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Ostinato Vinyl, CD & Tape 8 Items

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Star Band De Dakar - Psicodelia Afro-Cubana De Senegal
Star Band De Dakar
Psicodelia Afro-Cubana De Senegal
LP | 2019 | EU | Original (Ostinato)
27,99 €*
Release:2019 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
2019 marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution, when the Cuban way won hearts, minds, and ears across Africa. This album is the soundtrack to a time when Cuban music was the future for 1970s Senegal.Changüí, Guajira, Salsa, and Son mingle with cosmic Mbalax guitars, Sabar rhythms, Afro-Latin horns, and Spanish vocals spiced with a Senegalese twang. The finest gumbo of Cuban and Senegalese sounds.With just two microphones and a four-track Revox tape recorder, Star Band recorded their entire catalog in Dakar's iconic Miami nightclub. Each album contained one stand-out Afro-Cuban tune. Six of Star Band's most psychedelic Afro-Cuban tracks, an ode to their finest hour, are selected here.
V.A. - Two Niles to Sing a Melody
V.A.
Two Niles to Sing a Melody
3LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Ostinato)
35,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Ostinato presents "Two Niles to Sing a Melody: The Violins & Synths of Sudan", a superb Afro compilation released on 3xLP Gatefold with 20-page booklet & 2xCD Bookcase with 32-page booklet ... In Sudan, the political and cultural are inseparable.In 1989, a coup brought a hardline religious government to power. Music was violently condemned. Many musicians and artists were persecuted, tortured, forced to flee into exile — and even murdered, ending one of the most beloved music eras in all of Africa and largely denying Sudan's gifted instrumentalists, singers, and poets, from strutting their creative heritage on the global stage.What came before in a special era that protected and promoted the arts was one of the richest music scenes anywhere in the world. Although Sudanese styles are endlessly diverse, this compilation celebrates the golden sound of the capital, Khartoum. Each chapter of the cosmopolitan city's tumultuous musical story is covered through 16 tracks: from the hypnotic violin and accordion-driven orchestral music of the 1970s that captured the ears and hearts of Africa and the Arabic-speaking world, to the synthesizer and drum machine music of the 1980s, and the music produced in exile in the 1990s. The deep kicks of tum tum and Nubian rhythms keep the sound infectious.Sudan of old had music everywhere: roving sound systems and ubiquitous bands and orchestras kept Khartoum's sharply dressed youth on their feet. Live music was integral to cultural life, producing a catalog of concert recordings. In small arenas and large outdoor venues, musical royalty of the day built Khartoum's reputation as ground zero for innovation and technique that inspired a continent.Musicians in Ethiopia and Somalia frequently point to Sudan's biggest golden era stars as idols. Mention Mohammed Wardi — a legendary Sudanese singer and activist akin to Fela Kuti in stature and impact in his music and politics — and they often look to the heavens. A popular story is of one man from Mali who walked for three months across the Sahel to Sudan because the father of the woman he wanted to marry would only allow it if he got him a signed cassette from Wardi himself. Saied Khalifa is said to be the one of the few singers to make Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie smile.Such is the stature of Sudanese singers and the reputation of Sudanese music, particularly in the "Sudanic Belt," a cultural zone that stretches from Djibouti all the way west to Mauritania, covering much of the Sahara and the Sahel, lands where Sudanese artists are household names and Sudanese poems are regularly used as lyrics until today to produce the latest hits. Sudanese cassettes often sold more in Cameroon and Nigeria than at home.But years of anti-music sentiment have made recordings in Sudan difficult to source. Ostinato's team traveled to Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti, and Egypt in search of the timeless cultural artifacts that hold the story of one of Africa's most mesmerizing cultures. That these cassette tape and vinyl recordings were mainly found in Sudan's neighbors is a testament to Sudanese music's widespread appeal.With our Sudanese partner and co-compiler Tamador Sheikh Eldin Gibreel, a once famous poet and actress in '70s Khartoum, Ostinato's fifth album, following our Grammy-nominated "Sweet As Broken Dates," revives the enchanting harmonies, haunting melodies, and relentless rhythms of Sudan's brightest years, fully restored, remastered and packaged luxuriously in a triple LP gatefold and double CD bookcase to match the regal repute of Sudanese music. A 20,000-word liner note booklet gives voice to the singers silenced by an oppressive regime.Take a sail down the Blue and White Nile as they pass through Khartoum, carrying with them an ancient history and a never-ending stream of poems and songs. It takes two Niles to sing a melody.
V.A. - Sweet As Broken Dates: Lost Somali Tapes
V.A.
Sweet As Broken Dates: Lost Somali Tapes
2LP | 2017 | US | Original (Ostinato)
29,99 €*
Release:2017 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
In 1988, on the eve of a two decade civil war, Somalia's authoritarian ruler Siad Barre launched punishing air strikes on the north of the country, known today as Somaliland, in response to agitations for independence. The bombing leveled the entire city. Barre targeted Radio Hargeisa to prevent any kind of central communication system that could organize a resistance. With the attack imminent, a few brave radio operators and dedicated vanguards of Somali culture knew the archives, containing over half a century of Somali music had to be preserved. Thousands upon thousands of cassette tapes and master reels were quickly removed from the soon-to-be targeted buildings. They were dispersed to neighboring countries like Djibouti and Ethiopia, and buried deep under the ground to withstand even the most powerful airstrikes."We buried them in the ground so the bomb's won't hit," one former leading journalist with Radio Hargeisa told us.These audio artifacts were excavated and recalled from their foreign shelters only very recently. Some of those recordings are now kept safe in the 10,000-strong cassette tape archive of the Red Sea Foundation, the largest collection of Somali cassettes in the world, in Somaliland's capital, Hargeisa. The Ostinato Records team digitized a large portion of the archive, distilling 15 songs that reveal the panoramic diversity of styles and sophistication of Somali musicianship.Over a millennia of trade in the Indian Ocean invited the cultures of the Arabian Peninsula, Persia, India, Southeast Asia, and even China to slowly work their melodies, scales, and sounds into Somalia's rich musical repertoire. Each track is a keen illustration of a carefully refined, rarely revealed cultural crossroads of the world.The archive offered a living window to the Mogadishu of the 1970s and 1980s, when the coastal capital glistened as the "Pearl of the Indian Ocean," when wine flowed freely. With its iconic ivory-colored architecture and crescent beaches overlooking the Indian Ocean, Mogadishu was home to the lavish Al Uruba and Jazira sea side hotels, where youthful bands like Iftiin, Sharero, and Dur Dur serenaded cosmopolitan crowds at some of the most elegant nightclubs in East Africa. These damaged cassettes evoked memories of the revered national theater, where Waaberi Band provided unforgettable soundtracks. Mogadishu's nightlife culture was rich and booming. Raucous rhythms, rugged horns, celestial synthesizers, and stalking baselines came alive alongside majestic voices like Mahmud "Jerry" Hussen and powerful and adored female singers like Faadumo Qaasim, Hibo Nuura, and Sahra Dawo. Somali music of this era is set apart by its empowerment of women. Female singers, often more prolific than their male counterparts, are inseparable from its evolution. Half the compilation is sung by women, their voices often compared in Somali poetry to the sweetness of broken dates. Poetry, intrinsic to the cultural fabric, forms the foundation of Somali songwriting.Somali music's golden age, curiously, occurred under a socialist military dictatorship, which effectively nationalized the music industry. A thriving scene was owned entirely by the state. Music was recorded for and by national radio stations and only disseminated through public broadcasts or live performances. Private labels were virtually non-existent. This music was never made available for mass release. Almost all recorded material came from original masters or homemade recordings of radio broadcasts. As a result, most of it has never been heard outside Somalia and the immediate region.During the Cold War, Somalia drifted between Soviet and American support — and a decade of U.S. backing allowed soul and funk to capture the imagination of Somali youth, adding the final touch on this masterpiece era.This project took our team to Mogadishu, Hargeisa, Djibouti, and across the Somali diaspora in Europe, the United States, and the Middle East. For the last year, from Minnesota to Mogadishu to Malaysia, we have tracked down the musicians, songwriters, composers, former government officials, and quirky personalities that colored Somali music life. Their words and stories are revealed in a 15,000-word liner note booklet — the only document of its kind to cover this era of Somali music in depth.Alongside the story of Somalia's music before the civil war, the selection is also focused on the pan-Somali sound. Spread over much of the Horn of Africa, Somali language and culture transcend arbitrary borders. Somali singers from Djibouti were at home in Mogadishu. This compilation seeks to revive the rightful image, history, and identity of the Somali people, detached from war, violence, piracy, and the specter of a persistent threat. These 15 tracks should serve as a necessary starting point.
Conjunto Jovens Africanos - Nhu Djon / Volta Pa Terra
Conjunto Jovens Africanos
Nhu Djon / Volta Pa Terra
7" | 2018 | US | Original (Ostinato)
12,99 €*
Release:2018 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Continuing Ostinato's series of Cape Verde 45s showcasing diasporan bands that are staples in Europe's Cape Verdean communities, Ostinato Records presents timeless dance music for the summer by Conjunto Jovens Africanos, founded by Ze Orlando, a respected producer originally from São Tomé. Formed and originally based in Lisbon, the band fused raw Funaná rhythms from the Cape Verdean island of Santiago with syncopated electric guitars, raucous synthesizers, relentless percussion, and addictive vocals that kept their compatriots on their feet across little known Krioulu nightclubs in Europe's major cities. First released in 1984, Conjuntos Jovens Africanos' "Nhu Jhon" and "Volta Pa Terra" are stellar representations of modernized Funaná's endless energy.
Abu Obaida Hassan & His Tambour - The Shaigiya Sound of Sudan
V.A. - Synthesize The Soul: Astro - Atlantic Hypnotica From The Cape Verde Islands 1973 - 1988
V.A.
Synthesize The Soul: Astro - Atlantic Hypnotica From The Cape Verde Islands 1973 - 1988
2LP | 2017 | US | Original (Ostinato)
26,99 €*
Release:2017 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Through 18 diverse tracks, this compilation offers a timely revelation of how immigration to Europe and the United States from the Cape Verde Islands in the 1980s gave us an alternate history of electronic music, almost a decade ahead of its time, as traditional Funana rhythms met the synthesizer.
V.A. - Tanbou Toujou Lou: Meringue, Kompa Kreyo, Vodou Jazz, And Electric Folklore From Haiti 1960-1981
V.A.
Tanbou Toujou Lou: Meringue, Kompa Kreyo, Vodou Jazz, And Electric Folklore From Haiti 1960-1981
LP | 2016 | US | Original (Ostinato)
24,99 €*
Release:2016 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Selected from an array of private collections and radio archives in Brooklyn, New York, and multiple digging trips in Port-au-Prince, Jacmel, Gonaives, and St. Marc, are twenty tracks that encompass the vast diversity of styles during the seminal years of musical innovation and percussive potency in Haiti. From the legendary, elegant big band dance parties in iconic nightclubs of Port-au-Prince to the rhythms of the countryside; from accordion-driven meringue and Vodou-derived drum patterns, to hypnotic tenor sax arrangements and psychedelic interpretations of folklore, the music of 1960's, '70's, & '80's Haiti enjoys a royal repute across the Caribbean, West Africa, and the Colombian coast. Between the 1960s and 1980s, experimentation and electric reinterpretation of traditional rhythms was rife, along with the sophisticated balancing of a host of influences. There's the jazz-era instrumentation, brought during the early 20th century American occupation, which introduced horn sections to Haitian ensembles. Cuba, cultural imperator of the Afro-Atlantic and perennial ally of Haiti, imbued Meringue, Mambo, Son, Guajira, Charanga, and a slew of Afro-Cuban styles into the Haitian repertoire. Accordion-driven Colombian Cumbia and Dominican Merengue left their mark. A melting pot of sound was all held together by the countless rhythms, drum patterns, and percussion brought across the Atlantic from Africa, surviving slavery's violent cultural repression.
Temperance (Dominique Dalcan) - Temperance Volume 2
Temperance (Dominique Dalcan)
Temperance Volume 2
LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Ostinato)
28,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Pop
Last February, we had the delightful surprise to see Dominique Dalcan on the Victoires de la Musique stage (main French musical award). The elegant singer received the award for the best electronic album for his project Temperance, an album in English full of reliefs, dense and splendid. We are delighted to see today that Dominique publishes a second volume of Temperance. The first albums of Dominique Dalcan came out in the early 90's, especially on the Belgian label Crammed Discs. He is considered one of the ambassadors of the new French pop, combining electronic and orchestral arrangements. At the same time, under the name of Snooze, he immerses himself in electronic music and creates soundtracks for cinema and contemporary art. In 2013, he switched to the English language and adopted a new artistic identity: Temperance. The project moves away freely from the format of the song to dive into a vast electronic palette. In Temperance 2, we hear contemporary R & B ballads full of artificial strings, collisions of textures, even Balinese sounds but nothing that never steals the show with Dominique's voice and lyrics. The Temperance repertoire addresses the confusion of the human world and a wild nature. There is also a question of fusional love with pop and soul songs. This gives an album that rushes against each other joy, fury, despair, desire or pleasure, without them ever contradicting each other, and that moderates with art and temperance, in short.
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