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Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab Vinyl, CD & Tape 17 Items

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Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah Um Mobile Fidelity Ultradisc One-Step Edition
Bob Dylan - Love And Theft
Bob Dylan
Love And Theft
LP | 2020 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
74,99 €*
Release:2020 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
Preorder available from 18.12.2020
Mastered From THE Original Master Tapes AND Pressed AT RTI ON Dead Quiet Vinyl AND Strictly Limited TO Only 3000 Numbered Copies. Love & Theft IS Like A Visionary Train Ride Through THE Vast American Landscape AND ALL ITS Hills AND Valleys AND Urban AND Rural Settlements. NOW IT Also HAS Knock-out Sound Qaulity!
T.Rex - Electric Warrior
T.Rex
Electric Warrior
2LP | 1971 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
74,99 €*
Release:1971 / US – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
T. Rex's Exotic Landmark Signals the Birth of Glam Rock, Features "Bang a Gong (Get It On)": Electric Warrior Swaggers with Libido, Flamboyance, Fantasy, Fun, Hooks, and Theatricality

Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's State-of-the-Art Mastering System: 180g 45RPM Vinyl 2LP Set Presents the 1971 Record's Reverb, Colors, Tones, and String Arrangements in Full-Tilt Glory

Bang a gong and get it on. At once sardonic, flamboyant, and trashy, T. Rex's uncommonly unique Electric Warrior catapulted leader Marc Bolan to stardom, triggered an ongoing fascination with glam rock, and launched a movement that soon involved David Bowie, Roxy Music, Mott the Hoople, and more. Yet none of those namesake artists ever released a record that out-glammed, out-innuendoed, out-thrusted, or out-camped Electric Warrior – named the 160th Greatest Album of All Time by Rolling Stone and included in the celebrated book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's state-of-the-art mastering system, pressed on dead-quiet vinyl at RTI, and housed in a gatefold sleeve, the label's numbered-edition 180g 45RPM 2LP set gives the 1971 landmark the widescreen sound quality it has always deserved. Tony Visconti's warm, reverb-soaked production and Roy Thomas Baker's ace engineering remain two of the work's most famous and revered elements. Here, the production and music can be experienced in all its full-tilt glory, from the subtle albeit elegant classical touches to the instantly identifiable Les Paul guitar licks to Bolan's sensual, wispy, are-they-or-aren't-they-serious vocals.

As Sean Egan wrote in the liner notes of a long-out-of-print reissue: "The sound is recognizably rock, yet a previously unheard exotic variant, almost as if concocted by inhabitants of one of the Tolkien-esque worlds common in Bolan's lyrics. The strings are overt but discreet in shape and tone, injecting just the right amount of class." All these aspects and more come to life with a realism, vibrancy, detail, and textural palpability that surpass the presentation on any prior analog edition. If you can hear colors, this audiophile version of Electric Warrior will stimulate your inner synesthesia.

At the time of the album's creation, such cosmic-related phenomenon were well within Bolan's orbit. But the differences between Electric Warrior and the singer/guitarist's earlier works are as vast as those that divide high art and low-brow culture. Chief among them: Bolan's decision to channel his acoustic hippie-inspired visions into hyper-sexualized, metaphor-rich statements that benefit from amplified foundations. And still, part of the songs' charm relates to how they tread a fine line between rock and pop.

Save for the lashing out of "Rip Off," Electric Warrior retains a mellow core underlined by a gauzy tint, gossamer temperament, and crushed-velvet feel. The perception that he record contains blustery heaviness is furthered – and initiated – by the now-iconic album cover, which depicts a giant-sized Bolan standing in front of an equally giant amplifier stack, striking a rock-star pose and giving the impression everything within is designed to go to the proverbial 11 on the volume knob. Akin to a majority of the songs themselves, the visual functions as clever illusion, absurd humor, ostentatious simplicity, and playful pretense.

Bursting with excessive fun and unchecked libido, T. Rex's catchy boogies, shuffles, and vamps scoot by on a seemingly impossible blend of concise hooks, non-sequitur fantasies, and theatrical swagger. From the chart-topping "Bang a Gong (Get It On)" to the beautiful "Life's a Gas," the R&B-stoked hit "Jeepster" to the pout of "Motivator" and galactic soul of "Planet Queen," Bolan, percussionist Mickey Finn, and boards manipulator Visconti craft a rewardingly strange, parallel universe of sound, style, and sex that still has no equal.
Train - Drops Of Jupiter
Train
Drops Of Jupiter
LP | 2020 | US | Original (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
57,99 €*
Release:2020 / US – Original
Genre:Rock / Indie
There’s nothing wrong with echoing classic rock and harmonic pop sounds, especially when it’s done this well. Drops of Jupiter, Train’s two-time Grammy-winning 2001 album, revels in sweeping hooks and soulful comfort borrowed from proven 70s methods. At its core, the San Francisco quintet’s sophomore record is the result of what happens when concerns about trends and coolness are put aside and solid, genuinely earnest music is made the primary focus.



Drawing from influences such as Elton John and Van Morrison, Train crafts eminently listenable fare steeped in finely tailored melodies and bolstered by affirmative messages. Complementary accents in the form of sing-along refrains, folksy mandolins, and scene-setting synthesizer fills give songs grounding and fully realized depth. Time and again, the band’s acoustic-based material satisfies and inspires—particularly now that it’s finally available in analogue.



Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, Mobile Fidelity’s 180g vinyl LP brings listeners much closer to the group’s roots-rock instrumentation and vocalist Pat Monahan’s smooth tonalities. Free of the harshness, boxiness, and flatness discernible on the CD, it breathes with an openness and airiness that grants the music translucent qualities. Previously restricted, dynamic headroom and instrumental separation are enlarged and enhanced. Suffice it to say that this modern classic has never sounded anywhere this good. It’s a record made for experiencing on vinyl, and one timeless in construction and mood.
Yazoo - Upstairs at Eric's Numbered Limited Edition
Yazoo
Upstairs at Eric's Numbered Limited Edition
LP | 1982 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
32,99 €*
Release:1982 / US – Reissue
Genre:Pop
All the Grooves Hit the Low-Frequency Targets: LP Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's World-Renowned Mastering System and Pressed at RTI!
Run DMC - Raising Hell Limited Numbered Mobile Fidelity Edition
Run DMC
Raising Hell Limited Numbered Mobile Fidelity Edition
2LP | 1986 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
86,99 €*
Release:1986 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Preorder available from 27.11.2020
Among the Most Influential, Inventive, Invigorating Records Ever Released: Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell Brought Hip-Hop to the Mainstream, Includes Crossover Smash "Walk This Way"

Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Strictly Limited to 3,000 Numbered Copies: Mobile Fidelity 180g 45rpm 2LP Heightens Rick Rubin's Pioneering Production

Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell remains the turning point at which hip-hop crashed through mainstream barriers and never left. Anchored by the crossover smash "Walk This Way," the 1986 blockbuster still sounds like a revolution unfolding in real time. It has everything – hard-rock riffs, turntable scratching, itchy rhythms, hit singles – not the least of which are the trio's invigorating raps and inseparable chemistry. And now it's the first rap record afforded audiophile treatment, courtesy of Mobile Fidelity's simply illin' analog edition.

Mastered from the original master tapes, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 copies and 2000 Sacd, the unsurpassed reissue label's 180g 45rpm 2LP set elevates Raising Hell to sonic heights on par with its musical and cultural significance. Ranked the 123rd Greatest Album of All Time by Rolling Stone, 43rd on Pitchfork's Greatest Albums of the 1980s, one of the Top 100 Albums of All Time by Time – and included on "Best of" lists by Spin, Paste, XXL, Entertainment Weekly, and basically every other significant media outlet – the triple-platinum effort rocks the house.

Afforded extra groove space, Raising Hell unleashes a torrent of massive dynamics and tsunami of frequency-plumbing details underlined by Rick Rubin's taut, crisp, albeit raw and streetwise production. Just as the Queens-based group both defined what hip-hop could represent – and displayed just how big it could get – Rubin's work melded ear-worm hooks, savvy drum loops, metal-leaning guitars, and, of course, Run and D.M.C.'s cross-fire lyrical interplay into watertight frameworks bursting with ideas, tones, samples, and beats. Heard anew on Mobile Fidelity vinyl, Raising Hell is in every regard the aural equivalent of a direct-to-console 1970s classic. And it sounds as fresh as hell.

As for the music, it ranks among the most influential, inventive, and invigorating ever released – rap or otherwise. Vanguard artists such as Ice-T, Eminem, Jay-Z, and Public Enemy's Chuck D – who declared it his all-time favorite and "the first record that made me realize this was an album-oriented genre" – have testified on behalf of its brilliance. And never mind the presence of the Top 5 single "Walk This Way," whose power helped make Aerosmith's Steven Tyler and Joe Perry relevant for the first time in nearly a decade – and literally put Run-D.M.C. in bedrooms ranging from the Bronx to Bartlett to Bad Axe.

Look instead to the rest of the entirely filler-free set, be it the corkscrew turns, slippery wordplay, and "My Sharona"-meets-"Mickey" mixology of the boisterous "It's Tricky," the fat-but-minimized bass grooves and warped turntable wobble of the hysterical "You Be Illin'," chimes-accented inertia and boombox-on-shoulder thunder of the now-iconic "Peter Piper," or voice-as-percussion attack of the funky "Is It Live." With Raising Hell, the answer to the question is always affirmative – a sensation bolstered by the fact the group always had something to say.

The definition of Golden Age Hip-Hop in every way, Run-D.M.C. avoids the negativity and misogyny that later plagued the style, spinning assertive tales about identity (the biographical and culture-changing "My Adidas"), work ethics ("Perfection"), and, most notably, pride (the Harriet Tubman- and Malcom X.-referencing "Proud to Be Black"). Pavement-packed inner cities, tree-lined suburbs, and cornfield-rimmed rural areas would never again be the same. And rocking a rhyme that's right on time would become trickier than ever.
Vanilla Fudge - Vanilla Fudge
Thelonious Monk Quartet, The - Monk's Dream One-Step Mofi Supervinyl Pressing
Thelonious Monk Quartet, The
Monk's Dream One-Step Mofi Supervinyl Pressing
2LP | 1963 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
187,99 €*
Release:1963 / US – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The Definitive Version of Thelonious Monk's Best-Ever-Selling Album: Keepsake Edition Strictly Limited to 6,000 Numbered Copies. One copy per customer.

The historical import, musical genius, and timeless artistry of Monk's Dream can be best appreciated by first placing the record in the context of its era. In short, Thelonious Monk's joyful Columbia Records debut triggered a domino effect of mainstream attention, best-selling success, and unstinting respect that led him to become one of only six jazz musicians to ever grace the cover of Time – then America's most widely read weekly magazine. Couple the extraordinary feat with the fact the British Invasion and Beatlemania were already un full swing, and the cultural significance – not to mention its place in the jazz canon – of Monk's Dream skyrockets to near-unthinkable heights.

Strictly limited to 6,000 numbered copies, pressed on MoFi SuperVinyl at RTI, and mastered from the original master tapes, Mobile Fidelity's ultra-hi-fi UltraDisc One-Step 180g 45RPM 2LP collector's edition pays tribute to the 1963 album's merit and enhances the music for generations to come. Surpassing the sonics of every other prior version, this spectacular collector's edition strips away any remaining film and limiting ceilings to provide a clear, transparent, and up-close view of a set that inspired DownBeat to award the record a five-star review in which critic Pete Welding correctly proclaimed it "a stunning reaffirmation of [Monk's] powers as a performer and composer."
Bread - Baby I'm-A Want You
Bread
Baby I'm-A Want You
LP | 1972 | EU | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
51,99 €*
Release:1972 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Pop
LIMITED TO 3000 COPIES. POP-ROCK CLASSIC EPITOMISING THE TIMELESS EARLY '70S AM RADIO SOUNDS, INCLUDING FOUR TOP 40 HITS!
Dire Straits - Making Movies
Bob Dylan - John Wesley Harding
Ray Charles - The Genius Sings the Blues
Run DMC - Raising Hell Limited Numbered Hybrid Sacd Stereo Mobile Fidelity Edition
Run DMC
Raising Hell Limited Numbered Hybrid Sacd Stereo Mobile Fidelity Edition
CD | 1986 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
44,99 €*
Release:1986 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Among the Most Influential, Inventive, Invigorating Records Ever Released: Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell Brought Hip-Hop to the Mainstream, Includes Crossover Smash "Walk This Way"

Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Strictly Limited to 2,000 Numbered Copies: Mobile Fidelity Hybrid Sacd Dramatically Heightens Rick Rubin's Pioneering Production Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell remains the turning point at which hip-hop crashed through mainstream barriers and never left. Anchored by the crossover smash "Walk This Way," the 1986 blockbuster still sounds like a revolution unfolding in real time. It has everything – hard-rock riffs, turntable scratching, itchy rhythms, hit singles – not the least of which are the trio's invigorating raps and inseparable chemistry. And now it's the first rap record afforded audiophile treatment, courtesy of Mobile Fidelity's simply illin' analog edition.

Mastered from the original master tapes, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 copies and 2000 Sacd, the unsurpassed reissue label's 180g 45rpm 2LP set elevates Raising Hell to sonic heights on par with its musical and cultural significance. Ranked the 123rd Greatest Album of All Time by Rolling Stone, 43rd on Pitchfork's Greatest Albums of the 1980s, one of the Top 100 Albums of All Time by Time – and included on "Best of" lists by Spin, Paste, XXL, Entertainment Weekly, and basically every other significant media outlet – the triple-platinum effort rocks the house.



Afforded extra groove space, Raising Hell unleashes a torrent of massive dynamics and tsunami of frequency-plumbing details underlined by Rick Rubin's taut, crisp, albeit raw and streetwise production. Just as the Queens-based group both defined what hip-hop could represent – and displayed just how big it could get – Rubin's work melded ear-worm hooks, savvy drum loops, metal-leaning guitars, and, of course, Run and D.M.C.'s cross-fire lyrical interplay into watertight frameworks bursting with ideas, tones, samples, and beats. Heard anew on Mobile Fidelity vinyl, Raising Hell is in every regard the aural equivalent of a direct-to-console 1970s classic. And it sounds as fresh as hell.



As for the music, it ranks among the most influential, inventive, and invigorating ever released – rap or otherwise. Vanguard artists such as Ice-T, Eminem, Jay-Z, and Public Enemy's Chuck D – who declared it his all-time favorite and "the first record that made me realize this was an album-oriented genre" – have testified on behalf of its brilliance. And never mind the presence of the Top 5 single "Walk This Way," whose power helped make Aerosmith's Steven Tyler and Joe Perry relevant for the first time in nearly a decade – and literally put Run-D.M.C. in bedrooms ranging from the Bronx to Bartlett to Bad Axe.



Look instead to the rest of the entirely filler-free set, be it the corkscrew turns, slippery wordplay, and "My Sharona"-meets-"Mickey" mixology of the boisterous "It's Tricky," the fat-but-minimized bass grooves and warped turntable wobble of the hysterical "You Be Illin'," chimes-accented inertia and boombox-on-shoulder thunder of the now-iconic "Peter Piper," or voice-as-percussion attack of the funky "Is It Live." With Raising Hell, the answer to the question is always affirmative – a sensation bolstered by the fact the group always had something to say.

The definition of Golden Age Hip-Hop in every way, Run-D.M.C. avoids the negativity and misogyny that later plagued the style, spinning assertive tales about identity (the biographical and culture-changing "My Adidas"), work ethics ("Perfection"), and, most notably, pride (the Harriet Tubman- and Malcom X.-referencing "Proud to Be Black"). Pavement-packed inner cities, tree-lined suburbs, and cornfield-rimmed rural areas would never again be the same. And rocking a rhyme that's right on time would become trickier than ever.
Johnny Cash - I Walk The Line Numbered Limited Edition
Johnny Cash
I Walk The Line Numbered Limited Edition
2LP | 1964 | UK | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
85,99 €*
Release:1964 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
Originally released in 1964 on Columbia, produced by fellow Country Music Hall of Fame inductee Don Law, and featuring note-for-note re-recordings of several staples Johnny Cash made for Sun Records – including the title track, "Hey Porter," and "Big River" – as well as several new originals, I Walk the Line cemented the singer's place as the leading country artist of the era. Indeed, as the original liner notes state, "I Walk the Line offers Johnny Cash, renowned storyteller-in-song, at his creative and performing best."

Now, for the first time in more than five decades, you can experience it in true-to-the-source mono courtesy of Mobile Fidelity's meticulously restored reissue. Mastered from the original mono master tapes, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 numbered copies, the audiophile label's 180g 45rpm 2LP set broadcasts the inimitable sonics of the Man in Black's cut-from-bedrock baritone, earnest acoustic strumming, and hand-in-glove band with utmost clarity, directness, and realism.

Much has been rightly made about the sparse, deceivingly simple boom-chicka-boom sound of Cash's righthand men, otherwise known as the Tennessee Three: bassist Marshall Grant, guitarist Luther Perkins, and drummer W.S. "Fluke" Holland. On this collectible edition of I Walk the Line, the trio's steady, fundamental rhythms and fresh, driving beats resonate with a presence, solidity, and immediacy unavailable on any other Cash recording. Such are the advantages associated with going back to mono, which gets right to the core of the rough-and-tumble country tenor of songs such as "Folsom Prison Blues" and "I Walk the Line."

There's a profound release of more textures, embedded details, and lively cohesiveness, with the group enmeshed with rather than separated from Cash's vocals. Key instrumental and vocal contributions from the likes of the Carter Family, steel guitarist Don Helms, pianist Floyd Cramer, and trumpeters Bill McElhiney and Karl Garvin (the same duo who played the signature Mexican-inspired brass refrain on "Ring of Fire") also come to the fore, no longer buried or artificially panned in the false stereo mix. Mobile Fidelity's I Walk the Line epitomizes the classic Cash sound and approach, through and through.

As for the music, it remains infallible. While the Sun material may be redone, the inspired performances equal those of the originals and, in some cases, like the fresh arrangement of "Wreck of the Old 97," improve upon them. And that says nothing of the new songs, most notably, the now-legendary "Understand Your Man," a humorous takedown that thematically and melodically references soon-to-be Cash collaborator Bob Dylan and his "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright." The tune hit Number One on the Billboard Country charts and stayed there for six weeks.

Coupled with other new fare (e.g., the sly "Bad News" and gospel-bent closer "Troublesome Waters) and his ensemble's chemistry and in-the-moment enthusiasm, a byproduct of the momentum that witnessed the singer/guitarist and company attain crossover fame, and the reprised music helps make I Walk the Line a benchmark Columbia set – and a Cash milestone.
Twisted Sister - Stay Hungry Numbered Limited Edition
Twisted Sister
Stay Hungry Numbered Limited Edition
LP | 1984 | UK | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
51,99 €*
Release:1984 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Rock / Indie
Expected in spring an iconic album of the 80s, balancing fun and rebellion. includes we're not gonna take it "undeniably" their most (in)famous song. mastered from the original tapes. limited to 3000.
Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home
Weezer - Pinkerton Numbered Limited Edition
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