INFOHHV »For The Culture«Corona Updates
VINYL WEEKENDERVinyl for a special price – Only until Monday, March 1st, 23:59 CET
GenresNew In StockBack In StockPreorderHHV ExclusivesHHV Top 100ChartsSale

Run DMC US Hip Hop 7 Items

Show Filter & CategoriesFilter Results
Sorting: Popular
96 Items/Page
Run DMC - Raising Hell Limited Numbered Mobile Fidelity Edition
Run DMC
Raising Hell Limited Numbered Mobile Fidelity Edition
2LP | 1986 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
86,99 €*
Release:1986 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Preorder available from 05.03.2021
Among the Most Influential, Inventive, Invigorating Records Ever Released: Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell Brought Hip-Hop to the Mainstream, Includes Crossover Smash "Walk This Way"

Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Strictly Limited to 3,000 Numbered Copies: Mobile Fidelity 180g 45rpm 2LP Heightens Rick Rubin's Pioneering Production

Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell remains the turning point at which hip-hop crashed through mainstream barriers and never left. Anchored by the crossover smash "Walk This Way," the 1986 blockbuster still sounds like a revolution unfolding in real time. It has everything – hard-rock riffs, turntable scratching, itchy rhythms, hit singles – not the least of which are the trio's invigorating raps and inseparable chemistry. And now it's the first rap record afforded audiophile treatment, courtesy of Mobile Fidelity's simply illin' analog edition.

Mastered from the original master tapes, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 copies and 2000 Sacd, the unsurpassed reissue label's 180g 45rpm 2LP set elevates Raising Hell to sonic heights on par with its musical and cultural significance. Ranked the 123rd Greatest Album of All Time by Rolling Stone, 43rd on Pitchfork's Greatest Albums of the 1980s, one of the Top 100 Albums of All Time by Time – and included on "Best of" lists by Spin, Paste, XXL, Entertainment Weekly, and basically every other significant media outlet – the triple-platinum effort rocks the house.

Afforded extra groove space, Raising Hell unleashes a torrent of massive dynamics and tsunami of frequency-plumbing details underlined by Rick Rubin's taut, crisp, albeit raw and streetwise production. Just as the Queens-based group both defined what hip-hop could represent – and displayed just how big it could get – Rubin's work melded ear-worm hooks, savvy drum loops, metal-leaning guitars, and, of course, Run and D.M.C.'s cross-fire lyrical interplay into watertight frameworks bursting with ideas, tones, samples, and beats. Heard anew on Mobile Fidelity vinyl, Raising Hell is in every regard the aural equivalent of a direct-to-console 1970s classic. And it sounds as fresh as hell.

As for the music, it ranks among the most influential, inventive, and invigorating ever released – rap or otherwise. Vanguard artists such as Ice-T, Eminem, Jay-Z, and Public Enemy's Chuck D – who declared it his all-time favorite and "the first record that made me realize this was an album-oriented genre" – have testified on behalf of its brilliance. And never mind the presence of the Top 5 single "Walk This Way," whose power helped make Aerosmith's Steven Tyler and Joe Perry relevant for the first time in nearly a decade – and literally put Run-D.M.C. in bedrooms ranging from the Bronx to Bartlett to Bad Axe.

Look instead to the rest of the entirely filler-free set, be it the corkscrew turns, slippery wordplay, and "My Sharona"-meets-"Mickey" mixology of the boisterous "It's Tricky," the fat-but-minimized bass grooves and warped turntable wobble of the hysterical "You Be Illin'," chimes-accented inertia and boombox-on-shoulder thunder of the now-iconic "Peter Piper," or voice-as-percussion attack of the funky "Is It Live." With Raising Hell, the answer to the question is always affirmative – a sensation bolstered by the fact the group always had something to say.

The definition of Golden Age Hip-Hop in every way, Run-D.M.C. avoids the negativity and misogyny that later plagued the style, spinning assertive tales about identity (the biographical and culture-changing "My Adidas"), work ethics ("Perfection"), and, most notably, pride (the Harriet Tubman- and Malcom X.-referencing "Proud to Be Black"). Pavement-packed inner cities, tree-lined suburbs, and cornfield-rimmed rural areas would never again be the same. And rocking a rhyme that's right on time would become trickier than ever.
Run DMC - Run Dmc Clear Vinyl Edition
Run DMC
Run Dmc Clear Vinyl Edition
LP | 2019 | US | Original (Get On Down)
27,99 €*
Release:2019 / US – Original
Genre:Hip Hop
Future archaeologists will discuss two periods in 1980s: before Run-DMC and after Run-DMC. It’s no exaggeration to say that the group changed the course of music in the ‘80s, bringing the old-school of rap into the new with one simple piece of flat, black plastic. Coming up in the rap world of the early 1980s under the wing of Kurtis Blow (group manager Russell Simmons managed Blow, and Run was, at one time, a DJ known as “Son of Kurtis Blow”) and Blow’s bassist and burgeoning super-producer Larry Smith, the trio – Joseph “Run” Simmons, Darryl “DMC” McDaniels and Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell – learned from the best, but created their own path. 1983 was the year that they first broke out. With only an Oberheim DMX drum program and some cuts by Jay, “Sucker M.C.s (Krush-Groove 1)” was a shot across the bow to the slick, post-disco pocket rap had settled into. It was raw, pure swagger and it took both New Yorkers and music aficionados around the world by storm. The song’s lyrics are a mandatory memorization assignment to this day by MCs learning their craft. “Two years ago, a friend of mine…”
The group’s sound, which was laid out muscularly on Run-DMC, had a harder approach than their peers, thanks to producer Larry Smith’s use of live musicians who laid down grooves but didn’t soften the edges. Lyrically the group wasn’t just about brags either, with songs like “Hard Times,” “It’s Like That” and “Wake Up” (the first two were singles). Run’s and DMC’s overlapping tag-team approach to lyricism was powerful and immensely influential.
“Rock Box,” another single and arguably the centerpiece of the album, was a nod to their hard edge, and a foreshadowing of their first worldwide smash, 1985’s “King Of Rock.” Jam Master Jay’s DJ work was stellar, knowing exactly when to jump in and put listeners’ ears in a headlock.
The album was the first rap full-length to achieve Gold status, and as fans know, the group was just getting started – their next two LPs would take them to even higher status in the music world, critically and sales-wise. But this is where it all started, and it’s a classic that still sounds
fresh today as it did more than 30 years ago.
Run DMC - Raising Hell
Run DMC - Raising Hell Limited Numbered Hybrid Sacd Stereo Mobile Fidelity Edition
Run DMC
Raising Hell Limited Numbered Hybrid Sacd Stereo Mobile Fidelity Edition
CD | 1986 | US | Reissue (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab)
40,49 €* 44,99 € -10%
Release:1986 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Among the Most Influential, Inventive, Invigorating Records Ever Released: Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell Brought Hip-Hop to the Mainstream, Includes Crossover Smash "Walk This Way"

Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Strictly Limited to 2,000 Numbered Copies: Mobile Fidelity Hybrid Sacd Dramatically Heightens Rick Rubin's Pioneering Production Run-D.M.C.'s Raising Hell remains the turning point at which hip-hop crashed through mainstream barriers and never left. Anchored by the crossover smash "Walk This Way," the 1986 blockbuster still sounds like a revolution unfolding in real time. It has everything – hard-rock riffs, turntable scratching, itchy rhythms, hit singles – not the least of which are the trio's invigorating raps and inseparable chemistry. And now it's the first rap record afforded audiophile treatment, courtesy of Mobile Fidelity's simply illin' analog edition.

Mastered from the original master tapes, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 copies and 2000 Sacd, the unsurpassed reissue label's 180g 45rpm 2LP set elevates Raising Hell to sonic heights on par with its musical and cultural significance. Ranked the 123rd Greatest Album of All Time by Rolling Stone, 43rd on Pitchfork's Greatest Albums of the 1980s, one of the Top 100 Albums of All Time by Time – and included on "Best of" lists by Spin, Paste, XXL, Entertainment Weekly, and basically every other significant media outlet – the triple-platinum effort rocks the house.



Afforded extra groove space, Raising Hell unleashes a torrent of massive dynamics and tsunami of frequency-plumbing details underlined by Rick Rubin's taut, crisp, albeit raw and streetwise production. Just as the Queens-based group both defined what hip-hop could represent – and displayed just how big it could get – Rubin's work melded ear-worm hooks, savvy drum loops, metal-leaning guitars, and, of course, Run and D.M.C.'s cross-fire lyrical interplay into watertight frameworks bursting with ideas, tones, samples, and beats. Heard anew on Mobile Fidelity vinyl, Raising Hell is in every regard the aural equivalent of a direct-to-console 1970s classic. And it sounds as fresh as hell.



As for the music, it ranks among the most influential, inventive, and invigorating ever released – rap or otherwise. Vanguard artists such as Ice-T, Eminem, Jay-Z, and Public Enemy's Chuck D – who declared it his all-time favorite and "the first record that made me realize this was an album-oriented genre" – have testified on behalf of its brilliance. And never mind the presence of the Top 5 single "Walk This Way," whose power helped make Aerosmith's Steven Tyler and Joe Perry relevant for the first time in nearly a decade – and literally put Run-D.M.C. in bedrooms ranging from the Bronx to Bartlett to Bad Axe.



Look instead to the rest of the entirely filler-free set, be it the corkscrew turns, slippery wordplay, and "My Sharona"-meets-"Mickey" mixology of the boisterous "It's Tricky," the fat-but-minimized bass grooves and warped turntable wobble of the hysterical "You Be Illin'," chimes-accented inertia and boombox-on-shoulder thunder of the now-iconic "Peter Piper," or voice-as-percussion attack of the funky "Is It Live." With Raising Hell, the answer to the question is always affirmative – a sensation bolstered by the fact the group always had something to say.

The definition of Golden Age Hip-Hop in every way, Run-D.M.C. avoids the negativity and misogyny that later plagued the style, spinning assertive tales about identity (the biographical and culture-changing "My Adidas"), work ethics ("Perfection"), and, most notably, pride (the Harriet Tubman- and Malcom X.-referencing "Proud to Be Black"). Pavement-packed inner cities, tree-lined suburbs, and cornfield-rimmed rural areas would never again be the same. And rocking a rhyme that's right on time would become trickier than ever.
Run DMC - King Of Rock
Run DMC - Raising Hell
Run DMC
Raising Hell
LP | 1986 | US | Reissue (Get On Down)
23,99 €*
Release:1986 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Up until “Raising Hell”, the rap juggernaut we know as Run-DMC was still in its building and breaking-down- doors phase. In 1986 that changed, and in a dramatic way. With their third long-player, the group had reached the mountaintop. It was THE record that proved hip-hop wasn't a fad.

“Raising Hell” marked an important and significant new era for the group. Leaving producer Larry Smith for up-and- coming sonic innovator Rick Rubin (still co-produced by Run's brother Russell Simmons), they began to fully transition not only their own sound, but the sound of the entire genre. Less live playing – with some exceptions – and a slicker, tighter sonic attack. Musical aesthetics aside, though, at their core they stayed true to the essence of hip-hop: two turntables and a microphone, or two.

It's impossible to talk about the album without its worldwide smash, "Walk This Way," which hit #4 on the Billboard pop charts and saw the group digging in the rock crates to summon Aerosmith in the flesh, combining Steven Tyler's and Joe Perry's musicianship with the group's own take on the '70s classic. The song's video cemented Run-DMC as legit MTV idols, and both groups rode its wave to new heights.

Beyond "Walk This Way," the platter is full to the hilt with undeniable classic singles: "You Be Illin'"; "It's Tricky"; "Peter Piper" and the fashion-world shifting "My Adidas." Each song was new proof that Run-DMC's sound was indeed new, but still familiar, and full of the energy, charisma and innovation that drew fans to their first two LPs.

Aside from the singles, the reason the album stands up so well is the fact that there is virtually no filler. "Proud To Be Black" remains a pioneering and underrated cut when people talk about "conscious" hip-hop. And to make sure they never lost the streets that gave them their start, "Hit It Run," "Son Of Byford," "Is It Live" and "Perfection" all bring it back to the group's early days in the park.

Besides the triple platinum status, the album achieved, it was more than just a pop smash. It signaled a new era for rap music, and it was the no-turning- back point for the entire genre. This was the beginning of what we now call the Golden Era, and it still sounds as fresh today as it did three decades ago.
Run DMC - King Of Rock
Run DMC
King Of Rock
LP | 1984 | US | Reissue (Get On Down)
24,99 €*
Release:1984 / US – Reissue
Genre:Hip Hop
Run DMC’s self-titled 1984 debut pushed the doors of pop music open, showing that hip-hop was not the fad that haters had prophesized. As they proved decisively on Run-DMC, rap was a legit art form, fully capable of producing long-players full of no-fast-forward cuts.
By 1985, any doubters were running on fumes, as the group’s King Of Rock blew the aforementioned pop doors off their hinges. Emboldened by their success (including the first rap album to ever go Gold), energized by worldwide touring and accolades, and given all the support they could want by a genius producer (Larry Smith), an open-minded label (Profile) and a charismatic manager (Russell Simmons, who also lent a hand on production), they ruled the charts and hinted at even greater things to come.
The album’s most fondly-remembered single set the album’s tone perfectly: “King Of Rock” was hard, full of charisma and tag-team vocal finesse, and had enough guitars to bring the suburbs into the rap fold. The song’s video was equally popular and powerful, and the pioneering MTV exposure drove the group into a new stratosphere.
But there was much more to King Of Rock than the title track, including more rock / rap hybrids – “Can You Rock It Like This” and “You’re Blind” – as well as the additional singles “Jam-Master Jammin’” and “You Talk Too Much.” (The latter, incidentally, charted as high as “King Of Rock” on both the Pop and R&B charts).
Throw in the forward-thinking reggae/rap collab “Roots, Rap, Reggae” (featuring the legendary Yellowman) and the live-throwdown-simulation “Darryl and Joe (Krush-Groove 3)” and the album – which went on to pass Platinum status
– is a winner from A1 to B4.
Back To Top
Tracklist
Tracklist
Close Player