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Pure Pleasure Vinyl, CD & Tape 174 Items

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Lonnie Liston Smith & The Cosmic Echoes - Visions Of A New World Remastered Edition
Lonnie Liston Smith & The Cosmic Echoes
Visions Of A New World Remastered Edition
LP | 1965 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
29,99 €*
Release:1965 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

Pianist Lonnie Liston Smith began his true professional career with Pharoah Sanders and then moved on to the very electric Miles Davis band before embarking on his own journey -- one that took him deep into the waters of pop music and disco by the late '70s. On Visions of a New World, Smith, accompanied by his working unit the Cosmic Echoes, digs deeper into the soul-jazz vein that he had begun exploring on Expansions and Funk Extraction in 1973 and 1974, respectively. In 1975, Smith was looking for a smoother, more soulful groove than he had displayed previously. Elements of the earlier band are in evidence: Vocalist Donald Smith is still on board, as are Dave Hubbard and Cecil Bridgewater on horns. Reggie Lucas even helps out on guitar in one or two places, and Ray Armando helps the percussion section. Despite these fiery players, the music here is strictly a late-night seduction/meditation groove. Tracks like the opener, "A Chance for Peace," keep the funk in mid-tempo while rounding off the edges, but "Love Beams" sounds exactly like its name. "Colours of the Rainbow" is a duet between Donald and Lonnie on keyboard and vocals, and "Devika" is the first place where the groove exceeds the mood. Latin rhythms, loosely woven horn lines, funky backbeats, and a slinky melody bring the whole thing up a couple of notches. The only other place the album heats up is on the final two tracks: the second part of the title suite -- when Donald Smith stops singing -- and "Summer Nights," when the concentration is on pure movement and sweaty, shimmering late-night funk. - ThomJurek/AMG

Recorded in 1975 at Electric Lady Studios
Stanley Turrentine - Sugar
Stanley Turrentine
Sugar
LP | 1971 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1971 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Recorded: November 1970 in Rudy Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA
Lyman Woodard Organization - Don't Stop The Groove
Lyman Woodard Organization
Don't Stop The Groove
LP | 1979 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
35,99 €*
Release:1979 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
When Cobb's Corner nightclub owner Henry Normile was murdered, followed by the in-street shooting and death of Eddie Jefferson, the heart of the Detroit jazz scene was ripped apart. Through the advent of the Labor Day Montreux-Detroit Jazz Festivals starting in 1980, things picked back up measurably, but the club scene has never been the same. This live recording of the Lyman Woodard Organization, which was taped the day before Normile was killed in his next door apartment, more than any other album or event exemplified the never say die spirit of Motor City jazz. It also was a hallmark for a unique style of the music, an urban rhythm & blues infused contemporary jazz that stood tall for both listeners and dancers during the tail-end of the disco movement. Woodard was in his prime, determined that his idea was singular, and went beyond soul-jazz into a realm where only he could claim ownership. With guitarist Robert Lowe and saxophonist Allan Barnes, who would both go on to national acclaim as leaders, the Organization was a powerhouse in live performance not to be denied, and for sure a solid sending crowd pleaser. A much better recording than his studio cult classic "Saturday Night Special", this live set laid the groundwork for the continuation of Woodard's career for decades to come, and showed his fellow Detroiter's that better days lay ahead. Where the title track is happy and a bit more commercial than the rest with its slinky, straight, fingerpopping, sublime beat and seductive vocal line, "Disco Tease" prances along in a hard rock vein with conga accents from Lorenzo Brown and chicken scratch, dramatic guitar chords from Lowe. "Down Lowe" is a concrete, fatback groove from the guitarist, while "Djarum" turns the wick down in a slow, sexy nightshade visage, with Kerry Campbell's soprano sax expanding the horn section with Woodard's organ in stretched out phrases. The appropriately titled "Theme In Search Of A Sports Spectacular" is the killer track, as trumpeter Marcus Belgrave joins the band in an Olympic sprint, an irresistible melody that is catchy, infectious, memorable, and anthematic as any warrior clarion call to battle in the athletic arena. This driven, tenacious, forceful piece of music still stands the test of time for its ferocious attitude and champion-like strut. This recording documents not only the darkest days, but the bright hope a financially strapped Detroit offers to the rest of the world, and the determination Woodard always exemplified.
Shamek Farrah - First Impressions
Milt Jackson - Sunflower
Milt Jackson
Sunflower
LP | 1973 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
26,99 €*
Release:1973 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Recorded over two days in December of 1972 at Rudy Van Gelder's Englewood, New Jersey home studio, vibraphonist Milt Jackson's "Sunflower" is the first -- and best -- of his three albums for Creed Taylor's CTI imprint. (And one of the finest offerings on the label.) With a core band consisting of Herbie Hancock (playing electric and acoustic piano), bassist Ron Carter, drummer Billy Cobham, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, drummer/percussionist Ralph McDonald, and guitarist Jay Berliner. A chamber orchestra exquisitely arranged and conducted by Don Sebesky adorns the session as well. Jackson's "For Someone I Love", opens the five-tune set, with Berliner playing solo flamenco guitar before the vibes, trumpet, and elements from the chamber orchestra delicately, impressionistically color the background. It gradually moves into a languid, bluesy ballad that slowly gains in both texture and dynamic until the strings trill tensely. Hubbard and Hancock engage them in solos that gently swing out the tune. The reading of Michel Legrand's "What Are You Doing for the Rest of Your Life" is a gorgeous showcase for Jackson; his solo dominates the arrangement. Carter gets downright funky on his upright to introduce Thom Bell's "People Make The World Go Round," and Hancock follows him on Rhodes. Jackson takes the melody, striking a layered contrast as Hubbard slips around all three playing an extension of the melody with requisite taste, fluidity, and taut phrasing. Hancock gets funky to the bone in his brief solo, as the vibes soar around and through his phrases. The title track is a Hubbard composition that floats and hovers with a Latin backbeat before shifting tempos as the solos begin. The expanded harmonic palette of trumpet with the reeds, woodwinds, and strings on the melody add an exotic textural palette for his solo. Jackson's "SKJ" closes the set with an old-school, swinging hard bop blues with barely detectable embellishments by Sebesky. While "Sunflower" sometimes feels more like a group session rather than a Jackson-led one, that's part of its exquisite beauty.
Jamie Cullum - Pointless Nostalgic
Max Roach - We Insist!
Max Roach
We Insist!
LP | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Special hi-quality 180 gram limited edition. Audiophile mastering and pressing!
J. B. Lenoir - Alabama Blues
Betty Carter - Now It's My Turn
Stevie Ray Vaughan - Couldn't Stand The Weather
Idris Muhammed - Kabsha
Idris Muhammed
Kabsha
LP | 1980 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
29,99 €*
Release:1980 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London



This little-known album by New Orleans-born drummer Idris Muhammad (1939-2014) was originally recorded for Theresa at Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New Jersey on September 12, 1980 with George Coleman & Pharoah Sanders on tenor saxophones & Ray Drummond on bass.

The six powerful tracks include originals from Muhammad & Drummond and an impressive version of Billy Eckstine's 'I Want To Talk About You' featuring Sanders.

'Kabsha', which is dedicated to Muhammad's youngest daughter, is recommended to anyone who appreciates inventive and passionate modern jazz.



Drummer Idris Muhammad's strongest jazz date as a leader. Muhammad, who had often been heard in funky or more commercial settings, really excels in this sparse setting, showing off what he learned from hearing bands in his native New Orleans. In addition, both the underrated Coleman and Sanders are heard in top form, stretching out on originals, basic pieces, and "I Want to Talk About You" (during which Sanders lets out a few trademark screams so everyone knows that he is not John Coltrane). Highly recommended. Scott Yanow/AMG
Cecil McBee - Mutima
Cecil McBee
Mutima
LP | 1974 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
27,99 €*
Release:1974 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
A landmark recording in early creative improvised modern music, bassist Cecil McBee's recording for the Strata East label is an important document introducing him as a leader from the international jazz-based scene in New York City via his native Tulsa, OK and following a brief mid-'60s stint in Detroit. McBee as a pure musician has staggering technique, rich harmonic ideas, and an indefatigable swing, but it is as a composer that he is set apart from other musicians of this mid-'70s era. "Life Waves" is a stunning piece of composed and improvised music, with a brief clarion horn section setting off McBee's chordal strumming and harp bop drive. Trumpeter Tex Allen's brash lines, the incendiary tenor saxophonist George Adams, and more thoughtful alto saxophonist Allen Braufman dig into hefty but contrasting solos, while drummer Jimmy Hopps stokes the coals. The other premier piece, "Mutima", has a soaring longer melody switching on and off onto a samba palate that is pretty, beautiful, and much more introspective than other wild and woolly cuts. The legendary but under recognized flutist Art Webb shines on the floaty free "A Feeling", and the atypical but wholly contemporized "Tulsa Black", a portent to the music that would be made later in this time period by Sonny Fortune, and featuring the wah-wah electric bass guitar work of Cecil McBee, Jr. The two-minute "Voice Of The Seventh Angel" sports the disparity of a complex arrangement alongside the beautiful singing of a young Dee Dee Bridgewater, while the marathon "From Within" has McBee performing solo, but overdubbed on two basses in opposite stereo channels, using serene long-toned arco and static pizzicato in arresting sounds that meld into a bridge squawk reminiscent of the saxophone playing of bandmate Adams. In retrospect, McBee's great career was ostensibly launched well before this recording, having worked with prominently with Charles Lloyd, Alice Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders, Yusef Lateef, Charles Tolliver, and countless others. "Mutima" (translated as "unseen forces") undoubtedly solidified his stature and brilliance as a major player.
Dadisi Komolahe - Hassan's Walk
Dadisi Komolahe
Hassan's Walk
LP | 2019 | US | Original (Pure Pleasure)
29,99 €*
Release:2019 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Don’t let the date fool you, released back in 1983 this modal to slightly free jazz outfit from California takes you on a journey back to the late 60s and very early 70s, into the spiritual realms of greats like John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders, John McLaughlin and Miles Davis among others. A soul jazz treasure from the LA scene of the early 80s – a fantastic record that I rank with the best Strata East sides of the time! The group's led by alto saxophonist Dadisi Komolafe, and features vibes by Ricky Kelly, piano by Eric Tillman, bass by Roberto Miranda, and drums by Sunship Theus – all working together in a style that's infused with soulful, post-Coltrane exploratory energy, never going too far outside, and always staying true to the rhythmic pulse at its core. Kelly's vibes are really great – sparkling underneath solos by Komolafe that remind me a lot of Gary Bartz's earliest work.
Clifford Jordan Quartet - Glass Bead Games
Clifford Jordan Quartet
Glass Bead Games
2LP | 1973 | US | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
41,99 €*
Release:1973 / US – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
* Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London / Fifth part of the Strata-East Dolphy Series, Glass Bead Games is arguably the crown jewel of the Strata East movement, an amorphous genre that treads an unusual path between post-bop, 70’s avant-garde and spiritual jazz, with a groove.

Glass Bead Games is full of revelations at many levels. First, the decade of the 1970s did produce genuinely creative, "human" new music flowing from the jazz mainstream; second, Bill Lee was more than Spike's dad: he was a superlative bassist, a team player of the first order, a powerful catalyst who, if anything, deserves to be better known than his son; third, Billy Higgins was, as so many musicians insist, a once-in-a-lifetime drummer—the bellows inspiriting the collective flame.

Most importantly, Clifford Jordan was an artist of the first order, his playing so effortless and unforced, unselfconscious and focused, mature and wise that, at a time when altissimo fury was all the rage, it's small wonder his authentic voice frequently went unheard. His musical rhetoric is so personally expressive, its substance so compelling, the listener couldn't care less about the extraordinary technique required to convey its captivating message. Compared to some of his more acclaimed peers he's a less aggressive yet paradoxically more directive and shaping influence. The climaxes, rather than spelled out, are merely suggested, registering with deep and lasting impact on the listener. It all comes down to learning the language, those precious little beads. Not every player, including Jordan or the listener, can use it like Shakespeare, but all can learn to read Shakespeare and understand its principles of arbitrariness and serendipity, of invariance and transformation.

Jordan, no less than Shakespeare, requires a like-minded cast of players—in this case four musicians of such redoubtable proficiency that each remains committed to keeping the beads in play. He's not a man content with a mere musical "dialogue" with his fellow musicians nor is he about to take the initiative in pulling his troops up to his level. Instead he begins to tell a musical story that's so compelling his three comrades are inspired equally to contribute to a collaborative narrative. This is brilliant music-making by a Coltrane- influenced successor who feels no obligation to mime the predecessor. It may be the most significant saxophone performance on record since Coltrane and, providing the listener stays with it for any length of time, the most deeply satisfying. Jordan's game—so effortless, unforced, and "level"—erases distinctions between composed and improvised, soloist and ensemble, narrator and narrative, the dancer and the dance. It seems incapable of wearing out its welcome.
Cab Calloway - Cab Calloway
Cab Calloway
Cab Calloway
LP | 1956 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1956 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
From 1932 to the late 1940’s the period covered by this set, Cab had an orchestra that was about as swinging a band of solid senders as you’d find on the big-band circuit.
Cab projects, in his singing on records, something of the vital magic of his stage presence, a boundless exuberance and enthusiasm. His orchestral backing during the Thirties and Forties included many well-known names in jazz. At various times, Milt Hinton, Danny Barker and Cozy Cole were in his rhythm section.The reeds included the late, great Chu Berry as well as Ben Webster. Dizzy Gillespie was in the band, some members of which, at odd moments, served as a laboratory for the style to be called Bop. »This whole new chord structure idea was interesting to me,« Milt Hinton recalled, »and I would walk the new chords behind his playing.« Cab wasn’t the least enthusiastic. Danny Barker quoted him as saying, »I don’t want you playing that Chinese music in my band.«
The main attraction, however, was always Cab—showman, singer, entertainer. Most audiences didn’t even know that some of his sidemen were candidates for the jazz hall of fame. And that was as it should be. The musicians’ first function was to provide musical backing and a musical setting for the man who was being called 'King of the Hipsters', and this they did, wonderfully well. It was as Barry Ulanov noted in Metronome (January, 1943) a band extraordinary in every respect, hailed for its »clean musicianship, its jazz kicks, its brilliant showmanship«.
Billy Harper - Capra Black
Sam Dees - The Show Must Go On
Sam Dees
The Show Must Go On
LP | 1975 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1975 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The best R&B songwriter and soul singer that most people have never heard of, Sam Dees has written songs for countless artists, including Gladys Knight, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, George Benson, the Temptations, Teddy Pendergrass, Millie Jackson, Jackie Wilson, the Manhattans, Regina Belle, KC & the Sunshine Band, Willie Clayton, and many others. He's also a pretty fine singer, having recorded for the Chess, Atlantic, Polydor, and SSS labels, and he had a nice string of his own hits in the 1970s. His 1975 Atlantic album The Show Must Go On has long been regarded by Southern soul aficionados as one of the best of the genre. Sounding a bit like a deeper-voiced Curtis Mayfield (in both style and theme), Dees sings with assurance, wisdom, passion, and a whole lot of soul here. Songs like "Child of the Streets", "Troubled Child," & "What's It Gonna Be," share Mayfield's commitment to social commentary, and Dees knows his way around a love song, too. It's absolutely essential.
Cesaria Evora - Cafe Atlantico
Cesaria Evora
Cafe Atlantico
2LP | 1999 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
39,99 €*
Release:1999 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The glorious "Café Atlantico" finds Césaria Évora venturing into more Latin American musical landscapes, as opposed to Portuguese, which dominated her previous albums. Évora draws from traditional Cuban and Brazilian music to mesmerizing effect. The album is also a tribute to her home town of Mindelo, on the Cape Verdean island of Sao Vicente, which was once a busy port with sailors cruising between South America, the Caribbean, and Portugal. Therefore, the music is heartbreaking and nostalgic, warm and tragic all at once. The masterful "Carnaval de Săo Vicente" is one of the most joyous, bittersweet party songs ever put on wax (and was even issued as a maxi-single with fantastic remixes). "Roma Criola" is tragic, lonely, destitute, and always interesting, making for an undiscovered masterpiece of a ballad, and her rendition of the Spanish language standard "Maria Elena" is absolutely heartbreaking. The album evokes a moody elegance rarely found in modern music, from the sweeping opener "Flôr Di Nha Esperança" to the summery "Amor Di Mundo", and the picture she paints of this café at the end of the world is a gorgeous, multi-colored, and emotion-stirring palate. This album is nothing short of world class and will be enjoyed by generations to come.
Canned Heat - Boogie With Canned Heat
Sonny Rollins & Coleman Hawkins - Sonny Meets Hawk
Sonny Rollins & Coleman Hawkins
Sonny Meets Hawk
LP | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
26,99 €*
Release:UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Special hi-quality 180 gram limited edition. Audiophile mastering and pressing!
Stanley Cowell & Billy Harper & Others - Such Great Friends
Joe Bonner - Impressions Of Copenhagen
Jimmy Giuffre - Western Suite
Champion Jack Dupree - Blues From The Gutter
Stacey Kent - Breakfast On The Morning Tram
Phil Woods - Rights Of Swing
Bill Evans & Jim Hall - Undercurrent
B. B. King - Singin' The Blues
June Christy - The Cool School
Art Blakey - The Jazz Messengers
Top Topham - Ascension Heights
Quicksilver Messenger Service - Quicksilver Messenger Service
Cab Calloway - Hi De Hi De Ho
Bobbie Gentry - Ode To Billie Joe
Stacey Kent - In Love Again
Robert Pete Williams With Big Joe Williams - Robert Pete Williams With Big Joe Williams
Quicksilver Messenger Service - Happy Trails
Motörhead - 1916
Mississippi Fred McDowell - I Do Not Play No Rock'N'Roll
Laurindo Almeida Quartet - Brazilliance
Eddie Boyd - 7936 South Rhodes
Smiley Lewis - I Hear You Knocking
Nancy Harrow - Wild Women Don't Have The Blues
Louis Prima - The Wildest
Lonnie Johnson - Portraits In Blues Vol. 6
Keb' Mo' - Keb' Mo'
Joe Pass - Sounds Of Synanon
Harry Sweets Edison & Earl Hines - Earl Meets Harry
Georgie Fame - Cool Cat Blues
Dexter Gordon - Manhattan Symphonie
T-Bone Walker Sings The Blues - T-Bone Walker Sings The Blues
Only Ones, The - The Only Ones
Leadbelly - Huddie Leadbetter's Best
Charles Mingus And His Jazz Groups - Mingus Dynasty
Budd Johnson & Earl Hines - Mr Bechet
Annie Ross Sings A Song With Mulligan! - Annie Ross Sings A Song With Mulligan!
Rosemary Clooney & Duke Ellington - Blue Rose
Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy - Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy
John Lee Hooker - Get Back Home In The Usa
Memphis Slim - Usa
Lightnin' Hopkins - In New York
Johnny Shines - Last Night's Dream
Jazz Artists Guild - Newport Rebels
Otis Spann - The Biggest Thing Since Colossus
Machito - Kenya
Blues Jam At Chess - Blues Jam At Chess
Babatunde And Phenomena - Levels Of Consciousness
Babatunde And Phenomena
Levels Of Consciousness
LP | 1979 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1979 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
This reissue of an LP cut for the Theresa label contains plenty of exciting music. Percussionist Babatunde Lea takes stirring solos and constantly inspires the ensembles and soloists during a generally high-powered set. The musicians were all based in San Francisco at the time, including guest soloists trumpeter Eddie Henderson and trombonist Julian Priester. The music is Afro-Cuban jazz with bits of 1970s electronics and funk added to the mix. But despite some R&B-ish vocals (which dominate a bit during the last few tracks) and commercial moments, the music is excellent, there are some strong solos.
Norman Williams And The One Mind Experience - The Bishop
Norman Williams And The One Mind Experience
The Bishop
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Bishop Norman Williams is an amazing musician. He not only has command of his instrument and music, but a great spirit that reflects a knowledge and love of his people and what they give the world — the same spirit shared by Satchmo, Bird, and Trane. Reign on, Bishop. Michael Howell Bishop Norman Williams is one of those unique talents in music. He has the gift of being able to say what he wants and at the same time say something always significant. He has many influences because he is open to all of the good music of the world. When you hear him play, you feel that he has assembled all of these 'world ideas' in music to speak through his horn. John Handy It’s time. It’s time for all to hear the Bishop proclaim spiritual truths in his church, the One Mind Temple, dedicated to the spirit of John Coltrane. The time is also overdue for all to hear the Bishop proclaim musical truths through the medium of his alto saxophone. My first few gigs in 1962 were with the Bishop’s band. I’ll never forget what an inspiration it was for me learning how to play while standing next to the Bishop, who already had it together. I’m sure after hearing the Bishop, you will also agree that his time has come. Eddie Henderson
Charles Tolliver / Music Inc & Orchestra - Impact
Charles Tolliver / Music Inc & Orchestra
Impact
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Trumpeter/flügelhornist Charles Tolliver often straddled the line between the lyricism of hard bop and the adventurous nature of the avant-garde. Released in 1975, "Impact" contained a stimulating progressive edge within an energetic large band (14 horns, eight strings, and rhythm section) format. Tolliver's arrangements are consistently bright and build momentum, while the soloists are given sufficient room to manoeuvre through the multiple textures. Featured soloists in the remarkable reed section include Charles McPherson, James Spaulding, George Coleman, and Harold Vick.
Pharoah Sanders - Journey To The One
Pharoah Sanders
Journey To The One
2LP | 1980 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
40,99 €*
Release:1980 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
* 180 gram double LP with gatefold sleeve

* Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

* What separates this LP from others is that it is a group playing under his leadership where he gives all others close to equal billing.

* A jazz essential with plenty of incorporated nontraditional instrumentation

* One of his best recording from his post Impulse career.
Eddie Harris - The In Sound
Eddie Harris
The In Sound
LP | 1965 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
29,99 €*
Release:1965 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

This is one of Eddie Harris' great records. The playing is inspired! What a band! Cedar Walton (piano) and Billy Higgins (drums), Lee Morgan's favourite rhythm section. The underrated but popular tenor saxophonist introduces his "Freedom Jazz Dance," which would become a jazz standard after featuring on Miles Davis' album Miles Smiles. Plays one of the earlier versions of "The Shadow of Your Smile," romps on "Love for Sale" and "'S Wonderful," and also performs "Born to Be Blue" and his own "Cryin' Blues." Harris is heard in prime form in a quartet/quintet with pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Billy Higgins, and part-time trumpeter Ray Codrington. A gem. - Scott Yanow/AMG

Recorded 1965
Engineer – Tom Dowd
Leon Thomas - Spirits Known And Unknown
Linda Hill - Lullaby For Linda
Linda Hill
Lullaby For Linda
LP | 2019 | US | Original (Pure Pleasure)
27,99 €*
Release:2019 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Featuring members of the Arkesta
Re-mastering by Kevin Gray
Produced by Tom Albach
Recorded & mixed by Dennis Moody in 1981
Linda Hill recorded this LP for Nimbus West in 1981 with fellow Arkestra members, including flautist Adele Sebastian. And it’s Sebastian’s vocal duet with Hill on the spiritual jazz epic “Leland’s Song” that opens this stunning LP. Hill’s ensemble also included the serious horn player Sabir Matteen, as well as bassist Roberto Miranda and drummer Everett Brown Jr., who would all go on to record LPs for Nimbus.



The Arkestra first started rehearsing at pianist Linda Hill’s house in the early ‘60s. “In a few months, we’d built up from seven or eight to about 18 cats, musicians started living there,” Tapscott wrote in his autobiography. “People got involved with the Arkestra like it was their life’s work.” Hill took the role seriously, earning her the name of “the Ark’s matriarch” by Tapscott.
Gary Bias - East 101
Gary Bias
East 101
LP | 2019 | US | Original (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:2019 / US – Original
Genre:Organic Grooves
Recorded at City Recorders, 1981
Produced by Tom Albach & Co-produced by Gary Bias
Engineer – Dennis Moody
A beautiful, dreamlike expression of spiritual jazz recorded at a time when the idiom was completely out of vogue, Gary Bias' East 101 remains little known even by cult-classic standards, but its free-flowing approach demands attention from listeners who believe this kind of LP ceased to exist somewhere around the late 1970s. Recorded with a stellar supporting cast including vibist Rickey Kelly, bassist Roberto Miranda, and pianist David Tillman, Bias unspools a suite of deeply soulful and profoundly far-reaching original compositions that vividly evoke the blue skies of the record's Los Angeles origins. His flute and soprano saxophone somehow divine gravitas from weightlessness, creating music that challenges as much as it comforts.
Adele Sebastian - Desert Fairy Princess
Adele Sebastian
Desert Fairy Princess
LP | 1981 | US | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
29,99 €*
Release:1981 / US – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Adele Sebastian was an Afro American jazz flutist and singer, active from the early 70s (when she was still a teenager) until her untimely death at the age of 27 (!) in 1983 from a kidney failure. In fact she had been depending on monthly dialysis to stay alive for years. She lived through and for the music and you can hear it on her only solo album “Desert Fairy Princess” which was first issued in 1981. The mostly acoustic instrumentation brings a very natural and therefore rather retrospective sound considering the year the album was recorded. Adele and her band pull it off right from the start as if it had been 1966 and it was time for a revolution to shake the dust from the old time jazz. In a perfect way she mixes classic American vocal jazz elements with playful and more free passages, Latin music and tribal African sounds in the lengthy and quite rhythm oriented “Man From Tanganyika” and makes the title track start with a mystical “Allahu akbar“ chant while it turns more and more into a dark and gloomy song with something like a psychedelic edge reminiscent of Pharoah Sanders on his early works. Wild rhythms from drums, percussions with tons of bells and chimes weave a thick groove carpet and conjure a magical atmosphere. Those jazz aficionados who love the mid 60s John Coltrane, his sidekick Pharoah Sanders and Alice Coltrane will go crazy for this album.
Charles Brackeen - Rhythm X
Charles Brackeen
Rhythm X
LP | 1973 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1973 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
On this record, the little-known Charles Brackeen brings his saxophone to a party with most of Ornette Coleman's band. As might be expected, while Brackeen certainly holds his own, it's Ornette's boys who bring the thunder, playing around Brackeen's muscular alto as if they were a gang jumping on a new member. Haden's bass playing provides the frantic pulse, here and there ceding the stage to Blackwell's flexible drumming and dropping out to provide rolling sheets of sound by bowing his instrument. Brackeen and Cherry wrestle across this solid bedrock, with results that are often surprising and never short of beautiful.
Phil Ranelin - The Time Is Now
Phil Ranelin
The Time Is Now
LP | 1974 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1974 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Phil Ranelin's first record as a leader is worlds away from his later 1976 offering, "Vibes From the Tribe". "The Time Is Now" is a vanguard jazz record, full of the spirit, determination, and innovation inspired by John Coltrane, Eric Dolphy, Cecil Taylor, Pharoah Sanders, and Archie Shepp. Recorded in 1973 and 1974 and released at the end of 1974, the set shows Ranelin to be an imposing composer and frightfully good trombonist. The original album contained six compositions that are a deep musical brew of avant-garde improvisation, hard bop jazz esthetics, and soulful melodic ideas that were superimposed as a jump off point for both harmonic and rhythmic (read: Latin) invention. The stamp of Detroit is all over this thing. Tracks like the title and "Black Destiny" reflect the anger and vision of the era, while moving it all in a positive musical direction. Soloists on the set include the rest of the Tribe collective -- Marcus Belgrave and Wendell Harrison -- as well as local players who deserved far more than they received in terms of national recognitions: bassist Reggie 'Shoo-Be Doo' Fields, trumpeter Charles Moore, pianist Keith Vreeland, drummer Bill Turner, and others including Ranelin himself. The arrangements on "The Time Is Now" were ahead of their time, clustering a rhythm section as part of the horn's front line ("13th and Senate" and the title track) and a stylistic angularity that reflected both musical history and futurism in jazz and R&B ("Time Is Running Out" and "Times Gone By"). "The Time Is Now" is a must for any vanguard jazz aficionado or anyone interested in the strange, rhythm-oriented evolution of Detroit music.
Charles Lloyd Quartet, The - Love-In
Charles Lloyd Quartet, The
Love-In
LP | 1967 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1967 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Four-and-a-half decades after the event, saxophonist Charles Lloyd's "Love-In", recorded live at San Francisco's Fillmore Auditorium in 1967, the counterculture's West Coast music hub, endures as much as an archaeological artifact as a musical document. From sleeve designer Stanislaw Zagorski's treatment of Rolling Stone photographer Jim Marshall's cover shot, through the album title and some of the track titles ("Tribal Dance", "Temple Bells"), and the inclusion of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's "Here There And Everywhere", "Love-In's" semiology reeks of the acid-drenched zeitgeist of the mid 1960s, a time when creative music flourished, and rock fans were prepared to embrace jazz, provided the musicians did not come on like their parents: juicers dressed in sharp suits exuding cynicism.
It is likely that more joints were rolled on "Love-In's" cover than that of any other jazz LP of the era, with the possible exception of saxophonists John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" (Impulse!, 1965) and Pharoah Sanders's "Tauhid" (Impulse!, 1967). Chet Helms, a key mover and shaker in the West Coast counterculture, spoke for many when he hailed the Lloyd quartet as »the first psychedelic jazz group«.
It is to Lloyd's credit that, at least in the early stages of his adoption by the counterculture, he resisted dumbing down his music. The adoption stemmed from Lloyd's espoused attitude to society, his media savvy, his sartorial style and his sheer nerve in playing jazz in the temples of rock culture. He took the quartet into the Fillmore West three years before trumpeter Miles Davis took his into the Fillmore East.
So "Love-In" comes with a load of baggage, some of it less than fragrant. But as 45 minutes of music, it still has legs. Lloyd's vocalized tenor (and flute on two tracks) has Coltrane-derived muscle; the young Jarrett's lyrical and funky solos, particularly on his 07:55 showcase, the gospel-ish "Sunday Morning", his two featured originals ("Sunday Morning" and the soul jazz-ish "Is It Really the Same?"), and his playing the strings of the piano directly with his hands, all remain compelling; McClure and DeJohnette are solid and inventive.
John Gordon - Step By Step
John Gordon
Step By Step
LP | 1976 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1976 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
John Gordon, a trombone master, brings us another gem from that most renowned of 70’s record labels, Strata-East. The trombone is a difficult instrument. In the hands of an artist like John Gordon, however, it can create vivid images and conjure up beautiful music. And when the cohort of other players includes the likes of Charles Tolliver & Stanley Cowell, you know you’re in for an extra treat.
Phil Ranelin - Vibes From The Tribe
Phil Ranelin
Vibes From The Tribe
LP | 1971 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1971 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Phil Ranelin was a session trombonist recording with the likes of Steve Wonder before setting up the Tribe label with Wendell Harrison in Detroit.
Like other contemporary artist run labels like Strata East and Black Jazz, Tribe releases were characterised by a heady mix of post Coltrane free jazz, soul and funk, all informed by a strong political conscience.
"Vibes From the Tribe" is a fine record. The title track is lusciously, greasily funky and stands in pretty stark contrast to the kind of airbrushed fusion that was in vogue at the time. "Sounds From The Village" is even better (and dirtier), showcasing Ranelin's oily trombone gymnastics and a viciously fuzzed guitar solo. "Wife" features Phil's singing and is oddly reminiscent of Frank Zappa's writing on "Sleep Dirt"; an affecting, snaking melody topped off with a beautiful solo from the leader, whose playing here has the grace of Bob Brookmeyer coupled with the agility of George Lewis.
"He The One We All Knew" is the obligatory Coltrane tribute and is a trip into the kind of groove based free playing typical of Pharoah Sanders, though only really picks up when the band launch into post bop swing mode in the last six minutes or so, provoking another fine Ranelin solo. Bassist Ralph Armstrong is particularly strong here; his brief solo passages are a wonder of agility and tough lyricism that make me wonder why he's not better known. Other highlights come from the mellifluous flute of Wendell Harrison. Beautiful stuff, and it's good to know that Ranelin is still at work even now. Essential.
Cecil Payne - Zodiac
Cecil Payne
Zodiac
LP | 1973 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1973 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
It's impossible to talk about this album without acknowledging the spectre of death that hangs over it - not only is it the third entry in Strata-East Records' Dolphy Series, a collection of archival recordings from some of the label's close associates honoring the recently deceased multi-instrumentalist, but it is actually dedicated to two members of the band, Wynton Kelly and Kenny Dorham, who died in between the recording sessions and its release. The point is driven home even further by the fact that the album begins with a tribute from Payne to the fallen Martin Luther King, Jr., a piece that acts as a de facto solo for Dorham - his playing all rosy elegance and regal warmth - before shifting into the lighter (though equally coolly-paced) "I Know Love," a showcase for Payne's sax. While not the most somber jazz track ever recorded, this opening suite is a low-key and mournful way to open the affair, but thankfully the album really picks off and shows these musicians more in their element the rest of the way.

"Girl, You Got a Home" is a funky piece, beginning very soulfully with some tight interplay among the rhythm section of Kelly, bassist Wilbur Ware and drummer Albert Heath. Ware is in especially fine form on this track, tying together the disparate passages of the piece by grounding the more ponderous moments in a deep funk, while Kelly's playing is especially ear catching in the way he stabs at his piano like it's an organ. After the first two tracks take up nearly twenty minutes, the four-minute "Slide Hampton" feels almost impossibly brief, a feeling that's enhanced by its quick, jittery, and infectious rhythm, driven by some really dexterous work from Kelly. The final track, "Flying Fish," may be the album's highlight, a Caribbean-inspired composition that casts the rhythm section as flighty ground for both Payne and Dorham to vamp on. The track is oddly danceable for something released on Strata-East, maybe the most fun moment ever for the label, and relentlessly uptempo. Though this release may be in part defined by the deaths that preceded it, it's clear that the recording process was actually a lot of fun for everybody, as their enthusiasm and energy jumps right out of the speakers. This is one of the first Strata East records I really got into and is still one of my favorites, a must-hear for any fans of the flightier moments of Dorham or Kelly's career, and a fitting tribute for both master musicians.
Billy Parker's Fourth World - Freedom Of Speech
Billy Parker's Fourth World
Freedom Of Speech
LP | 1975 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1975 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Most of the musicians who gathered to record this fantastic spiritual jazz record for the Strata-East label on May 24th, 1974 had crossed each other's paths in various musical pairings over the preceding few years. Husband and wife team Dee Dee Bridgewater (vocals) and Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet) had been working together on albums like Frank Foster's "Loud Minority", and Roy Ayers' "Coffy" and "Virgo Red". Ten weeks before the "Freedom Of Speech" session, the couple had been joined in Tokyo by Cecil's brother Ronald Bridgewater (tenor saxaphone) to record Dee Dee's debut album, the beautiful "Afro Blue". Also in the studio on May 24th, 1974 was Donald Smith, (piano, vocals), fresh from recording on his older brother Lonnie Liston Smith's "Cosmic Funk" - on which Ronald Bridgewater had also played percussion. Cecil McBee (bass) was also there - just two weeks before, he'd completed his own Strata East date "Mutima", and in February he'd played on Mtume's "Rebirth Cycle" - with both albums also featuring Dee Dee Bridgewater on vocals. He'd also played on Lonnie Liston Smith's "Astral Travelling".
So 1974 was a huge year for all five of these people. Donald Smith and Cecil McBee were six months away from recording on Lonnie Liston Smith's massive "Expansions", with McBee fitting in a few Pharoah Sanders albums in between.
AND THEN, THE MYSTERY ... So with all this fervent activity, the question has to be asked ...Who was Billy Earl Parker Jr (drums), the leader of this session?
Billy Parker remains unlisted as a musician on all major jazz sites. His only other recording appears to be as a percussionist on Charles Tolliver's "Impact" in 1975.
Descendants Of Mike And Phoebe, The - A Spirit Speaks
Descendants Of Mike And Phoebe, The
A Spirit Speaks
LP | 1974 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
27,99 €*
Release:1974 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
One of the most unique albums on the Strata East label – and that's saying a heck of a lot, given the creative energies flowing through that legendary jazz outlet! "Descendents Of Mike & Phoebe" is a righteous little project put together by Spike Lee's father, Bill Lee, and his brothers and sisters (Cliff Lee, Grace Lee Mims, and Consuela Lee Moorhead) – working here in a group named after their slave ancestors, who are paid tribute in a beautifully flowing batch of tunes! Lee's round, warm bass tones are firmly at the head of the group on most numbers – recorded at a similar level to his excellent work with Clifford Jordan on Strata East during the same time – and other instrumentation includes piano from Consuela, flugelhorn from Cliff, and percussion from Sonny Brown and Billy Higgins – all used in a wonderfully evocative style that's even better than some of Lee's later soundtrack work. A few numbers feature vocals from Grace – singing wordlessly and with a really heavenly sort of quality – and together, the whole group have an undeniable sense of power and majesty, yet also one that's touched by a really personal sense of poetry too. Titles include a great version of Lee's "Coltrane", which was more famously recorded with Clifford Jordan.
Etta James - The Right Time
Thelonious Monk - Criss-Cross
Charles Lloyd - Dream Weaver
Charles Lloyd
Dream Weaver
LP | 1966 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
28,99 €*
Release:1966 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
The first studio date of the Charles Lloyd Quartet, with Keith Jarrett, Cecil McBee, and Jack DeJohnette, was recorded and released just a few days before the band took both the European and American festival circuits by storm. First came Europe, which was just getting the disc as the band was tearing up its stages. While the live dates are now the stuff of legend, it's easy to overlook the recordings, but to do so would be a mistake. "Dream Weaver" is a fully realized project by a band -- a real band -- in which each member has a unique part of the whole to contribute. Jarrett's unusual piano style fits musically with Lloyd's lyricism in a way that it shouldn't. Jarrett was even then an iconoclast, playing harmonic figures from the inside out and relying on counterpoint to create new spaces, not fill them in. (Just listen to "Autumn Sequence", where his solos and his backing harmonics are equally strident and inventive as Lloyd's Eastern explorations of mood and mode.) And then there's the rhythm section of McBee and DeJohnette, whose modal inventions on the intervals make the "Dream Weaver" suite an exercise in open time, allowing all players to wander around inside it and take what they want out. The set closes with a group party jam on "Sombrero Sam", with Lloyd and Jarrett trading eights on a Cuban variation on a fantasia. There were no records like this one by new groups in 1966.
George Benson - In Flight
George Benson
In Flight
LP | 1977 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
27,99 €*
Release:1977 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Simply one of the greatest guitarists in jazz history, George Benson is an amazingly versatile musician, whose adept skills find him crossing easily between straight-ahead jazz, smooth jazz, and contemporary R&B. Blessed with supreme taste, a beautiful, rounded guitar tone, terrific speed, a marvelous sense of logic in building solos, and, always, an unquenchable urge to swing, Benson's inspirations may have been Charlie Christian and Wes Montgomery, but his style is completely his own. Not only can he play lead brilliantly, he is also one of the best rhythm guitarists around, supportive to soloists and a dangerous swinger, particularly in a soul-jazz format. Yet Benson can also sing in a lush, soulful tenor with mannerisms similar to those of Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway, and it is his voice that has proven more marketable to the public than his guitar. Benson is the guitar-playing equivalent of Nat King Cole -- a fantastic pianist whose smooth way with a pop vocal eventually eclipsed his instrumental prowess in the marketplace -- but unlike Cole, Benson has been granted enough time after his fling with the pop charts to reaffirm his jazz guitar credentials, which he still does at his concerts.
In the wake of "This Masquerade", the balance of power shifted for the first time toward George Benson's suddenly marketable voice; four of the six tracks on "In Flight" are vocals. By this time, Benson was tailoring his tenor toward soulful pitch-bending à la Stevie Wonder on tunes as diverse as "Nature Boy" and "The World Is a Ghetto", and the unison scatting with the guitar that caught fire with the public on "Masquerade" is now pulled out whenever possible. Benson's backing band from "Breezin'", still set in its funk mode, is intact, and Claus Ogerman again contributes gentle orchestral cushions. The two instrumentals, particularly Donny Hathaway's "Valdez In The Country", prove that Benson remained a brilliantly inventive melodist on guitar, in full possession of his powers. Yet there is every indication here that Benson was set upon becoming primarily a pop star. By Richard S. Ginell/AMG

Recording: 1977 at Capitol Studios, Hollywood, by Al Schmitt
Production: Tommy Lipuma
Miroslav Vitous - Infinite Search
Dave Brubeck Trio, The & Gerry Mulligan - Blues Roots
Ben Webster - The Warm Moods
Hermeto Pascoal - Slaves Mass
Hermeto Pascoal
Slaves Mass
LP | 1977 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
14,99 €*
Release:1977 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Not strictly a jazz album in the strict sense, "Slaves Mass" has strong compositional themes among its seven tracks. The maestro Hermeto Pascoal plays everything from flutes, soprano saxophone, guitar, Fender Rhodes, acoustic piano and clavinet on this set, and enlists help from Ron Carter, Airto, Flora Purim, Raul DeSouza, David Maro and others. "Mixing Pot", is the opener and an anomaly in that it is a vanguard fusion tune where Pascoal really digs in and improvises. It also features the only appearance on this set of Alphonso Johnson on electric bass. In "Missa Dos Escravos", the title track, Pascoal's emblematic pig gives his first growls in a song dominated by Brazilian Indian references. Wonderfully and intricately composed, it centers around folk tropes. "Chorinho Para Ele" is a beautiful and modern choro with a somewhat challenging glissando bridge that really proposed new directions for the traditional genre. "Aquela Valsa" is a beautiful six/eight theme that turns into a samba with a beautiful trombone solo by DeSouza. "Cannon" is an utterly improvisational piece that meanders and winds around Pascoal's flute solo. Atonalism dominates the piano solo in "Escuta Meu Piano", which also presents bits and pieces of different styles (like bai?o) and folk songs. Hot samba improvisation is found in "Geléia de Cereja", that slips and slides through a variety of schema and dynamic changes without much internal focus, but it is a compelling bit of creative anarchy nonetheless in that it displays Pascoal's full range of restless musical and textural impulses -- as well as a beautiful soprano solo.
Melvin Taylor - Plays The Blues For You
Melvin Taylor
Plays The Blues For You
LP | 1984 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
26,99 €*
Release:1984 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
Guitarist Melvin Taylor's fluid, smartly constructed solos and understated yet winning vocals are surprises on this 1984 nine-track set recorded for Isabel. Taylor is not a fancy or arresting singer but succeeds through his simple, effective delivery of lyrics, slight inflections, and vocal nuances. His guitar work is impressive, with skittering riffs, shifting runs, and dashing solos. Organist/pianist Lucky Peterson is an excellent second soloist, adding cute background phrases at times, then stepping forward and challenging or buttressing Taylor's playing with his own dazzling lines.
George Benson - Give Me The Night
George Benson
Give Me The Night
LP | 1980 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
26,99 €*
Release:1980 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
This is the peak of George Benson's courtship of the mass market -- a superbly crafted and performed pop album with a large supporting cast -- and wouldn't you know that Quincy Jones, the master catalyst, is the producer. Q's regular team, including the prolific songwriter Rod Temperton and the brilliant engineer Bruce Swedien, is in control, and Benson's voice, caught beautifully in the rich, floating sound, had never before been put to such versatile use. On "Moody's Mood", Benson really exercises his vocalese chops and proves that he is technically as fluid as just about any jazz vocalist, and he become a credible rival to Al Jarreau on the joyous title track. Benson's guitar now plays a subsidiary role -- only two of the ten tracks are instrumentals -- but Q has him play terrific fills behind the vocals and in the gaps, and the engineering gives his tone a variety of striking, new, full-sounding timbres. The instrumentals themselves are marvelous: "Off Broadway" is driving and danceable, and Ivan Lins' "Dinorah, Dinorah" grows increasingly seductive with each play. Benson should have worked with Jones from this point on, but this would be their only album together.
Freddie Hubbard - Straight Life
Terry Riley - In C
Terry Riley
In C
LP | 1968 | UK | Reissue (Pure Pleasure)
26,99 €*
Release:1968 / UK – Reissue
Genre:Organic Grooves
If ever there were a popular work of minimalism, one that stated its purpose so clearly it could not be mistaken, Terry Riley's legendary composition In C is the one. It is a work that needs no explanation for its pulsing sequences of pitch all centering around the 53 phases of no duration played on the note and its performances have been numerous - even if there have been relatively few recordings of it. The Bang on a Can all-stars have recorded perhaps the most innovative version of the work thus far, after Riley's own, which was issued in the 1960s on Columbia's long defunct Odyssey label. This version reads minimalism as popular music and popular music as, finally, classical. The Bang on a Can version is outrageously wonderful. This single repeated note, meditatively engaged and then played upon in modulation, is taken by Bang on a Can and torn apart, with gritty, urban vision, rock & roll energy, and pure New York street smarts. Using a wide array of instruments (from piano, vibes, glockenspiel, cello, Wu man's pipa, clarinet, mandolin, soprano saxophone, electric guitar, marimba, chimes, and bass) for 45 minutes, this mind-flexing composition is moved through the sequence of all these instrumentalists, each coloring it just a bit, moving it a tad further outside and into the future, the dynamics shift subtly and change, direction becomes fluid, and the drama becomes white-knuckle tense after such a meditative beginning and then releases again. This is the creation of language, tonal, timbral, and spatial. There is an architecture at work in this version that erects small towers of meaning in sound and piles them atop each other until a sonic Tower of Babel is finally fully erected. The pulse never stops; it never disengages no matter which instrument or group of instruments enters or leaves the fray. It is there, constant, always being born and always dying and being transformed, reincarnated as some other sound, some other phrase, but always identified by the pulse. This is more hypnotic than any rock & roll, and more powerful than any Beethoven symphony is taken in with openness. This is music - ultimately made by a truly gifted and disciplined ensemble that share a singularly optimistic vision for modern music - that can, and will, change your life.
Oscar Pettiford - Volume 2
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