laura remembers well the beautiful moments, and travels were a part of them. “Not only the moments were beautiful. On trips, he was more beautiful as well.” Pierre felt good turning his back on France – which was probably already ugly –, turning his back on the fickle, mercantile record industry, as well as on an entourage that recognized his mustache but not his talent. A traveler out of obligation in his youth (Algeria and its war), he became a traveler by taste and acquired an interest in people, an essential for anyone willing to travel the Globe. He also traveled out of necessity. When smiles faded, a boat, a plane, and bye bye idiots. And he brought all those trips back into his songs.
“Anytime we traveled anywhere, music attracted us. Pierre sensed the rhythm of the country we were in and he found a song.” Laura Vassiliu
Chevance - Outremusique Pour Enfants 1974/1985
Chevance
Outremusique Pour Enfants 1974/1985
LP | 2019 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
15,99 €*
Release:2019 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Another Music for Children / 1974-1985
In the land of Presidents Giscard and Mitterand, thermal clothing and elbow pads, Sautet films and Sunday roasts, the carpeting of a nursery is strewn with a handful of 7-inches. There, exotic birds and courteous elephants guarding a castle built with cakes form a Front for the Liberation of the Imaginary: colourful, systematically framed illustrations standing out against the cream background of gatefold sleeves… doorways to a maze of sounds at the crossroads between the neatest form of chanson and the most prospective jazz.
Founded in the course of the 1970s by Philippe Gavardin, the small collection named Chevance is above all the story of buddies who were out and about between the twilight of the Trente Glorieuses and the disenchantment that followed the socialists’ rise to power, gravitating around this mentor known for his kindness and curiosity. Originally a linguist, Gavardin was one of these open-minded intellectuals, with one foot in the Contrescarpe cabarets and the other in step with the avant-garde, combining his apparently classical tastes with a keen interest in the novelties of his time. It is notably with Jean-Louis Méchali—a drummer from the free jazz scene who became Gavardin’s team-mate and arranged a good deal of the releases—that he forged the identity of this series of recordings for the younger generations: musically janus-faced, definitely literary, impregnated with a surrealism that echoed the decade’s psychedelic and libertarian experiments. The label developed a real editorial policy disregarding commercial constraints. Each record took a clear direction: modern fables, bestiaries, musical tales, cookbooks… Words were the backbone and every release was both carefully designed and perfectly manufactured.
Several teams were built up in the course of meetings which were more like congenial brainstormings. In the chanson category, Anne and Gilles, a duet regularly performing in the left bank area, alternated with the Swiss actress Cristine Combe who had recently settled in Paris and wanted to sing Kurt Weill. As for the folk projects, Imbert and Moreau, who were more in the hippie vein, took turns with the canonical pioneer Steve Waring, whose famous Grenouilles were then turning round and round in José Arthur’s Pop Club. The musicians included many a jazzman from some of the most adventurous factions of the French scene: Méchali’s fellow travellers involved in the Cohelmec Ensemble; The Marvelous Band, a gang from Lyon that had also co-founded the “Association à la Recherche d’un Folklore Imaginaire” (Association in Search of an Imaginary Folklore); and various mavericks like multi-instrumentalist Teddy Lasry, or the intriguing, so often credited Jacques Cassard, whose track seems to have been completely lost today.
Initially distributed by the label Le Chant du Monde, Chevance was definitely included in the catalogue of this venerable parent company when Gavardin started directing it. Thus, it joined a selection of traditional music and work songs also including chanson, poetry and recordings that just can’t be categorised. While bookshops for kids knew a historic boom in France, the collection eventually enjoyed the monopoly of the prizes awarded by “Loisirs Jeunes” or the Charles Cros Academy, a key factor to reach school and library networks.
If the collection gives a striking change from mass-produced music for kids, its spirit is nevertheless akin to other singular attempts that were made at the time.
Mixing songwriting and avant-garde jazz, Chevance seems to be, first of all, Saravah’s younger sibling. Founded by Pierre Barouh, Saravah showed the same balance between moderation and radicalism, with oddities like those of Brigitte Fontaine, Alfred Panou, Barney Willen and so many other musicians feeding the creative frenzy that characterised the French jazz scene.1 As the Cohelmec Ensemble bridged the two worlds, the teams got to know one another and often worked in the same studios.
As for the literary dimension, it is right in the lineage of the American iconoclastic publisher Harlin Quist, whose activity in France left its mark on the genre. Similar selections, a common taste for playful uses of language, and the same distancing from both conventional and outcome-based education… A universe excluding the mundane to make room for cosmogonic visions in which, at the turn of each page, everyday life is relentlessly assaulted by the incongruous. The parallelism with Chevance goes even beyond questions of editorial, graphical or typographical choices: the two worked with the same team of illustrators, which included Henri Galeron, Nicole Claveloux and Patrick Couratin.
While Chevance had strong literary roots, Le Chant du Monde developed, in the middle of the 1980s, another collection in a more abstract, rigorously instrumental line, far from textual concerns.
Initiated by Anne H. Bustarret, a critic, a major activist in the field of creation for kids and a friend of Gavardin’s, Sonoriage openly campaigned for ”an active initiation to the listening and reading of today’s music based on the attention to every day sonic environments.” Inspired by the many situations she experienced in workshops and the hundreds of hours she spent stirring the imagination of children with a bunch of keys hanging at the end of a string, Bustarret carefully presented each record, systematically adding an illustrated, notebook-like insert to guide the kids’ listening.
Bernard Baschet—the sound sculptor who invented, along with his brother François, the “crystal” bearing their name, and worked with Pierre Schaeffer on the typology of sound objects for the Treatise on Musical Objects—was an old friend of Anne Bustarret’s. She therefore naturally turned to him for the Musiques de table project, before he oriented her towards Jean-François Gaël. A cornerstone of the amazingly hybrid band Sonorhc, a student of acousmatics and a first-class arranger who had worked for many of the decade’s singers, Gaël was a crystal lover who followed Baschet around his interventions, including in schools.
When Gaël set to work, Bustarret called the composer Alain Savouret, asking him to select excerpts from his tape-recorded Sonate Baroque, so as to compile another volume entitled Musiques en Bande. Renaud Gagneux, who was in charge of the Louvre’s carillon, had just been ringing his bells for Musiques sur la place when she contacted the outsider naturalist Knud Viktor about a project which, unfortunately, was never carried out.
As a rather up-to-date though not-so-commercially-successful collection, Sonoriage constitutes a kind of ideal illustration of François Delalande’s theories.2 This very serious member of the GRM also worked as a research supervisor at the National Audiovisual Institute. His theories emphasised the unexpected parallelism between the methods of the most respectable practitioners of concrete music and the way the youngest children explore their sonic environment.
Necessarily incomplete and subjective, this very partial overview deliberately draws attention to the most peculiar tracks. Unfortunately, some equally valuable works could not be included: Jean-Louis Méchali and François Ruy-Vidal’s Petit Poucet (a monolithic musical tale that cannot be sized down), Colette Magny’s rough and raucous lullabies, B-sides from the Antifables series, La Promenade de Picasso, a record that had to be destroyed and therefore seems definitely lost… May the most curious listeners feel like putting these fragments back in their broader context so as to (re)discover the vast inheritance this uncommon project bequeathed us.
Wild Classical Music Ensemble - Tout Va Bien Se Passer
Le Villejuif - Underground
Le Villejuif
Underground
LP | 2018 | Original (Born Bad)
15,99 €*
Release:2018 / Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
11 clumsy love letters to heavy backpacks, haunted castles, sleepy parisian districts and tours in China - which happened by total chance, thanks to some girl found asleep on their couch on new years eve. 11 reasons to think there’s a way out of 2019 - already. Your stormy love story with the Villejuif Underground starts here.
Bryan Magic Tears - 4 Am
Bryan Magic Tears
4 Am
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Remember those moth-eaten American bands on unreachable Midwest labels that, in the mid-1990s, would drop choruses that would make the Smashing Pumpkins green with envy, with the crummiest sound in the history of electricity? Maybe not. Well, Bryan's Magic Tears could have been one of them. This project launched four years ago by Benjamin Dupont (Dame Blanche), which features members and ex-members of La Secte Du Futur and Marietta, indeed has it all to occupy this niche, which, by the way, has quite fallen into disuse these days: toxic melodies, guitars oscillating between whiplashes and caresses, ghostly sonorities and a convoluted name referring to some obscure Parisian acid dealer. But wait: this is not about a vain stylistic exercise put together by some gifted kids who fantasize about a time they missed, nor a sad revivalist meeting of old farts who still haven’t gotten over turning 40. If listening to Bryan's Magic Tears brings the 90s to mind, it's not because of the sound – which, as it happens, is very close to that of their tour partners Le Villejuif Underground or Jessica93 – but because of a state of mind that was peculiar to the time and to this particular moment in adolescence, when the last illusions aroused by the fall of the Berlin Wall were slowly fading away, when the dark clouds of the first Gulf War were piling up; this carefree, jaded spleen perfectly depicted in Gregg Araki's films or in songs by Sebadoh, Beat Happening or Nirvana – or even in this famous line from Lou Reed's "Romeo Had Juliet": "It's hard to give a shit these days ". A state of mind that remains pure, intact, limpid in Bryan's Magic Tears music, free from any posture or cynicism, at the service of insane titles – real hazy hits forged in some triumphant fire – which made their first album, released late 2016 on XVIII Records, one of the most beautiful records to come out of the French independent scene in the 2010-2020 season. And we find it again today, even more intense and precise on xxxx, a collection of insane hits – “Ghetto Blaster", "CEO", "Changes", the whole album could actually be mentioned. A record made for those clear and cool days of spring when everything suddenly looks brighter, clearer and more intense. A record that recalls what it feels like to miss the last train of the day and realize you are just short of what it would cost to buy a ticket for the next day. An obvious, indestructible, lunar, romantic, arrogant, phlegmatic, disillusioned record. In short, a record that makes you wish you were 18 again. How many bands could be talked about like that, these days? PRs & managers would kill for such a story - this one is 100 % accurate and happened just like any great story : by chance. Just like the music of the Villejuif Underground, the result of happy accidents and unholy alliances, something that was never meant to be but became an astonishing fandango of sorts. Think Fat White Family covering Oingo Boingo with Beat Happening’s gear. Think Beck’s One Foot In The Grave remixed by Daniel Johnston and Brian Wilson. Think Ausmuteants, the Spits, the Feeling Of Love or A Frames when they really nailed it. Actually, you shouldn’t think about any of this cause whatever you do, you’ll still be far from reality. Way too far. Especially now with the release of When Will The Flies In Deauville Drop?, their second album and the first one on Born Bad Records. 11 tracks in a bit less than 40 minutes. 11 clumsy love letters to heavy backpacks, haunted castles, sleepy parisian districts and tours in China - which happened by total chance, thanks to some girl found asleep on their couch on new years eve. 11 reasons to think there’s a way out of 2019 - already. Your stormy love story with the Villejuif Underground starts here. Be sure to enjoy it. To the max.
Cannibale - Not Easy To Cook
Cannibale
Not Easy To Cook
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
18,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
If Cannibale's members brought their breakfast back up when talking about 'Not Easy To Cook', their listeners would be surprised. There's a world of difference between the beginning of Cannibale's success story and this second album. The most surprising thing about 'Not Easy To Cook' is the sultriness that emerges. It's hard to sum it up other than by comparing these 10 songs with some pressure cooker in which bits of dancehall, London ska and Hawaiian dub would have cooked together. Here's the small miracle achieved by this LP recorded by the band in its remote French village: sounding French, but Polynesian French. A very psychedelic mixture of cumbia, African rhythms and garage music. Or, if you will, a kind of missing link between Fela Kuti, The Doors and The Seeds!
Cyril Cyril - Certaine Ruines
Cyril Cyril
Certaine Ruines
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
A muezzin without borders, Cyril Yeterian came to the disheveled world through Mama Rosin, a three-piece that stirred the ghosts of the rogue bayou, the clammy Mardi Gras of some electric Louisiana. Soon, the world fell in love with their flair. Within the same space-time, Cyril Bondi hit the road. Diatribes, La Tène, Insub Meta Orchestra, the most adventurous projects of the Geneva scene all had a bone to pick with this percussionist in search of unheard beats. A single word, a single cry can say a lot, as long as it is soulful. The sound of a duo reduced to its simplest expression - rhythm, a riff, a voice - can bear within itself an infinitely luxuriant musical organism - the double helix of DNA. Cyril Cyril, so real, so rich.
Frustration - Midlife Crisis/Sad Face
Frustration
Midlife Crisis/Sad Face
7" | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
9,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Post punk at its best by one of the best current French bands. Think Warsaw meets Wire meets The Fall with insane electronic touches and you will already have a good idea of their musical universe. Raw and powerful. Second press with slightly different artwork.
V.A. - Des Jeunes Gens Modernes 1978-1983 Volume 2
Pierre Sandwidi - Le Troubadour De La Savane 1978 / 1982
Pierre Sandwidi
Le Troubadour De La Savane 1978 / 1982
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
17,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Fresh Nigerian synth-funk from Burkina Faso, recorded sometime between the late '70s and early '80s. These groovy dancing sounds, killer keys and slow burners will kill you softly. Pierre Sandwidi stands as one of the finest Voltaic artists from the 1970s. He belonged to an unsung elite of Francophone artists such as Francis Bebey, G.G. Vickey, Amédée Pierre, André-Marie Tala, Pierre Tchana or Mamo Lagbema. His entire released output consists of less than ten 7 inches, two LPs and a bunch of cassettes. A man from the provinces, he always favored social engagement and carefully crafted lyrics over instant fame. His words and music challenged General Lamizana's dreary presidency, which ruled the country from 1966 to 1980.
J.C. Satan - Centaur Desire
J.C. Satan
Centaur Desire
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
16,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
As we know, first times are always the most powerful: the shattering rush of revelation can only be experienced once. After that it's all an inevitable, exhausting quest for repetition, a feverish search for the original shock, and pointless reiteration and accumulation poisoned by consciousness, analysis and age: and such a sensation keeps fading as we experience it. 2018's garage band #1001 will look and sound the same as the preceding one, and leave you wondering -half-sorry, half-dismayed- how on earth listening to the Sonics and the Standells could electrify you back in the days. Likewise, you can count on the fingers of one hand the bands you've loved up until their 5th album like J.C. Satàn - almost ten years after falling in love. We all already know dudes who have "seen them too much", heard them too much and stopped expecting anything from them anymore. Except that those folks are in for a big-time surprise, as the Satàn crew did not deliver a 5th album just for the hell of it, just to justify their next tour: they got together to seek the rare fuel, the miraculous current able to galvanize our sleeping senses, the electroshock forcing us to revive the urgent impression of being alive. 'Centaur Desire' has something of a new first-time record.
Pierre Vassiliu - Face B - 1965/1981
Pierre Vassiliu
Face B - 1965/1981
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
14,44 €* 16,99 € -15%
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Pop
Compilation album by French singer and songwriter Pierre Vassiliu (the man behind 'Les Masques' and tons of other cool projects).
Forever Pavot - La Pantoufle
Forever Pavot
La Pantoufle
LP | 2017 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
15,99 €*
Release:2017 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
2017 album by Forever Pavot, the brain-child and solo venture of Emile from the Parisian psych/prog band Arun Tazieff. Musically Emile blends influences from both '60s and contemporary psych, Ennio Morricone, French and Italian movie soundtracks, library music and more.
Group Doueh & Cheveu - Dakhla Sahara Sessions
Frustration - Empires Of Shame
El'Blaszczyk Rock Band Himself - The Quirky Lost Tapes 1993-1995
El'Blaszczyk Rock Band Himself
The Quirky Lost Tapes 1993-1995
LP | 2016 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
16,99 €*
Release:2016 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
A collection of bizarre avant-garde garage-rock, recorded by El'Blaszczyk in the early '90s, together with his 10 year old sister and his neighbour. The result is vaguely reminiscent of the universe of actor/director Jean Yanne, the comedian music group Les Charlots, and humoristic singer Boby Lapointe.
Dorian Pimpernel / Forever Pavot / Julien Gasc - Moonshine
J.C. Satan - J.C. Satan
J.C. Satan
J.C. Satan
LP | 2015 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
11,99 €* 15,99 € -25%
Release:2015 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Brutal and complex, furious and spirit-evoking, making spikes then descending, this album strikes the nail of black-garage-gospel with the hammer of Viking gods, right in the middle of a storm of decibels that lance the climate, electrically charged by each of J.C. Satan's coming shows.
V.A. - WIZZZ French Psychorama 1967 - 1970 Volume 3
Feeling Of Love - Reward Your Grace
Feeling Of Love
Reward Your Grace
LP | 2013 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
14,99 €*
Release:2013 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Since its beginning, The Feeling Of Love evolved from a one-man-band playing minimal and nihiliste garage blues with a no wave borrowing, to a trio still in the garage vibe but with more complexity and stronge krautrock and psychelic influences. The band, mostly based in Metz (France), comes from the mind of Guillaume Marietta, who was joined by Seb Normal and Sebastien Joly for their first studio album released through Born Bad Records in april 2011. Dissolve Me (also released on Kill Shaman Records in USA) is the band's kraut space garage manifesto. Songs stretch out, the drums go more tribal, the synth hammers out his keys on an infinite highway, and the guitar gets lost in delay pedal's fog. One thinks Suicide, Spacemen 3, The Velvet Underground, Can, Syd Barrett. After countless shows all over Europe and two tours in U.S.A., sharing the stage with bands such as Ty Segall, Thee Oh Sees, White Fence, The Intelligence, Girls, Strange Boys etc., The Feeling Of Love will release early 2013 a new album titled Reward Your Grace. Even if the songs keep their psychedelic and melancolic garage essence, the band re-think their music by exploring shoegaze and pop territories. Reward Your Grace is a much more light full records, more accomplish but never steady. Something between psyche pop balades and long sound tracks of trance disturbed by sonic blasts.
Frustration - Uncivilized
V.A. - WIZZZ French Psychorama 1966-1970 Volume 1
Intelligence - Crepuscule With Pac-man
Frustration - Relax
Frustration - Full Of Sorrow
V.A. - Des Jeunes Gens Modernes 1978-1983 Volume 1
V.A.
Des Jeunes Gens Modernes 1978-1983 Volume 1
LP | 2008 | EU | Original (Born Bad)
16,99 €*
Release:2008 / EU – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
Post Punk, Cold Wave and Culture Novö in France 1978-1983!
Back To Top
Tracklist
Tracklist
Close Player