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Comb & Razor Sound Organic Grooves 3 Items

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Rock Town Express - Funky Makossa
Rock Town Express
Funky Makossa
LP | 2017 | US | Original (Comb & Razor Sound)
21,99 €*
Release:2017 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
In 1973, EMI Records Nigeria released the 45 rpm disc “Fuel for Love” b/w “Soundway,” credited to a mysterious band called Wrinkar Experience. The record was a finely-crafted gem of pop-rock and funky soul as had never before been heard coming out of the country’s nascent rock scene, and it ended up being the biggest selling Nigerian single up until that point. The success of Wrinkar Experience effectively demonstrated that was a market for homegrown pop and rock, and sent record labels scrambling to sign similar bands, kicking off the Nigerian rock revolution that is still being celebrated and discovered by new generations today.

But while Wrinkar Experience launched the movement, the group itself would be short-lived: after another hit single in 1973, the band’s frontman Danie Ian split for a solo career. The remaining principal players in the group—Cameroonian musicians Ginger Forcha and Edjo’o Jacques Racine—tried to keep the Wrinkar name going before giving it up and rebranding themselves as Rock Town Express.

Rock Town Express’s debut LP Funky Makossa was recorded in 1974 for ARC Records, the cutting-edge studio and label established in Lagos by English drum legend Ginger Baker. The album showcased in long format the qualities that had only been hinted at on the Wrinkar Experience singles: bright, confident pop melodies, articulate lyrics, and darkly potent funk-rock.

Comb & Razor Sound is proud to present a new, fully-authorized reissue of Funky Makossa, featuring the seven tracks from the original release, plus “I Am A Natural Man” and “I Don’t Want To Know,” from Wrinkar Experience’s seldom-heard third and final single.
Foundars 15 - Fire Woman
Foundars 15
Fire Woman
LP | 1977 | US | Reissue (Comb & Razor Sound)
21,99 €*
Release:1977 / US – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The 1970s in Nigeria were an age when mighty bands walked the earth. In Lagos, afro-rock stalwarts such as BLO and Monomono ruled the roost, eastwards, it was deeply funky groups like The Funkees, The Apostles and The Friimen. Up north you had soulful ensembles such as The Elcados and The Moonrakers. And in the southeast, you had Foundars 15.
Foundars 15 were not the only rock band operating in the southern city of Port Harcourt, but they were without question the tightest and most eclectic not just in Port Harcourt but perhaps in Nigeria as a whole. Formed initially as an army band in the wake of the Nigerian civil war of 1967-1970, Foundars 15 released a string of singles in the early seventies, followed by four albums of heavy, jittery funk-rock between 1976 and 1978 before splitting up to pursue solo careers.
1977’s Fire Woman is perhaps the finest (and rarest) of Foundars 15’s albums, offering a spicy buffet of groovy pop, reggae, native rock and dense, off-kilter funk. Long sought after by aficionados, Fire Woman has been an LP that is more often heard about than actually heard.
That is about to change.
Comb & Razor Sound is proud to present a new, fully-authorized reissue of Fire Woman, featuring eight crucial cuts representing the gold standard of the golden age of Nigerian pop music. Here’s your chance to catch the fire!
Shango Dance Band - Shango Dance Band
Shango Dance Band
Shango Dance Band
LP | 2017 | US | Original (Comb & Razor Sound)
24,99 €*
Release:2017 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
In the early years of Fela Kuti's career, well before he would define the genre of afrobeat, and leave an indelible mark on the musical landscape, he was a struggling trumpet player, seeking to redefine the sound of his current group, the art-jazz ensemble Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet. As he moved his group towards the then-popular genre of highlife in 1963, he lost his bassist in the move towards commercial success, but gained the company of Ojo Okeji, who had a sterling reputation both as a bassist and
percussionist in groups like Lagos Cool Cats, Rex Williams' Nigerian Artistes, and Western Toppers Highlife Band, a favorite of Kuti's. Okeji impressed Kuti with his deft jazziness on the bass, so he was in on the spot, and the Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet became Koola Lobitos. It was Okeji that introduced Kuti to the famed percussionist Tony Allen, (Who would subsequently join Kuti into his greatest years as an artist) as well as conguero Abayomi "Easy" Adio. During his time in Koola Lobitos, Okeji not only contributed deeply melodic, and adeptly rhythmic baselines, but brought his own influence from emerging US soul artists like James Brown & The Famous Flames and Wilson Pickett, heavily pushing Koola Lobitos towards a more soulful direction. This push was often resisted by Kuti, who frequently clashed with Okeji. 1968 proved to be a turning point for the group, as the Nigerian Civil War broke out, and many starving musicians turned to the military for work. Okeji and Adio would leave for the army, while Kuti and Allen kept Koola Lobitos going, where it evolved through different names and iterations and grew into the worldwide afrobeat force that made Kuti an icon during the 70s and 80s. But as Kuti and Allen rose to global recognition, Okeji and Adio would form a new band within the ranks of the 6th Infantry Brigade of the Nigerian Army. Their emblazoned blue jackets earned them the nickname "The Blues”, but Okeji preferred the name “Shango” after the Yoruba thunder god. Shango took the fundamentals of Kuti's famous afrobeat and brought new layers of guitar and horn arrangements, while often invoking supernatural aesthetics, and maintaining a love for the US soul artists that influenced Okeji so much. Because Shango was an army band however, their records were not readily available to anyone outside of the military so their music, including their eponymous 1974 LP, remained relatively unknown even amongst the people of Nigeria. Decades later Comb & Razor is thrilled to present this long-lost Nigerian gem for the first time to a world-wide audience.
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