SNEAKER DEALGet 25% off selected styles – Code: sneakerdeal25
GenresNew In StockBack In StockPreorderhhv.de Exclusiveshhv.de Top 100ChartsSale

Matsuli Organic Grooves 4 Items

Sorting: Popular
96 Items/Page
Black Disco - Night Express
Black Disco
Night Express
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
29,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Insurgently crossing Philly Soul, Cape Jazz and bump jive in 1976, the same year as the Soweto Uprising; poignantly shot through with Timmy Thomas’ Why Can’t We Live Together. ‘It was so important for us to play a kind of crossover then, to weave in touches of Motown, Philadelphia soul and Teddy Pendergrass that the coloured community appreciated, and Basil’s Cape Town sound, and Sipho’s sound that was legendary in the black community, and make music that people could all enjoy together… The regime divided us: people classified coloured had identity documents; black people had the dompas. We didn’t accept that separation. Sipho, although he was born in KZN, could play any feel. Sometime he’d joke, Does my bass line feel coloured enough?’ Another landmark Matsuli. The title track is killer.
Soul Jazzmen, The - Inhlupeko (Distress)
Soul Jazzmen, The
Inhlupeko (Distress)
LP | 1969 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
29,99 €*
Release:1969 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Another unmissable, scorching Matsuli revive! Tete Mbambisa and co, chasing the mbaqanga in Trane. Five originals and Love For Sale, from Johannesburg, 1969. ‘Both urban Africans and urban Americans were consciously crafting ‘modern’ music – and in South Africa’s case, it was a modernism deliberately and defiantly set in opposition to the narrow, backwards-looking parochialism of apartheid, where some white universities did not even permit gender-mixed dancing until the 1970s. The sophisticated, snappily-dressed black players of South Africa’s cities in the 1960s were not trying to ‘be like’ America; rather, they were enacting in their performance, and reaching through their horns for what a new South Africa might sound like.’ 180g vinyl with excellent sound; photographs from the Ian Bruce Huntley archive and concert bills; extended notes. Pure worries — ‘inhlupeko’ means ‘distress’ — very warmly recommended.
Batsumi - Batsumi Clear Vinyl Edition
Batsumi
Batsumi Clear Vinyl Edition
LP | 1974 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
23,99 €*
Release:1974 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Matsuli Music continues its reissue program of rare indigenous afro-jazz sounds from South Africa with the release of Sowetan group Batsumi's self-titled debut from 1974. The reissue has been lovingly re-mastered from the original tapes.The album arrived amidst a period of intense political, intellectual and artistic ferment stimulated in large part by the teachings of Steve Biko and the Black Consciousness Movement. ‘“Say it loud! I’m black and I’m proud”. This is fast becoming our modern culture,’ wrote Biko in 1971, ‘a culture of defiance, self assertion and group pride and solidarity.’ Drawing partly on the insights of Frantz Fanon and the poets of Négritude, and partly on the contemporary US Black Power politics of figures such as Eldridge Cleaver and Stokely Carmichael, Biko forged a visionary and potent message of South African redemption, pride and defiance. It took culture to its heart, and the wake of Biko’s message a burgeoning arts scene rooted in the black and African experience began to flourish. Batsumi is a masterpiece of spiritualised afro-jazz, and a prodigious singularity in the South African jazz canon. There is nothing else on record from the period that has the deep, resonant urgency of the Batsumi sound, a reverb-drenched, formidably focussed pulse, underpinned by the tight-locked interplay of traditional and trap drums, and pushed on by the throb of Zulu Bidi’s mesmeric bass figures. The warm notes of Johnny Mothopeng’s guitar complete a soundscape that is at once closely packed with sonic texture and simultaneously vibrating with open space, and in whose shimmer and haze Themba Koyana and Tom Masemola soar. A sonorous echo emanating from an ancient well, reverberant with jazz ghosts and warmed by the heat of soul and pop, Batsumi is nothing short of revelatory.Many groups from this period did not issue recordings at all, and Batsumi are unusual in even having left an official recorded legacy. Out of print since the 1970s, and never issued outside of South African in its entireity, Batsumi is a landmark South African jazz recording, and a key musical document of its time.
Ndikho Xaba And The Natives - Ndikho Xaba And The Natives
Ndikho Xaba And The Natives
Ndikho Xaba And The Natives
LP | 1970 | UK | Reissue (Matsuli)
36,99 €*
Release:1970 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Ndikho Xaba was born in 1934 in Pietermaritzburg, KZN, South Africa. For thirty-four years — 1964 –1998 — he lived in exile in the US, Canada and Tanzania. Originally issued by Trilyte Records out of Oakland, California, this 1970 recording is bracing, freewheeling Now Thing, suffused with SA idioms, and focussed by a political urgency wiring together US Black Power, Black Aesthetics and the anti-apartheid front-line like nothing else. You can hear Trane from the off — ‘a spiritual offering to my ancestors’ — and plenty of Sun Ra, with whom The Natives several times shared double-bills. (Xaba was to become close with Phil Cohran and the AACM.) Freedom is a gutbucket-soul rendition of the people’s anthem; Nomusa is dedicated to Xaba’s new wife, a poet and CORE activist from Chicago. The thunderous finale Makhosi features drummer Keita from the West Indies, and Baba Duru, who studied percussion in India, before winding up with Xaba blowing eerily through a horn made from a giant piece of tubular seaweed. Hats off to Matsuli for this outstanding reissue.
Back To Top
Show Filter & CategoriesFilter Results
Tracklist
Tracklist
Close Player