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Matsuli Organic Grooves 6 Items

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Okay Temiz / Johnny Dyani - Witchdoctor's Son
Okay Temiz / Johnny Dyani
Witchdoctor's Son
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
25,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Martina Lussi’s second album fuses together disparate sound sources with a disorienting
quality that reflects the modern climate of dispersion and distraction. The Lucerne, Switzerland- based sound artist released her debut album ‘Selected Ambient’ on Hallow Ground in 2017, and now comes to Latency with a bold new set of themes and processes.

The range of tools at her disposal spans field recordings, processed instrumentation, synthesised elements and snatches of human expression. The guitar is a recurring figure, subjected to a variety of treatments from heavy, sustained distortion to clean, pealing notes. Elsewhere the sound of sports crowds and choral singing merge, and patient beds of drones and noise melt into the sounds of industry and mechanics. The track titles manifest as a compositional game of deception complete with innuendos, empty phrases and claims – flirtations with perfume names and ironic assertions.

From the volatile geopolitical climate to the changing nature of music consumption in the face of streaming and digital access, ‘Diffusion is a Force’ is a reflection on fractured times where familiar modes and models change their meaning with the ever-quickening pace of communication.
Moses Taiwa Molelekwa - Genes And Spirits
Moses Taiwa Molelekwa
Genes And Spirits
2LP | 2018 | UK | Original (Matsuli)
35,99 €*
Release:2018 / UK – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Genes and Spirits: herald of a new South African jazz.

When pianist and composer Moses Taiwa Molelekwa died in February 2001, fans and fellow musicians alike were swept away by grief. He was so young – not yet 30 – and had shown such musical promise.
Genes and Spirits was his second album, released a year before his death. While the composer’s voice and pianist’s touch are instantly recognisable from his debut, Finding One’s Self, the ideas underlying the music mark a conscious step into the unknown: what he called “finding a range of rhythmic alternatives,” inspired by the rhythmic complexity he was hearing in both pan-African music and the New Music he had been exploring in Europe; and by the possibilities of electronic club music – jungle in London, and kwaito in Soweto.

Inspired like many of his musical age-mates by the optimism of the post-liberation 1990s in South Africa, Taiwa crafted what he described as ragga with a kalimba groove; Tswana vocals over a programmed drum
track; a duet with Chucho Valdez and more, across eleven tracks combining the talents of multiple South African and world musicians, including Valdez, Flora Purim and Cameroonian drummer Brice Wassy. With Genes and Spirits, Molelekwa was stepping into the kind of genre-busting territory we associate today with players such as Robert Glasper, but he was doing it almost a decade earlier: asserting a new jazz identity that was young, popular and African. This re-release also includes one additional track, Wa Mpona, recorded for, but omitted from, the original release.

Remastered by Frank Merritt at the Carvery, Genes and Spirits is presented as a deluxe gatefold sleeve including new liner notes by Gwen Ansel.

“Think Robert Glasper - only ten years earlier.” Gwen Ansell

“Helped define the new cool.” The Guardian

“Heartily recommended.” All About Jazz
Bheki Mseleku - Celebration
Bheki Mseleku
Celebration
2LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Matsuli)
33,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Shortlisted for the 1992 Mercury Prize. First time on vinyl in a 180g deluxe gatefold edition. New liner notes from Francis Gooding with unpublished photographs. Remastered from the original master tapes by Frank Merritt at the Carvery /Celebration’s release trumpeted the emerging dawn of South Africa’s epochal changes. Sainted and blessed, Bheki Mseleku appeared as the herald of a new era, a prophet of rebirth and reconnection. This is a work signalling transition and change, and a sign of a South African music that was properly reconnected with global currents – a music that could journey far beyond the stifling combination of exile and oppression in which it had been bound.

Recognising Bheki as a kindred spirit to her late husband, Alice gave him the saxophone mouthpiece that John Coltrane had used during the recording of A Love Supreme. Coltrane was a permanent touchstone for the pianist, one of the few who Bheki felt had the same esoteric and spiritual focus as himself: ‘the only musicians I know of who were deeply into this were Coltrane, and Pharoah and Sun Ra’, he told an interviewer in 1992.

While the idioms of post-Coltrane spirit jazz are certainly to the fore on Celebration, they are energised by a swift and original musical vision, quite specific to Bheki’s music, in which whole musical systems – the marabi and mbhaqanga jazz of the townships, American jazz, European classical, and more – are seamlessly mended together by the pianist’s quicksilver musical sensibility and legendary technical ability.

Celebration was originally released on compact disc and cassette in the middle of 1992 by World Circuit. It was Bheki’s first statement under his own name, and the first recorded presentation of his personal musical vision. This vision had been tempered across two decades which had combined intense professional playing with profound personal trials in both the spiritual and earthly domains, all set against the greater backdrop of South African political turmoil and exile in Europe.

The band brought together musicians hailing from three signally important points within the interconnected, communicating spaces of the Black Atlantic continuum – North America, post-colonial Britain, and southern Africa. With them, Mseleku created the first major South African-led musical statement to be produced after the sufferance of exile was ended. The ultimate and most egregious remnant of the centuries-long colonial era, apartheid, was finally being dismantled as they played. At this critical point, Mseleku’s musical spirit work, channelled from a higher source, spoke of a time to come where all divisions might be transcended by a greater unity.
Pacific Express - Black Fire
Pacific Express
Black Fire
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
26,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Militant jazz, fusion, funk and soul from mid-seventies Manenberg, outside Cape Town, with a set of roots in club dance traditions like ballroom ('langarm'), Khoisan hop-step and the whirling 'tickey draai' ('spin on a sixpence') of the mine camps; others in jazz-rock and the New Thing, from Santana and Chicago to Shepp and Coltrane.
Black Disco - Night Express
Black Disco
Night Express
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
29,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Insurgently crossing Philly Soul, Cape Jazz and bump jive in 1976, the same year as the Soweto Uprising; poignantly shot through with Timmy Thomas’ Why Can’t We Live Together. ‘It was so important for us to play a kind of crossover then, to weave in touches of Motown, Philadelphia soul and Teddy Pendergrass that the coloured community appreciated, and Basil’s Cape Town sound, and Sipho’s sound that was legendary in the black community, and make music that people could all enjoy together… The regime divided us: people classified coloured had identity documents; black people had the dompas. We didn’t accept that separation. Sipho, although he was born in KZN, could play any feel. Sometime he’d joke, Does my bass line feel coloured enough?’ Another landmark Matsuli. The title track is killer.
Soul Jazzmen, The - Inhlupeko (Distress)
Soul Jazzmen, The
Inhlupeko (Distress)
LP | 1969 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
29,99 €*
Release:1969 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Another unmissable, scorching Matsuli revive! Tete Mbambisa and co, chasing the mbaqanga in Trane. Five originals and Love For Sale, from Johannesburg, 1969. ‘Both urban Africans and urban Americans were consciously crafting ‘modern’ music – and in South Africa’s case, it was a modernism deliberately and defiantly set in opposition to the narrow, backwards-looking parochialism of apartheid, where some white universities did not even permit gender-mixed dancing until the 1970s. The sophisticated, snappily-dressed black players of South Africa’s cities in the 1960s were not trying to ‘be like’ America; rather, they were enacting in their performance, and reaching through their horns for what a new South Africa might sound like.’ 180g vinyl with excellent sound; photographs from the Ian Bruce Huntley archive and concert bills; extended notes. Pure worries — ‘inhlupeko’ means ‘distress’ — very warmly recommended.
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