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Radiation Roots Reggae & Dancehall 21 Items

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Delroy Wilson - Better Must Come
Delroy Wilson
Better Must Come
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
The Jamaican dancehall artist known as John Wayne was born Norval Headley in 1962 in rural St Elizabeth. He first reached the studio in the early 1980s, recording “Racket Girls In Jackets” for the Root Out label, where you can already hear the fearsome skill unleashed by Wayne at the microphone, showing why he was a favourite of top-ranking sound systems such as Black Scorpio, Kilimanjaro, Jammy’s and Studio Mix. In 1983 he travelled to New York, appearing on a 12-inch of Sugar Minott’s “Jamming In The Street,” while the Hoo-Kim brothers paired him with Johnny Slaughter for “Rain Fall, Sun Shine.” That same year, Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee produced his only album, titled Boogie Down and issued by Vista Sounds in the UK. Because Striker had access to such killer rhythms, the album is a real treat. Opening track “Jailhouse” rides a slow “Queen Of The Minstrel” recut, patterned similar to Welton Irie’s “Army Life”; the aptly-named “Heavy Rhythm” recounts his skill at rhyming, “African Princess” praises black women over a sparse recut of “No More Will I Roam,” “Bend Your Back” speaks of various aspects of ghetto life, before Side One closes out with title track “Boogie Down” on the immortal “Late Night Blues” rhythm. On Side Two, “Bubble With Me” uses a “Drifter” recut to give a massive salute to Bunny Lee and the engineer Professor at King Tubby’s studio; “Too Greedy” rides a “Real Rock” recut while the self-referential “Go John Wayne Go” rides Johnny Osbourne’s great “Yo Yo,” the result so appealing that it gained airplay on John Peel’s influential radio show in England (and Wayne keeps up the pressure on “Murder Style” and closing number “Me Deep” too). Wayne scored a massive hit in 1985 when Jammy placed him on “Sleng Teng” for “Call The Police” and he went on to record for George Phang, King Tubby and Witty Henry before becoming a producer himself. Sadly, John Wayne died of kidney failure in 2014, so we are fortunate that Boogie Down captured the man at the peak of his powers.
Beany Man (Beenie Man) - The Invincible Beany Man (The Ten Year Old DJ Wonder)
Beany Man (Beenie Man)
The Invincible Beany Man (The Ten Year Old DJ Wonder)
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Dancehall superstar Beenie Man has enjoyed a career unmatched for its length and diversity. Born Moses Davis in 1973, he claims to have began toasting on his uncle’s sound system, Master Blaster, at five years old; during his harsh youth, he became a semi-wild creature of the streets and lived as a near homeless person, suffering from malnourishment, before music became his ultimate salvation. His debut recording, “Too Fancy,” was produced by political ‘enforcer’-turned-producer, Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes, after he won a popular talent contest where the price was a recording contract, though nothing much happened with that particular release. Beenie Man recorded his debut album for hit-making producer Bunny Lee, released as The Invincible Beany Man: The Incredible Ten Year Old DJ Wonder, while he was already a steady fixture on Lee’s Unlimited, a vintage sound system established in 1968 in Springfield, a small town in the eastern parish of Saint Thomas, and then one of Jamaica’s most prominent sets. On the album, his flow is well-honed, his chatter sounding entirely skilful and confident, the rhymes flowing from his mouth with ease and fervour. On one track, he even dares to compare himself to Bob Marley and as the future would prove, such bragging was not some idle boast! In the best dancehall tradition, the rhymes are relayed over the barest of electro synthesizer rhythms and the subject matter of the chatter is all over the place; on the opening track “Woman Labba Labba” he warns of loose female tongues, relates sound system battles on “Sound Boy Kuffing,” appeals to his peers to “Try Some Hustling” and decries the anatomy of thin ladies on “Bony Punanny” (over a harsh “Freedom Blues” recut); he praises the general allure of females on “Girls Nowadays,” warns of the potential of bothersome insects to ruin a romantic tryst on “Insects Nuh Bother We,” and relates the prevalence of gun crime and the negative impact of cocaine along the way, among many other topics. Even though the original track list was a bit out of sequence with the songs themselves, the youth’s incredible potential is entirely evident throughout.
Dillinger - Marijuana In My Brain
Dillinger
Marijuana In My Brain
LP | 1983 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1983 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
In the early 1970s, top-ranking toaster Lester Bullock got his start on the El Paso sound system in the mean streets of western Kingston. Initially known as Young Capone, since he was a protégé of the better-established Dennis Alcapone, he was renamed Dillinger by Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, the first producer to record a significant number of tracks with the youth. “Dub Organiser” and “Tighten Up Skank” were somewhat popular when released in 1973 and there were individual tracks cut for Phil Pratt, Augustus Pablo, Prince Tony Robinson and Joe Gibbs, as well as Studio One, who issued debut LP, Ready Natty Dreadie, in 1975. By then, Dillinger was recording a series of singles for hit-making produce Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee, particularly on Johnnie Clarke’s rhythms, though recordings for Channel One and the CB 200 album were what catapulted him into overseas consciousness in 1976, once the outstanding single, “Cokane In My Brain,” reached the European pop charts. Marijuana In My Brain dates from 1977 and placed the toaster over some of the Striker’s hottest rhythms, previously utilised for Johnnie Clarke scorchers like “Satta” and “Poor Marcus” (along with the odd Ronnie Davis track); Clarke’s reading of “Going To A Ball” is here transformed into an ode to the Bouncing Ball, then one of the most popular clubs for black Londoners, and his “African Roots” anthem gets the Dillinger treatment too. Of course, the title track was the biggest hit of the bunch, an ode to the ‘wisdom weed’ driven by cosmic space synth overdubs.
Sugar Minott - Leader For The Pack
Sugar Minott
Leader For The Pack
LP | 1985 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1985 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Sugar Minott is part of the pantheon of Jamaican roots reggae icons, one of a handful of singers that indelibly changed the course of the music and helped it reach a broader overseas audience. Raised next door to one of Jamaica’s most popular dancehalls, in the heart of a notorious west Kingston slum, Minott joined The African Brothers in the mid-1970s, making an impact with singles for Rupie Edwards, Clive Chin and Micron Music, as well as with self-produced work, but the breakthrough came when Sugar went solo for Studio One, spearheading the reuse of classic rhythms at the facility for new purpose. He later moved away from Studio One to record sparse work for Prince Jammy, Mikey Dread and other smaller producers but the main focus was Black Roots/Youth Promotion, the record label and sound system he established himself. Then, following smash hit “Good Thing Going,” Sugar helped to launch the careers of dancehall stars like Tenor Saw and Nitty Gritty. The Leader For The Pack album was produced by Bunny Lee in 1985 at The Rock studio in London, established by Gibraltarians Danny, Eddy and Henry. Sugar’s first fully synthesized album, it was arranged by Jackie Mittoo and revived classic rhythms of the past with minimal, synth-driven backing, including “Everybody Needs Love” as “This Is Rockers Music,” alongside a great cut of “Sleng Teng” for the title track; “Them Have To Come A We” was co-written by fellow icon, Gregory Isaacs.
Shorty The President - Fire Fire
Shorty The President
Fire Fire
LP | 1978 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1978 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Jamaican deejay Shorty The President may have been one of the more obscure figures to rise from the Kingston sound system scene, but the impact he made on vinyl recordings during the 1970s is no less important and his work remains coveted by reggae connoisseurs. Born Derrick Thompson in rural Trelawny in 1949, like many of his peers, he moved to the Jamaican capital as a teenager in search of better opportunities. As he gravitated to the Rastafari faith, an affiliation with the sound system Conquering Lion sparked interest from producer Rupie Edwards, who produced debut hits “President Mash Up The Resident” and “Yamaha Skank.” Edwards issued debut album Presenting Shorty The President in 1976 and after sparse work for Enos McLeod, Joe Gibbs, Pete Weston, Winston Riley and Keith Hudson, sophomore album Fire Fire was produced by Bunny Lee in 1978, with Shorty riding typically tough Aggrovators rhythms of the day, including Ronnie Davis’ updated version of Bob Marley’s “Kaya” and The Cables’ “Baby Why,” Delroy Wilson’s “Have Some Mercy” and Barry Brown’s take of Wilson’s “I’m Not A King,” as well as killer cuts of Brown’s “Natty Roots Hold Them” as “Roots Man” and “Best Thing In Life” as “Do My Thing.”
Trinity - Dreadlock Satisfaction
Trinity
Dreadlock Satisfaction
LP | 1979 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1979 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
The reggae artist known as Trinity is one of the music’s best-known rappers, known in Jamaica as “toasters” or “deejays” for their key work at the microphone on sound systems. Born Wade Brammer in1954 and raised in the tough streets of the Two Mile ghetto in western Kingston, an early preoccupation with the toasting styles of U Roy and Big Youth kept him away from crime, leading to a debut single as Prince Charming and more solid early work released under the name Prince Glen. Bonding closely with fellow deejay Dillinger brought another name change to Trinity at Channel One studio, which enabled his debut album, Shanty Town Determination, produced by Yabby You, and subsequent breakthrough material for Channel One and Joe Gibbs, the latter releasing “Three Piece Suit,” the blueprint for Althea and Donna’s “Uptown Top Ranking,” which would catapult Trinity to international stardom. Dreadlocks Satisfaction was produced by Bunny Lee for his Jackpot label in 1979, placing Trinity’s witty raps over some of Bunny’s most unusual rhythms, including alternate, rockers-styled Johnny Clarke takes of The Isley Brothers’ “This Old Heart Of Mine” and The Tams “Riding For A Fall,” plus Cornell Campbell’s takes of The Sensations’ “Every Day Is A Holiday” and The Heptones’ “Why Did You Leave”; Trinity also salutes Dillinger on a recut of John Holt’s “Linger A While”.
Mighty Diamonds, The - Backstage
Mighty Diamonds, The
Backstage
LP | 1983 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1983 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
One of the greatest reggae vocal harmony trios of all time, The Mighty Diamonds formed in 1969 in Trench Town, the infamous west Kingston ghetto that gave rise to Bob Marley and the Wailers and countless other vocal groups. They began recording for Rupie Edwards in the early 1970s and cut soul covers for Stranger Cole and lesser-known producer, Roy Ross, before singing noteworthy material for Lee Perry, such as “Talk About It,” as well as backing hit singles such as Susan Cadogan’s “Hurt So Good.” Subsequent material for Bunny Lee was also popular, but the real breakthrough came when the deejay and producer Jah Lloyd introduced the group to the Hookim Brothers of Channel One, leading to a series of incredible hits and internationally acclaimed albums issued overseas by Virgin. Then, in the 1980s, after Virgin turned away from reggae, The Diamonds had another career boost through recordings for perceptive producer Gussie Clarke, who issued popular albums such as Changes and The Root Is There. The album Backstage was another fine set for Gussie, recorded at Dynamic Sounds studio in Kingston and issued in extended-play style, with each of the album’s six conscious late-roots tracks mixed to include dubs.
Gregory Isaacs - Live At The Roxy 1982
Gregory Isaacs
Live At The Roxy 1982
2LP | 2018 | EU | Original (Radiation Roots)
18,99 €*
Release:2018 / EU – Original
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Limited edition for Record Store Day 2018! Reggae legend Gregory Isaacs blows the roof off of Hollywood’s Roxy Theatre with the help of superstar backing band, The Roots Radics! Recorded in 1982, to an adoring crowd of rastas, punks, freaks, and 2nd wave ska kids, Isaacs in in top form during one of his earliest USA live performances. One of the heroes of roots reggae, Isaacs plays many of his classics including “Slave Master,” “My Number One,” “Soon Forward,” “Top Ten” and more! The Cool Ruler of reggae lays it down here. Limited edition of 500 copies for RSD 2018.
Judge Dread - Dreadmania (It’s All In The Mind)
Judge Dread
Dreadmania (It’s All In The Mind)
LP | 1972 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1972 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Dreadmania (It's All In The Mind) is Judge Dread's (nee Alexander Hughes) very first album, originally released by Trojan Records in 1972, and is a confirmed Ska and Skinhead Reggae classic. The least likely of reggae stars, the white, Brixton raised Dread had previously served as a club bouncer (where he met Derrick Morgan and Prince Buster), wrestler, bodyguard, DJ, and debt collector for Trojan Records, before hitting it big in 1972 with "Big Six" - inspired by Prince Buster's classic "Big 5" - which reached number 11 on the UK chart and sold nearly a half a million copies. On the back of that hit, and its follow up "Big Seven", the label quickly assembled an album to cash in on their success, and its title, Dreadmania, aptly summed up the state of the nation, as Judge Dread fever gripped the island. Of course, the two hits were included within, as was "Oh She Is a Big Girl Now," which was subsequently spun off as a single, and "Dr. Kitch," which later reappeared as a B-side. Appropriately enough, the Chuck Berry hit "Ding a Ling" was covered, and just in case there were any remaining doubts about the album's contents, there's even a track titled "Donkey Dick." "It's all in the mind/It's all in the mind/The rudeness it's all in the mind," the Judge ruled on the opening track. Perhaps, but Dread could make even a nun blush. He was the king of the double entendre, his clever wordplay and wit a revelation for the staid British. But he also captured the imagination of Jamaicans. Dread wrapped his rude lyrics within perfect reggae backdrops, with many of his songs built around classic Jamaican rhythms, adding further authenticity to his sound.
John Wayne - Boogie Down
John Wayne
Boogie Down
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Preorder available from 11.12.2020
Delroy Wilson was one of the best-beloved vocalists in the history of reggae. Born in 1948 in the infamous slum of Trench Town, Wilson is regarded as Jamaica’s first child star, having signed a contract with future Studio One founder, Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd, at the tender age of thirteen. Wilson was blessed with a mellifluous voice and his strong range and expressive tone made him a natural for recording; equally excellent with originals and able to make any cover tune his own, young Delroy made an impact from the start. Early singles “Emy Lou” and “If I Had A Beautiful Baby” were jaunty ska love songs, yet much of Wilson’s most significant early work took the form of recorded taunts aimed at Coxsone’s rivals, most notably Prince Buster, the target of “I Shall Not Remove” and “Joe Liges.” Debut album I Shall Not Remove caused a sensation on release in 1964 and as Jamaican music evolved in the mid-60s the hits kept coming: reconfiguring The Tams’ “Dancing Mood” as a cool rock steady seemed to define the genre, while “Here Comes A Heartache” and “Never Conquer Me” were among the more sizeable hits. Delroy’s second album, Good All Over, was another landmark release of the early reggae phase, although he had already begun recording for other producers, most notably teaming with Bunny Lee for a smash rendition of The Isley Brothers’ “This Old Heart Of Mine.” As Jamaica geared up for an era-defining general election, Delroy Wilson and Bunny Lee captured the public’s imagination with “Better Must Come,” which topped the charts in 1971. The popularity of the song was such that leftist candidate Michael Manley adopted it as his campaign theme, leading to a landslide victory the following year. The Better Must Come album was recorded at Dynamic Sounds, then the best- equipped studio in the Caribbean region, with Bunny Lee in the producer’s chair and Sid Bucknor and Carlton Lee as resident engineers. In addition to the opening title track, there is a range of classic Delroy here: “Better To Be Loved” puts his soulful delivery over a creeping ‘John Crow’ organ skank; “Can’t Explain” describes the passionate allure of his new lover, while “It’s You I Love” grafts Delroy’s soulful tenor atop a sparse reggae riff, before “Dance With You” recalls a missed opportunity on the dancefloor. The determined “Try Again” is delivered in heavily accented patois, before Delroy drifts into reggae-funk territory with a killer cut of The Isleys’ “It’s Your Thing”; “Keep An Eye” warns of deceptive friends with ulterior motives and the organ-heavy “Drink Wine” salutes the uplifting qualities of fermented grapes, before closing things off with an alternate reading of Shep and The Limelights’ “Stick By Me.” Adding to the appeal is an individual drum sound, lively guitar picking and variations on the organ skank, keeping things interesting throughout.
Dillinger - Top Ranking Dillinger
Dillinger
Top Ranking Dillinger
LP | 2020 | EU (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:2020 / EU
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Preorder available from 11.12.2020
One of Jamaica’s most popular “deejays” or rappers, Dillinger was one of the few Jamaican sound system toasters to rise to international prominence as a recording artist during the mid-1970s. Born Lester Bullocks in 1953, he was raised by his grandmother in a peripheral neighbourhood located on the outskirts of Kingston. After moving into a tough ghetto area in western Kingston, he became a protégé of Dennis Alcapone, the star deejay on an influential set called El Paso, and was known as Young Alcapone until the maverick producer Lee “Scratch” Perry renamed him Dillinger, cutting a dozen or so tracks at Dynamic Sounds studio in 1973, of which the most noteworthy was “Dub Organiser,” which saluted King Tubby and his sound system. Recordings for Phil Pratt, Augustus Pablo, The Abyssinians and GG Records led to an impressive album for Studio One, but it wasn’t until he began recording for Ossie Hibbert and Joseph Hoo Kim at Channel One that the world took notice, following the dramatic success of Island’s Cb200 album and its break-though hit, “Cokane In My Brain.” The album Top Raking Dillinger was produced by Bunny Lee in 1977 and sees the toaster in fine rapping form over some of Lee’s toughest contemporary rhythms, including Ronnie Davis’ “Hard Times” for “Rat A Cut Bottle” and Johnny Clarke’s update of Alton Ellis’ “Cry Tough” for “Ranking Of The Past.” There are also roots mutations of past classics, including Cornell Campbell’s take of Bob Marley’s “War” for “War Is Not the Answer,” Johnny Clarke’s version of “Waiting In Vain” for the cheeky “Check Sister Jane,” a cut of The Silvertones’ “Smile” as “Three Mile Rock,” a horns-laden take of the perennial “Get Ready” as “Judgement Day Rock” and a version of “Melody Life” as “Don’t Watch Your Wife.”
Eric Donaldson - Eric Donaldson
Eric Donaldson
Eric Donaldson
LP | 1971 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
15,99 €*
Release:1971 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Eric Donaldson’s soaring falsetto has made him one of Jamaica’s best-loved vocalists. Born in the country town of Bog Walk in 1947, Donaldson cut some ska material at Studio One in 1964, which never surfaced, and went on to form The West Indians vocal trio at the tail end of rock steady, enjoying minor local hits for Sir JJ and Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry. Winning the annual Festival Song Competition with love ditty “Cherry Oh Baby” in 1971 saw him team up with former Jamaicans vocalist Tommy Cowan and hit-making producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee, the subsequent recording of the tune at Dynamic Sounds studio resulting in a spectacular success around the world and subsequent hit cover versions by The Rolling Stones and UB40, among many others. This self-titled debut album was recorded at Dynamics in the wake of the hit with the set of upcoming players known as The Inner Circle, which then featured future members of Third World such as keyboardist and arranger Ibo Cooper and guitarist Cat Coore; along with the enduring “Cherry Oh Baby,” there is a popular cover version of the doomed romance saga, “Sylvia’s Mother” and an individual rendition of “Love Of The Common People,” as well as the castigating “Miserable Woman,” all popular with reggae fans at home and abroad.
Sly & Robbie - Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby
Sly & Robbie
Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby
LP | 1990 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1990 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Lowell Dunbar and Robert Shakespeare are the renowned Jamaican rhythm section that has worked with a range of international stars, including Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, Joan Armatrading, Garland Jeffries and countless others. They first came to know each other in the early 1970s, when both were based in rival bands playing in clubs on Kingston’s Red Hills Road and started working together at Channel One studio in the mid-1970s, when Sly was musical arranger for the Revolutionaries house band and Robbie the main bassist for Bunny Lee’s Aggrovators. After a stint of international touring in Peter Tosh’s Word, Sound and Power band, which exposed them to the tastes and markets of overseas audiences, the pair joined forces more concertedly with their Taxi label, producing hits with Gregory Isaacs, Dennis Brown, Sugar Minott and the Wailing Souls. At the same time, as the driving force behind the Compass Point All Stars, they brought Grace Jones to prominence worldwide and made Gwen Guthrie a star through reggaefied disco, and then brought Black Uhuru into the top spot in the wake of Bob Marley’s passing. Then, when Jamaican music went digital with the “Sleng Teng” craze of the mid-1980s, Sly and Robbie made the shift in that direction too, becoming among the most prominent producers as the 80s gave way to the 90s. Dubs For Tubs: A Tribute To King Tubby is a digital dub salute to the King issued shortly after his terrible murder; it is mostly comprised of synthesizer re-cuts of classic Jamaican rhythms, with “Dub For Joy” being a tough re-working of the Heptones’ “Love Me Girl” and “Dub To Make You Move And Groove” a take on their “Party Time”; Dennis Brown’s “Here I Come” is here mutated to “Dub For Roots People” and his “Here I Come” anthem shifted into the spongy “Dub For All Seasons.” An intriguing offshoot of “Sleng Teng” is among the other highlights.
Tommy Mccook - Tommy Mccook
Tommy Mccook
Tommy Mccook
LP | 1969 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
13,99 €*
Release:1969 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Tommy McCook or, as it was known on its initial release in 1969, The Skatalite is a collection of some of the greatest ska tunes ever put to tape. Recorded By Arthur "Duke" Reid at his legendary Treasure Isle Studios - named after the family run liquor store that the studio was above on Bond St. in Kingston, JA - these classic recordings feature Roland Alphonso, Don Drummond, Rico Rodriguez, and all the original Skatalites. Also including some classic vocal appearances from some of the biggest names in ska history: Justin Hines, Stranger Cole, and Millicent "Patsy" Todd, the album is a perfect blend of Skatalites instrumentals and vocal tracks. Ska is the heartbeat that created the worldwide cultural phenomenon that is reggae music and at the very center of the ska universe you will find Tommy McCook and The Skatalites; dig here on some of their most historical and influential recordings, and start skanking!
Jah Stitch - Watch Your Step Youthman
Paragons, The - Return
Cornell Campbell - Dance In A Greenwich Farm
Cornell Campbell - Ropin'
Derrick Morgan - People Decision
Derrick Morgan
People Decision
LP | 1977 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
16,99 €*
Release:1977 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
One of the very first artists to begin recording in Jamaica, Derrick Morgan is beloved as a ska icon and a pioneer of the ‘skinhead reggae’ style. Blessed with a rich, deep tenor, which with he belts out his clever and often humorous lyrics, Morgan became known on the Kingston music scene through Vere Johns’ regular talent contests, and enjoyed a lengthy run of hits during the 1960s for producers such as Simeon Smith, Duke Reid and Clement ‘Sir Coxsone’ Dodd (among others), cultivating a popular vinyl feud with Prince Buster after being brought into Leslie Kong’s camp by the young Jimmy Cliff. Morgan moved to England during the late 1960s to capitalise on the skinhead reggae craze, but was back in Jamaica from the early 1970s, and since Bunny Lee was his brother-in-law, the two have always maintained a close working relationship. People Decision, voiced at King Tubby’s studio for Lee and released by Third World in 1977, sees Morgan in politicised roots reggae mode on songs like ‘Let’s Build A Better Jamaica,’ the symbolic racetrack drama ‘Racing At Ballistic Park,’ and the title track, which all boosted the socialist policies of the ruling People’s National Party; ‘Natty Dread Forward Out Of Babylon’ updates the ‘Tougher Than Tough’ saga, and there’s a slew of rude tunes when you flip the disc, including ‘My Dickie,’ ‘Rough Grinder’ and ‘Ride Manny Fanny.’
Barry Brown - I’m Still Waiting
Barry Brown
I’m Still Waiting
LP | 1983 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
19,99 €*
Release:1983 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Roots reggae star Barry Brown has a readily identifiable vocal style that has long made him among the most preferred of many roots reggae fans. Drawing largely from the blueprint provided by Horace Andy, but changing that into something all his own through a unique form of vocal phrasing, interspersed with ad-hoc slurs, Brown was initially discovered through the many amateur talent contests that fringed his west Kingston ghetto neighbourhood during the early 1970s; he was also making an impact at the same time by performing live on local sound systems. Several different producers have claimed to have been the first to record him, but it is undeniable that Brown had strong links with Sugar Minott’s Black Roots collective, and some of Brown’s very first recordings were released by Sugar, both in Jamaica and overseas. The exceptionally rare album I’m Still Waiting was released in 1983 by Rocktone International, a spin-off of Sugar’s Black Roots outfit, based in Queens, New York, with a further branch in Toronto (which reportedly closed just prior to the album’s release). As noted on the original sleeve, the musicians featured on the disc include ‘Milo T, Snappin, Badness, Flowers, and Drummie from High Times,’ while Mr Brown is on fine form throughout.
Dillinger - Answer Me Question
Dillinger
Answer Me Question
LP | 1977 | EU | Reissue (Radiation Roots)
19,99 €*
Release:1977 / EU – Reissue
Genre:Reggae / Dancehall
Trained in the art of deejay toasting by the legendary Dennis Alcapone, Lester Bulllock initially called himself Alcapone Junior, until maverick record producer Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry renamed him Dillinger in the early 1970s, following his success on a west Kingston sound system called Smith the Weapon, based in the ghetto of Payne Avenue. Perry cut Dillinger’s first dozen tracks, and there was early work for other producers such as Prince Tony, Augustus Pablo, Enos McLeod and Phil Pratt; then, Dillinger’s debut album, Ready Natty Dreadie, was a local hit for Studio One, but the CB200 set for Island catapulted him to international prominence. Yet, the Dillinger material with the roughest edge was always produced by Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee, as this LP, Answer My Question, so amply demonstrates. First issued in the Netherlands on the Scramble label in 1977, it shows Dillinger on fearsome form, his relaxed rhyming toasts tackling sound system matters, the Rastafari lifestyle, action movie subplots, the highs and lows of romantic relationships, the need to help the less fortunate, and other burning issues of the day with biting wit and verbal dexterity, all delivered over tough Aggrovators rhythms—including an unusual cut of the ‘Three Piece Suit’ rhythm. Go deh!
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