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Radiation Roots Dub 6 Items

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Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come
Delroy Wilson
Better Must Come
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
The Jamaican dancehall artist known as John Wayne was born Norval Headley in 1962 in rural St Elizabeth. He first reached the studio in the early 1980s, recording “Racket Girls In Jackets” for the Root Out label, where you can already hear the fearsome skill unleashed by Wayne at the microphone, showing why he was a favourite of top-ranking sound systems such as Black Scorpio, Kilimanjaro, Jammy’s and Studio Mix. In 1983 he travelled to New York, appearing on a 12-inch of Sugar Minott’s “Jamming In The Street,” while the Hoo-Kim brothers paired him with Johnny Slaughter for “Rain Fall, Sun Shine.” That same year, Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee produced his only album, titled Boogie Down and issued by Vista Sounds in the UK. Because Striker had access to such killer rhythms, the album is a real treat. Opening track “Jailhouse” rides a slow “Queen Of The Minstrel” recut, patterned similar to Welton Irie’s “Army Life”; the aptly-named “Heavy Rhythm” recounts his skill at rhyming, “African Princess” praises black women over a sparse recut of “No More Will I Roam,” “Bend Your Back” speaks of various aspects of ghetto life, before Side One closes out with title track “Boogie Down” on the immortal “Late Night Blues” rhythm. On Side Two, “Bubble With Me” uses a “Drifter” recut to give a massive salute to Bunny Lee and the engineer Professor at King Tubby’s studio; “Too Greedy” rides a “Real Rock” recut while the self-referential “Go John Wayne Go” rides Johnny Osbourne’s great “Yo Yo,” the result so appealing that it gained airplay on John Peel’s influential radio show in England (and Wayne keeps up the pressure on “Murder Style” and closing number “Me Deep” too). Wayne scored a massive hit in 1985 when Jammy placed him on “Sleng Teng” for “Call The Police” and he went on to record for George Phang, King Tubby and Witty Henry before becoming a producer himself. Sadly, John Wayne died of kidney failure in 2014, so we are fortunate that Boogie Down captured the man at the peak of his powers.
John Wayne - Boogie Down
John Wayne
Boogie Down
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Delroy Wilson was one of the best-beloved vocalists in the history of reggae. Born in 1948 in the infamous slum of Trench Town, Wilson is regarded as Jamaica’s first child star, having signed a contract with future Studio One founder, Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd, at the tender age of thirteen. Wilson was blessed with a mellifluous voice and his strong range and expressive tone made him a natural for recording; equally excellent with originals and able to make any cover tune his own, young Delroy made an impact from the start. Early singles “Emy Lou” and “If I Had A Beautiful Baby” were jaunty ska love songs, yet much of Wilson’s most significant early work took the form of recorded taunts aimed at Coxsone’s rivals, most notably Prince Buster, the target of “I Shall Not Remove” and “Joe Liges.” Debut album I Shall Not Remove caused a sensation on release in 1964 and as Jamaican music evolved in the mid-60s the hits kept coming: reconfiguring The Tams’ “Dancing Mood” as a cool rock steady seemed to define the genre, while “Here Comes A Heartache” and “Never Conquer Me” were among the more sizeable hits. Delroy’s second album, Good All Over, was another landmark release of the early reggae phase, although he had already begun recording for other producers, most notably teaming with Bunny Lee for a smash rendition of The Isley Brothers’ “This Old Heart Of Mine.” As Jamaica geared up for an era-defining general election, Delroy Wilson and Bunny Lee captured the public’s imagination with “Better Must Come,” which topped the charts in 1971. The popularity of the song was such that leftist candidate Michael Manley adopted it as his campaign theme, leading to a landslide victory the following year. The Better Must Come album was recorded at Dynamic Sounds, then the best- equipped studio in the Caribbean region, with Bunny Lee in the producer’s chair and Sid Bucknor and Carlton Lee as resident engineers. In addition to the opening title track, there is a range of classic Delroy here: “Better To Be Loved” puts his soulful delivery over a creeping ‘John Crow’ organ skank; “Can’t Explain” describes the passionate allure of his new lover, while “It’s You I Love” grafts Delroy’s soulful tenor atop a sparse reggae riff, before “Dance With You” recalls a missed opportunity on the dancefloor. The determined “Try Again” is delivered in heavily accented patois, before Delroy drifts into reggae-funk territory with a killer cut of The Isleys’ “It’s Your Thing”; “Keep An Eye” warns of deceptive friends with ulterior motives and the organ-heavy “Drink Wine” salutes the uplifting qualities of fermented grapes, before closing things off with an alternate reading of Shep and The Limelights’ “Stick By Me.” Adding to the appeal is an individual drum sound, lively guitar picking and variations on the organ skank, keeping things interesting throughout.
Beany Man (Beenie Man) - The Invincible Beany Man (The Ten Year Old DJ Wonder)
Beany Man (Beenie Man)
The Invincible Beany Man (The Ten Year Old DJ Wonder)
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Dancehall superstar Beenie Man has enjoyed a career unmatched for its length and diversity. Born Moses Davis in 1973, he claims to have began toasting on his uncle’s sound system, Master Blaster, at five years old; during his harsh youth, he became a semi-wild creature of the streets and lived as a near homeless person, suffering from malnourishment, before music became his ultimate salvation. His debut recording, “Too Fancy,” was produced by political ‘enforcer’-turned-producer, Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes, after he won a popular talent contest where the price was a recording contract, though nothing much happened with that particular release. Beenie Man recorded his debut album for hit-making producer Bunny Lee, released as The Invincible Beany Man: The Incredible Ten Year Old DJ Wonder, while he was already a steady fixture on Lee’s Unlimited, a vintage sound system established in 1968 in Springfield, a small town in the eastern parish of Saint Thomas, and then one of Jamaica’s most prominent sets. On the album, his flow is well-honed, his chatter sounding entirely skilful and confident, the rhymes flowing from his mouth with ease and fervour. On one track, he even dares to compare himself to Bob Marley and as the future would prove, such bragging was not some idle boast! In the best dancehall tradition, the rhymes are relayed over the barest of electro synthesizer rhythms and the subject matter of the chatter is all over the place; on the opening track “Woman Labba Labba” he warns of loose female tongues, relates sound system battles on “Sound Boy Kuffing,” appeals to his peers to “Try Some Hustling” and decries the anatomy of thin ladies on “Bony Punanny” (over a harsh “Freedom Blues” recut); he praises the general allure of females on “Girls Nowadays,” warns of the potential of bothersome insects to ruin a romantic tryst on “Insects Nuh Bother We,” and relates the prevalence of gun crime and the negative impact of cocaine along the way, among many other topics. Even though the original track list was a bit out of sequence with the songs themselves, the youth’s incredible potential is entirely evident throughout.
Mighty Diamonds, The - Backstage
Mighty Diamonds, The
Backstage
LP | 1983 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1983 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
One of the greatest reggae vocal harmony trios of all time, The Mighty Diamonds formed in 1969 in Trench Town, the infamous west Kingston ghetto that gave rise to Bob Marley and the Wailers and countless other vocal groups. They began recording for Rupie Edwards in the early 1970s and cut soul covers for Stranger Cole and lesser-known producer, Roy Ross, before singing noteworthy material for Lee Perry, such as “Talk About It,” as well as backing hit singles such as Susan Cadogan’s “Hurt So Good.” Subsequent material for Bunny Lee was also popular, but the real breakthrough came when the deejay and producer Jah Lloyd introduced the group to the Hookim Brothers of Channel One, leading to a series of incredible hits and internationally acclaimed albums issued overseas by Virgin. Then, in the 1980s, after Virgin turned away from reggae, The Diamonds had another career boost through recordings for perceptive producer Gussie Clarke, who issued popular albums such as Changes and The Root Is There. The album Backstage was another fine set for Gussie, recorded at Dynamic Sounds studio in Kingston and issued in extended-play style, with each of the album’s six conscious late-roots tracks mixed to include dubs.
Judge Dread - Dreadmania (It’s All In The Mind)
Judge Dread
Dreadmania (It’s All In The Mind)
LP | 1972 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1972 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Dreadmania (It's All In The Mind) is Judge Dread's (nee Alexander Hughes) very first album, originally released by Trojan Records in 1972, and is a confirmed Ska and Skinhead Reggae classic. The least likely of reggae stars, the white, Brixton raised Dread had previously served as a club bouncer (where he met Derrick Morgan and Prince Buster), wrestler, bodyguard, DJ, and debt collector for Trojan Records, before hitting it big in 1972 with "Big Six" - inspired by Prince Buster's classic "Big 5" - which reached number 11 on the UK chart and sold nearly a half a million copies. On the back of that hit, and its follow up "Big Seven", the label quickly assembled an album to cash in on their success, and its title, Dreadmania, aptly summed up the state of the nation, as Judge Dread fever gripped the island. Of course, the two hits were included within, as was "Oh She Is a Big Girl Now," which was subsequently spun off as a single, and "Dr. Kitch," which later reappeared as a B-side. Appropriately enough, the Chuck Berry hit "Ding a Ling" was covered, and just in case there were any remaining doubts about the album's contents, there's even a track titled "Donkey Dick." "It's all in the mind/It's all in the mind/The rudeness it's all in the mind," the Judge ruled on the opening track. Perhaps, but Dread could make even a nun blush. He was the king of the double entendre, his clever wordplay and wit a revelation for the staid British. But he also captured the imagination of Jamaicans. Dread wrapped his rude lyrics within perfect reggae backdrops, with many of his songs built around classic Jamaican rhythms, adding further authenticity to his sound.
Sly & Robbie - Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby
Sly & Robbie
Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby
LP | 1990 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1990 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Lowell Dunbar and Robert Shakespeare are the renowned Jamaican rhythm section that has worked with a range of international stars, including Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, Joan Armatrading, Garland Jeffries and countless others. They first came to know each other in the early 1970s, when both were based in rival bands playing in clubs on Kingston’s Red Hills Road and started working together at Channel One studio in the mid-1970s, when Sly was musical arranger for the Revolutionaries house band and Robbie the main bassist for Bunny Lee’s Aggrovators. After a stint of international touring in Peter Tosh’s Word, Sound and Power band, which exposed them to the tastes and markets of overseas audiences, the pair joined forces more concertedly with their Taxi label, producing hits with Gregory Isaacs, Dennis Brown, Sugar Minott and the Wailing Souls. At the same time, as the driving force behind the Compass Point All Stars, they brought Grace Jones to prominence worldwide and made Gwen Guthrie a star through reggaefied disco, and then brought Black Uhuru into the top spot in the wake of Bob Marley’s passing. Then, when Jamaican music went digital with the “Sleng Teng” craze of the mid-1980s, Sly and Robbie made the shift in that direction too, becoming among the most prominent producers as the 80s gave way to the 90s. Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby is a digital dub salute to the King issued shortly after his terrible murder; it is mostly comprised of synthesizer re-cuts of classic Jamaican rhythms, with “Dub For Joy” being a tough re-working of the Heptones’ “Love Me Girl” and “Dub To Make You Move And Groove” a take on their “Party Time”; Dennis Brown’s “Here I Come” is here mutated to “Dub For Roots People” and his “Here I Come” anthem shifted into the spongy “Dub For All Seasons.” An intriguing offshoot of “Sleng Teng” is among the other highlights.
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