5 € VOUCHERJOIN OUR MAILING LIST
GenresNew In StockBack In StockPreorderHHV ExclusivesHHV Top 100ChartsSale
false

Nu Disco | Disco Edits | Cosmic CD 6 Items

Show Filter & CategoriesFilter Results
Sorting: Popular
96 Items/Page
V.A. - Heisei No Oto - Japanese Left-Field Pop From The CD Age (1989-1996)
V.A.
Heisei No Oto - Japanese Left-Field Pop From The CD Age (1989-1996)
2CD | 2021 | EU | Original (Music From Memory)
20,99 €*
Release:2021 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
Music From Memory is excited to announce a special compilation that they’ve been working on for some time now; Mfm053 – VA – Heisei No Oto – Japanese Left-field Pop From The CD Age (1989-1996). Compiled by long-time friends of the label, Eiji Taniguchi and Norio Sato, Heisei No Oto delves into a world of music released almost exclusively on CD and brings together a fascinating selection of discoveries from a little known and overlooked part of Japan’s musical history. The last ten or so years have seen a global wave of interest in Japanese music encompassing ambient, jazz, new wave and pop records from the 1980s, some of which is increasingly considered the most innovative and visionary music of that time. Although some music from this period, in the form of ‘City Pop’ or ‘rare groove’ records, had been coveted by collectors and DJs for a number of years, most Japanese music from the time was little known outside and often even within Japan. Sometime around the mid 2000s, two Osaka record store owners, Eiji Taniguchi of Revelation Time and Norio Sato of Rare Groove, along with a handful of deep Japanese diggers such as Chee Shimizu of Organic Music records in Tokyo, began to explore beyond the typical ‘grooves’ or ‘breaks’. Much like their counterparts in Europe and the US, they began delving into home-grown ambient, jazz, new wave and pop records, discovering visionary music, often driven by synthesizers or drum computers, that broke beyond the typical confines of their genres. Spending tireless hours in local record stores and embarking on digging trips across the country, Eiji Taniguchi and Norio Sato, much like Chee Shimizu, have been at the forefront of unearthing and introducing many of the very Japanese records now loved and sought after around the world. Yet as YouTube algorithms and vinyl reissues would transport such music into the global consciousness and demand and therefore scarcity intensified for such records, so Eiji and Norio have recently begun to turn their attention to CDs. The title of the compilation Heisei No Oto refers to the sound of the Heisei era, which began in 1989 and corresponds to the reign of Emperor Akihito until his abdication in 2019. Marking the culmination of one of the most rapid economic growths in Japanese history, 1989 also coincided with the music industry’s final shift away from vinyl in favour of CDs. And, although compact discs were first introduced seven years earlier it wasn’t until late into the ‘80s that, beyond dance music labels, CDs became the exclusive format for major and independent labels in Japan and throughout the world. This however didn’t signal the end of the innovation in Japan. Many of those same musicians who have become known for their work in the ‘80s would continue to produce outstanding music well into the mid ‘90s, as greater innovation and advances in musical equipment allowed Japanese musicians and producers to refine and explore new sounds. While musicians such as the seminal Haruomi Hosono, whose productions feature on a number of tracks, would continue to push the boundaries of these new technologies, these technological advances also meant less established musicians were able to make use of increasingly affordable but state-of-the-art equipment. Including music by Haruomi Hosono as well as Yasuaki Shimizu, Toshifumi Hinata and Ichiko Hashimoto who have become known and loved around the world in recent years, Hesei No Oto also features Japanese pop star Yosui Inoue, producers Jun Sato and Keisuke Kikuchi in aaddition to less established artists from the contemporary, jazz, new wave, pop and dance music scenes. Bringing together a selection of tracks that seem to define these specific genres and in fact move fluidly between a number of them, the music on the compilation is again underscored by experimentations with synthesizers and drum computers though with something of a gentle Pop sensibility. Reimagined here then under the encompassing term ‘Left-field Pop’, this is an exciting chapter in Japanese musical history that has only just begun to be fully explored. VA - Heisei No Oto - Japanese Left-field Pop From The CD Age (1989-1996) is a 2xLP/2xCD that includes liner notes by Chee Shimizu and artwork by Hagihara Takuya and is released on February 28th.
Todd Terje - It´s Album Time
Todd Terje
It´s Album Time
CD | 2014 | UK | Original (Olsen)
16,99 €*
Release:2014 / UK – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
The wait is finally over: It's Album Time. Although pretty self-obvious, it has to be stressed that Todd Terje eventually did what every self-respecting, self-loving and ambitious artist has to do over the course of his or her career: to put all your eggs in one basket. And what a basket full of joy it is!
Arp Frique - The Seed
Arp Frique
The Seed
CD | 2021 | EU | Original (Colorful World)
14,99 €*
Release:2021 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
Preorder available from 01.10.2021
“A seed is the basis of life: a tree, food, a baby, conception, a thought, an album, a band,” says Arp Frique around the title and narrative theme of his latest album. “A seed is growth from almost nothing to everything.”

It’s also linked to a track by Stevie Wonder that he often covers with the band live - 'A Seed's a Star/Tree Medley.' Arp Frique has an inherent understanding of funk and a flush-tight connection to the groove. This was apparent on his debut Welcome To The Colorful World of Arp Frique, via its fusion of disco and funk interwoven with Caribbean and Cape Verdean sounds, and it continues even more so here. If anything, the album plunges deeper into Arp Frique’s love of rhythm and groove. “I went deeper into my love for synths and drum machines from a dance floor perspective,” he says of the album. “This one has more of an electronic vibe.”

The result is an album that feels potently alive, sonically exploring the globe via a concoction of sounds that takes in disco, synth boogie, funk and the sounds of the Caribbean, West and East Africa. The album radiates the feeling of a lost gem, the kind that a crate digging aficionado may find in some far flung place that ends up with a re-release. Whilst Arp Frique expresses a real fondness for such classic sounds - “honestly I wouldn’t even know how to make modern stuff, I am stuck in the 70-80-90s and I love it there” - a tired exercise in retro nostalgia this isn’t. Instead, the album feels more like a fresh take on sounds that once ignited dance floors across the world.

On top of having the dance floor in mind, the album is also a deeply personal one. “I wanted to make this one even more personal and have the lyrics go deeper,” he says. “The lyrics on the album reflect the times we live in: the confusion, hope, despair, rebellion, unity, upgrading consciousness and divinity.” The creative process - despite benefiting hugely from guests that include Americo Brito, Mariseya, Orlando Julius and The Scorpios - is also a personal and intense one for Arp Frique. “I always think in terms of sound and emotion, the two most important aspects of music,” he says. “Every layer that I add needs to add emotion and amplify the sonic palette. It’s a very deep process that I need to do on my own - there is no other way for me. I connect to a higher level of consciousness during these sessions and all external influences need to be cut off in order for this to have maximum effect.”

The theme of the seed that runs through this album, and the connotations of a life cycle, is linked to parenthood. “My daughter, now 5 years old, is my everything and the main drive for everything I do,” he says. “I dedicated this album to her and because this album means so much to me and reflects so much, I also have a full movie almost ready to be released together with the album.” Much like the album itself, the accompanying video will touch upon the tones and styles of bygone decades. “It’s a mixture of a road movie of me and the live band, mixed with a semi-fictional autobiographical story with the album as a soundtrack, all in VHS. Think Holy Mountain meets Sun Ra movies meets Purple Rain but on a low budget with a VHS-cult vibe to it.”
V.A. - Midnight In Tokyo Volume 3
V.A.
Midnight In Tokyo Volume 3
CD | 2019 | EU | Original (Studio Mule)
13,99 €*
Release:2019 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
Midnight In Tokyo is a compilation series that aims to be the perfect companion to nights in Tokyo, collecting tracks by japanese artists that sound best at night. While vol.2 focused more on ’80s jazz fusion, the latest installment, vol.3, picks up where vol.1 left off, bringing together forgotten soul, disco, and new wave gems. The compilation opens with japanese rare groove classic “more sexy,” a provocative song by “the queen of sexy songs,” Yoko Hatanaka. “kimi no yume,” from the album yume no yonbai by the wandering poet Masumi Hara, is one of the best balearic acid folk song to come out of japan.
Bison (Holger Czukay of Can & Smith & Mudd) - Travellers
Bison (Holger Czukay of Can & Smith & Mudd)
Travellers
CD | 2014 | EU | Original (Claremont 56)
15,99 €*
Release:2014 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
It’s some four years since the release of Bison’s acclaimed debut single, "Way To L.A", the result of a series of productive studio sessions between Paul "Mudd" Murphy, longtime collaborator Ben Smith, krautrock legend Holgar Czukay and vocalist Ursula Major. Since then, Murphy and Smith have made a number of return trips to CAN's Innerspace Studio in Cologne, where Czukay famously conjures his out-there musical magic. The result is Travellers, the quartet's long-promised debut album. It is, by anyone's standards, a deliciously dubby and intergalactic concoction; a fearlessly atmospheric blend of krautrock and dub disco-inspired grooves, delay-laden horns, quirky percussion, stargazing electronics and eyes-wide-shut vocals. The dub influence is particularly notable given Bison's love of "versioning" tracks. Three of the tracks – "Way To L.A", "New Moon Boy", and "Familiar Stranger" (the latter two mixed by Conrad Idjut, who also turns the album's title track into a clandestine, French-horn-laden late night masterpiece) – appear in "Day" and "Night" versions. Meanwhile, previous single "Mandy" – a murky spaced-out stroll though the collective Bison hivemind – is also included in two forms, with the Balearic stoner rock of the "Power Boy Mix" offering a sun-kissed (but still deliciously atmospheric) reinterpretation. Highlights are naturally plentiful, with Ursula Major's half-spoken, half-whispered vocals wrapping themselves around spacious rhythms, shuffling drums, twinkling, effects-laden guitars and low-slung basslines. Travellers is an album rich on otherworldly intent, sparse grooves and thick, enveloping production. It's exactly the sort of album you'd expect from musicians and producers of this calibre. We may have been waiting a while, but Bison have definitely delivered.
Mudd & Pollard - Mawson’s Walk
Mudd & Pollard
Mawson’s Walk
12" | 2013 | EU | Original (Claremont 56)
9,99 €*
Release:2013 / EU – Original
Genre:Electronic / Dance
Claremont 56 kick the year off in fine style with ‘Mawson’s walk’,
a beautiful one-sider from Mudd & Pollard.
Back To Top
Tracklist
Tracklist
Close Player